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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I have seen conflicting reports that the new DL1000 requires premium fuel. Does anyone have the definitive answer?

Thanks,

--John
 

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Theres a sticker right on the bike that says it requires premium. I would guess anything else you do would be something of an experiment.
 

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Correct, the sticker actually says to use Premium fuel "or 90 octane minimum".
 

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That is disappointing to hear. Premium fuel is harder to find where I am. For me that is a bit of a deal breaker. Will wait to see how others make out running regular fuel before I seriously consider making the leap to the new 1000.
 

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Fuel

Two thoughts. Firstly, premium fuel is not the same in each country- octane level in Canada is higher than in the US for the same grade of gasoline. Secondly, contrary to popular belief, using a lower grade may not make any difference, damage the engine, or cause warranty issues. My old caddy required premium (in the book) but never tasted any over the 12 years I owned it
 

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Key is to never let ethanol anywhere near the bike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think this is poor engineering on Suzuki's part. There are outlying places in Oregon where premium gasoline is not sold. It does not make sense for a "dual sport" motorcycle to have to burn premium (although I guess all the BMW's require it too.)

This concern, along with fuel range, seat height, lack of wind protection, suspected lack of off road capability, and high cost will keep me on the DL650 for now...

--John
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Cars with knock sensors can run regular even though the engine is designed to use premium for best performance. The knock sensor will retard the spark timing if needed. I've seen no mention of a knock sensor on the new Strom. I would not run it on lower octane fuel.
 

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Firstly, premium fuel is not the same in each country- octane level in Canada is higher than in the US for the same grade of gasoline.
Yes and no. Most countries around the world use RON, Research Octane Number, on the gas pump. The U.S. and Canada use the average of RON and the Motor Octane Number, (RON + MON) ÷ 2, also known as the Anti Knock Index, AKI.

"RON is determined by running the fuel in a test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing the results with those for mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane. MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON, however there is no direct link between RON and MON. ...the octane rating shown in Canada and the United States is 4 to 5 points lower than the rating shown elsewhere in the world for the same fuel."
Octane rating - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Anyway, we'll have to wait and see what the sticker on the new Vee shows for the bike certified and sold in each country.


Much, much, more about gasoline:
https://www.chevronwithtechron.com/products/documents/69083_MotorGas_Tech_Review.pdf

"The technical octane number requirement (ONR) of an engine is the octane number of a reference fuel that will produce trace knock under the most severe speed and load conditions. Trace knock is the knock intensity that is just audible to a trained technician. Customers may or may not be able to detect trace knock, so customer ONR is usually less than the technical ONR. For the remainder of this review, ONR will refer to technical ONR. ONR can be reported as a RON or AKI value. The ONR of an engine is usually determined for either maximum-throttle or part-throttle acceleration conditions, whichever is the most critical. ONR varies considerably engine to engine, sometimes as much as 10 points among vehicles with the same engine model.

"With late-model vehicles that use engine control module (ECM) systems and knock sensors, the traditional definition of ONR may no longer apply since the knock sensor systems are calibrated to either nearly or completely eliminate audible knock. Work is being done to redefine the ONR for modern vehicles based on a measure of acceleration performance. When an engine is brand-new, its ONR is determined by its design and manufacture. Generally, an engine will not
knock when operated on a gasoline with the AKI or RON recommended by the automobile manufacturer. However, an engine’s ONR can increase dramatically during the first several thousand kilometers (miles) of a vehicle’s use. This effect, called octane requirement increase (ORI), is caused by the buildup of carbonaceous deposits in the engine’s combustion chambers. If an engine is equipped with a knock sensor, a slight loss of power may occur during heavy accelerations. This happens if the ORI results in an octane number requirement that exceeds the AKI of the gasoline being used.

"It is difficult for a driver to know whether a gasoline has the antiknock performance an engine requires when the engine is equipped with a knock sensor system. These systems, which temporarily retard spark timing to eliminate knocking, are installed on many latemodel engines (see page 72). Retarding the spark reduces power and acceleration. The knock sensor responds so quickly that the driver never notices the knock. Loss of power and acceleration will be the only clue that the antiknock quality of the gasoline does not meet the vehicle’s octane requirement. Using gasoline with an antiknock rating higher than that required to prevent knock or to prevent spark retardation by the knock sensor will not improve a vehicle’s performance."

From the Chevron link above.
 

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That is disappointing to hear. Premium fuel is harder to find where I am. For me that is a bit of a deal breaker. Will wait to see how others make out running regular fuel before I seriously consider making the leap to the new 1000.
You've got that right. I now avoid, any vehicle that requires premium.
 

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I now avoid any vehicle that requires premium.
Completely different engine, I know, but my turbo Volvo was recommended to take premium and I ran it well over 100,000 miles on regular, and it ran great. I used premium only for a little extra go for freeway mountain driving (2.3L engine, 3200# weight). Finally sold that car with 202,000 miles and still running great.
which ever octane gives you the best average mpg is the best fuel for your bike.
Don't expect much mpg difference from the octane rating. Octane gives antiknock capability. Yes, the retarded timing when using lower octane in an engine designed for high octane may slightly hurt mpg, but still result in a total savings of fuel cost per mile.
 

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which every(sic) octane gives you the best average mpg is the best fuel for your bike.
Rubbish. The lowest octane that does not cause pinging is the logical choice unless range is your ultimate criterion. Higher octane may provide very slightly more range but still will cost more per mile, does not provide more power, and is no better for your engine. An exception would be if a better additive package is included. Use of Top Tier Gasoline takes care of that.
 

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The handbook for my CDN 2014 1000 says 90 octane. In BC there is 87 and 91 available, and at Chevron a 94 super premium which does not contain ethanol. The Shell super premium "V" allegedly does not contain ethanol. The handbook says up to 10% ethanol and up to 5% methanol. Those in the USA will have to avoid the E15.
 

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I believe the worst effect of ethanol is its fatal attraction to water. It dissolves any water it comes into contact with and temperature changes may cause it to re-seperate and settle at the bottom of the fuel tank for later consumption. Additionally, since the ethanol accounts for the much of the octane rating, if it is busy dissolving water, the octane number of the fuel drops. If the fuel is burned shortly after filling, it's not bad, but if it is going to sit in the tank a while, it could promote the growth of fungi, rust and sludge... Not good!
In Canada, I think the only way to avoid ethanol is to use premium fuel. Does anyone know any different?

Ref.: BoatUS Magazine: Three Ethanol Myths Clarified
 

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Hi Compression Engine:

I'm not an engineer but have been riding and racing motorcycles and cars for 40 years. Gents you've got a high compression motor that the manufacturer requires you to run premium fuel. The main reason being high compression needs the higher octane to run properly. Yes it will run on lower grade fuel for awhile but will void your warranty and could very well destroy your motor. My last bike was a 2010 Triumph Tiger 1050 Triple. Recommended premium fuel for a reason. Those that dared to buck the requirements of Triumph like many of you suggest you do with the new V-Strom were awarded with cracked pistons. They then went back to their dealers with their tails between their legs asking for their warranty repairs. No deal. Those that ran premium fuel had none of those problems and like myself road hard and fast with no problems. When running on the track at VIR we always used Sunoco racing fuel that had an octane rating over 100. Very noticeable difference in performance! I know everyone has an opinion regarding this issue but my question is why would you want to run a fuel that does not meet the requirements of the motor with the outcome of possibly destroying your motor? If you want a high performance machine don't expect it to run properly on cheap fuel. OK, I'm done. Don't want to tick anybody off just sharing my experience from past years.

Later

FastLane
 

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Fastlane,
Thanks for input from an experienced rider/driver. Personally,
I have no problem using premium - it is plentiful in my riding world, and the increased cost is negligible. I certainly want the engine to run properly, and to get the most out of it.
 
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