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When having your valves serviced for the first time did they require adjustment?

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Hey folks!

Having just recently had two V-Strom 650s (2017+2013) into the shop for valve checks with both being within "spec" I was wondering what your experiences have been thus far. I have attached a poll for those interested with the intention of guiding those who may be considering skipping the ever so crucial valve check.
It is worth mentioning that both bikes had over 30,000km on them.

-Colin
YouTube.com/TrailTrashADV
 

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My guess is most members are going to post that they had their valves checked and they were within specification, but how would this info. lead to good guidance? Most of us check our oil and it’s full but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be checked. I check the oil on my Peterbilt daily and it doesn’t burn a drop, but I have immediately caught things like when an oil filter wasn’t put on tight enough.

I’ve seen a number of members on this forum posting that it’s probably okay to skip the valve check. I’m not so sure that is great advice. You want to check it and you want it to be within specification. That doesn’t mean you wasted your money. It means you don’t need to spend more money/time making adjustments.

Anyhow, interesting poll.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My guess is most members are going to post that they had their valves checked and they were within specification, but how would this info. lead to good guidance? Most of us check our oil and it’s full but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be checked. I check the oil on my Peterbilt daily and it doesn’t burn a drop, but I have immediately caught things like when an oil filter wasn’t put on tight enough.

I’ve seen a number of members on this forum posting that it’s probably okay to skip the valve check. I’m not so sure that is great advice. You want to check it and you want it to be within specification. That doesn’t mean you wasted your money. It means you don’t need to spend more money/time making adjustments.

Anyhow, interesting poll.
I think you took away from that post what you wanted, and I find your reply rude and abrasive; there is no need for this.
I agree, valve checks should be done, period. However, for some members who may be buying a used bike or perhaps have come upon tough financial times due to COVID may be wondering what the stats are to further inform their decision making hence the poll.
Much love 💗
 

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I will give you data points even though I don't have a 650. Below were done around 25,000 to 30,000 miles.

2007 DL1000 - checked, barely out of range
2013 Super Tenere - checked, in range
2015 Super Tenere - checked, in range

The DL was checked one more time around 50,000 (in range) then never again, sold it.
The 2013 Tenere was wrecked
The 2015 Tenere may never be checked again

Checking oil is free. Checking valves is $300 + unless you do it yourself..
 

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I find your reply rude and abrasive; there is no need for this.
I was attacking the topic nothing more. There was nothing personal in my post.
 
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I'll check mine myself at an estimated ~23-24,000 miles/37-38600km the fall, maybe sooner. I know from my two previous Kawis that as the gap gets under tolerance, the performance lags. At ≤3mm gap, there can be some backfire pops back up through the carb er, throttle bodies. On those bikes, I would err toward the higher tolerance if the measurement was close. the KZ750 has shim under buckets, the ZX11 did not.
 

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Very good independent shop I go to and who adjusted the valves on my previous 2015 650XT, mentioned there are "very few" bikes he checks which are in spec on the first check, and just like mine most have tight exhausts. My Tracer GT doesn't need checked until I believe 24k miles, but most all who did them earlier said they needed adjusted. IMHO I say to anyone asking or wondering......just get them checked and prepare that they will/should need adjusted. ;)
 

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As a comment, CHECKING the valves is relatively easy, adjusting not so easy. So check them yourself, if they are out pay a shop to do the adjust.
 

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Twice, I've done valve checks / adjusts on DL650s. One was a 2007. One was a 2012. Was first valve check, for both bikes, and at 30K and 40K miles, respectively. In both instances, I think I adjusted over half the eight valves.

For me, the tedious "work" is removing all the stuff to get to the engine. After the engine was exposed, adequately, I found the valve-adjusting work pleasant, entertaining and enjoyable. I didn't rush, though, with either bike. Especially not with the 2012 (took weeks, in dead of winter, for that one, ordering only the shims it needed, cylinder by cylinder, from Rocky Mountain ATV).

Good results, both times, and I (mostly) earn my living as a desk jockey, though I've done a fair amount of mechanic work on lawn mowers, cars / trucks, farm tractors & equipment and, now, on DL650s.
 

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We desperately need a good how-to YouTube video on checking/adjusting. Haven't found a great one so far.

Anyone wanna step up?
It's freakin' tough to shoot a good one. I'll probably try next year though. I shot a video on valve clearance adjustment for a gen 1 SV650 a few months ago. By far the most difficult part was dealing with the cam chain tensioners and creating a working special tool for them. However, those CCTs are a lot different (I think) than what are on the 2017+ DL650. It looks like there are some tricks to being able to loosen chain tension without removing the CCTs completely. I'm only at about 4,000 miles right now on mine though, so that's why I figured I'd wait until next year.
 

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Hey folks!

Having just recently had two V-Strom 650s (2017+2013) into the shop for valve checks with both being within "spec" I was wondering what your experiences have been thus far. I have attached a poll for those interested with the intention of guiding those who may be considering skipping the ever so crucial valve check.
It is worth mentioning that both bikes had over 30,000km on them.

-Colin
YouTube.com/TrailTrashADV
If they checked the valves and found them just at or even 0.01-0.02 mm from the bottom end of the range, technically that's in spec, but what are the chances that in the next 24k km these will tighten to below the spec?

I do the inspections/adjustments myself for my and some friend's bikes and on the V-Stroms I have checked, at least one valve was at or even just below spec in the first inspection. Because, as mentioned above, most of the work is getting to the valves, once there, it makes little sense to me to leave a valve that is just or almost at the bottom of the spec w/o correcting it.


Gustavo
 

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Over the past weekend I did the 14500 mile valve check on my 2019 V-Strom 650XT Touring. All the intake valves were in the middle of the spec range at .006/1000", but 3 of the exhaust valves were out of spec at .006/1000" and 1 exhaust valve was at .0085/1000". So all the exhaust valves got adjusted to .010/1000".

A couple of things I learned while doing the job:
1. Be very careful reinstalling the cam chain tensioner plug/bolts as it is easy to strip out the threads. Which I unfortunately did on the the front tensioner, so I had to order another one off eBay and the bike is now down until the part arrives.

2. It is not necessary to pull the cams off of the cam chains in order to remove the valve buckets, at least on the exhaust cams. I simply zip tied the chains to the cam sprockets then rolled the sprockets toward the intake cams, which makes more than enough room to get the buckets out.

3. Completely remove the radiator. While it may be possible to inspect the valve clearence with the radiator still connected to the electrical connectors and hoses, it makes the job a lot easier for the front cylinder head.
 

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We desperately need a good how-to YouTube video on checking/adjusting. Haven't found a great one so far.

Anyone wanna step up?
 

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Over the past weekend I did the 14500 mile valve check on my 2019 V-Strom 650XT Touring. All the intake valves were in the middle of the spec range at .006/1000", but 3 of the exhaust valves were out of spec at .006/1000" and 1 exhaust valve was at .0085/1000". So all the exhaust valves got adjusted to .010/1000".

A couple of things I learned while doing the job:
1. Be very careful reinstalling the cam chain tensioner plug/bolts as it is easy to strip out the threads. Which I unfortunately did on the the front tensioner, so I had to order another one off eBay and the bike is now down until the part arrives.

2. It is not necessary to pull the cams off of the cam chains in order to remove the valve buckets, at least on the exhaust cams. I simply zip tied the chains to the cam sprockets then rolled the sprockets toward the intake cams, which makes more than enough room to get the buckets out.

3. Completely remove the radiator. While it may be possible to inspect the valve clearence with the radiator still connected to the electrical connectors and hoses, it makes the job a lot easier for the front cylinder head.
Did you happen to discover or find anything about the process that is different than the previous generation? All of the walkthrough's/particulars I can find are for the older generations, and I want to make sure it is safe to follow the same process before doing so on my 2017 650XT.

In particular, things like the cam lobe positions for TDC, cranking the engine 360-degrees back to the "F" mark in the inspection hole before adjusting the rear valve clearances, the 16 chain link method for reinstalling the camshafts, etc. - any of those that are different for the 2017+, or anything different compared to the process that was outline in the helpful walkthrough posted above?:

Suzuki V-Strom DL650 Valve Check and Adjustment

Thanks
 

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It is the same motor. The cams do have slightly different profiles (evolution) but they use the very same shims etc.
 

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If you go to the trouble of pulling the valve covers why not put them at the loose end of spec and forget checking them again for a long time. Unless the exhaust valves are on the loose end I wouldn't just close up without adjustment. I don't enjoy striping a Strom down past the valve covers. I think I only skipped an adjustment on the FJR that was barely in spec, but the valves were easy to get to on that bike and I was short on time. If I had a shop do a valve check I would make sure I was present for the measurements and the decision to adjust or not. I'm not the trusting type anymore, haven't been for many years. Been told lies at dealers too many times. Highly prefer the independent shops that work on anything.
 

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Reasons above. Checking the valve clearances not much can go wrong, admitted it is a PITA to get there but reassembly only takes time, actually adjusting, quite a bit can go wrong.
 

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Did you happen to discover or find anything about the process that is different than the previous generation? All of the walkthrough's/particulars I can find are for the older generations, and I want to make sure it is safe to follow the same process before doing so on my 2017 650XT.

In particular, things like the cam lobe positions for TDC, cranking the engine 360-degrees back to the "F" mark in the inspection hole before adjusting the rear valve clearances, the 16 chain link method for reinstalling the camshafts, etc. - any of those that are different for the 2017+, or anything different compared to the process that was outline in the helpful walkthrough posted above?:

Suzuki V-Strom DL650 Valve Check and Adjustment

Thanks
As far as I can tell the procedure listed in that link is the same for a 2019 V-Strom 650.
 
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