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So my Wee Vee seems just a little tall for me. Just can’t quite flat foot it. Looking at the lowering links from Pro Cycle. Used them on my KLR years ago and absolutely loved them. Like the way bike handled after that as well. Anyone used them? Pros and Cons? So far very little in mind for after market upgrades but a little bar rise and lowering links are the first 2 on the list.
 

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I'm very glad to have the flexibility of soupy's adjustable height links. I've tweaked the height several time with just the turn of a wrench. I wouldn't want to be locked into a fixed height.

Also, try just lowering just the front fork first if all you need is a slight lowering. The bike will handle better with the forks sticking up 10-15 mm in the tree and the bike will feel slightly lower too.
 

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Links are really quick n' easy to make, A 1" flat bar, 3/16 or 1/4" thick, drill 1/2" holes. Bolt 'em together at the one end before drilling the second set of holes, so they'll match perfect. Mine measure 6" center to center, for a 1" plus drop, on an 06 Wee. I found info that 5.9", is for a 1-1/8" drop, so mine must be 1-1/4". But I've ridden with a passenger, and never bottomed the rear tire against the inner fenderwell.
 

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Don’t know the product you are talking about but there are plenty of offerings and they obviously all do the same thing. I chose the Ravetech ones (eBay or direct through their website) because they are made of solid stainless steel. Some people had their aftermarket aluminum links wear out on them over time. OEM is steel.
 

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OEM is zinc plated stamped mild steel.

The aluminum links that wore out were cheap 6061-T6 off of Ebay. 6061-T6 is a great material, but is not as strong as steel in the same dimensions. The people selling these links knew that they were not as strong as stock and marketed them as light duty. They went out of business soon after.

Ours are 7075-T6 which is stronger than most steels in the same dimensions. In ten years we have NEVER had a link fail and fully expect to never have one fail.

Our links are available from 1/2" to 1.125" in 1/8 inch increments.

I recommend that you place boards of different thicknesses next to you bike to simulate different amounts of lowering and then lower the bike minimum necessary to make you comfortable. Many people have been surprised at how little is needed do make the confidant and comfortable. As changing the height changes how well the side stand and center stand work you will want to make as little change as needed.

3/4" up or down is the sweet spot for maximum change without feeling like you need to modify the stands.

Gen 1 and 2 DL650 and Gen 1 DL1000 - AdventureTech, LLC.
 

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I got mine from Richland rick. Quality product and priced right. Also, He's one of us. I support him.
 

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I have a pair of 3/4" lowering links that I took of my '12 650. If you find they are a matching cross reference they're yours for the price of shipping!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good to know about Adventure Tech, that may be the direction I'll be going. And thanks for the generous offer Mucksavage. I'm going to make the decision after I get my break in miles in. Still need a chance to bond with the new bike and feel it out. My go to would have been Pro Cycle based out of Eugene, Oregon, but I see they don't offer links for my year. I have Adventure Tech link saved, thanks richlandrick think I may soon be a supporter as well. Thanks DonOhio I didn't think about making my own, good info and it wouldn't cost me a dime will the resources I have at work.
 

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So my Wee Vee seems just a little tall for me. Just can’t quite flat foot it. Looking at the lowering links from Pro Cycle. Used them on my KLR years ago and absolutely loved them. Like the way bike handled after that as well. Anyone used them? Pros and Cons? So far very little in mind for after market upgrades but a little bar rise and lowering links are the first 2 on the list.
I just put the links from suz sv650 on

Larry
 

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Rum Runner,
I lowered the rear of my '11 650 1", and did nothing to the front forks. For me this worked well. When I purchased my '14 1000, I was stubborn and did not lower it. For three years I rode it at stock height with the low seat. It was o.k. but not ideal. Last year, I lowered the rear of my 1000 1", and the front forks just a little. I also went back to the stock seat. BTW, I am 62 y/o 5'8" on a good day, 29" inseam. It transformed the bike into one that was much more manageable for me, on and off road. I should have lowered the 1000 when I first purchased it. It now handles and rides great. I do have a SW Motech skidplate that has scraped the ground a time or two, and do not have a center stand. I don't go off road much, so that is fine. My next Vstrom will for sure be lowered as soon as I take possession.
 

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Lowered my 2017 650 with 3/4" bones from Adventuretech. Excellent, confidence-inspiring quality. Posted pics of the process on the board somewhere. I'm 5'9", with a 29" inseam. I also dropped the front 19mm to maintain the bike's original geometry (rake and trail). 2nd Strom I've lowered with Rick's bones, and the handling, and manageability on both was/is spectacular with the mod.
 
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