StromTrooper banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A little while back, I noticed my oil had turned milky - I changed the oil and started noticing the bike was running hot, so I also changed the coolant (unfortunately not checking coolant levels before hand).

Since changing both, the bike has started overheating at modest RPM (>60mph+ for more than a few min in 6th gear) and gets to 3 bars within ~10 minutes of driving in the city (which is my daily commute).

The one time the bike did get to red, I ended up finding the coolant was very low - I added more, drove it to work in the city for a week, then took it for a short drive on the highway to see if it was still overheating today and sure enough temperatures are getting high still (4 bars within a couple minutes @60-70mph in 6th gear).



I fear the obvious answer is a blown head gasket - but I'm lightly hopeful that perhaps there's a coolant leak and the oil got milky from winter/rainy season (CA) condensation. It has not become milky again since changing - but I also haven't put on more than a hundred or so miles since changing.

So few questions:
1) What's the best way to verify whether or not a gasket is blown?
2) If a gasket is blown, any estimates on how hard it is to change?
3) Anything else I should be checking before taking it into the shop?

Probably a crazy idea - but if the gasket is blown, my fear is that the labor fee for changing it could get kind of insane (i.e. $1-2k). The engine has ~37k miles on it - I'm tempted to just buy a new engine for ~$700 on eBay and swap out the whole thing myself (not that much of a mechanic - but very interested... :). Anyone have any experience with such jobs and how feasible it actually would be to change an engine? Biggest thing I've done so far on the bike is taking the gas tank off a few times to add more coolant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
A little while back, I noticed my oil had turned milky - I changed the oil and started noticing the bike was running hot, so I also changed the coolant (unfortunately not checking coolant levels before hand).

Since changing both, the bike has started overheating

The one time the bike did get to red, I ended up finding the coolant was very low - I added more, drove it to work in the city for a week, then took it for a short drive on the highway to see if it was still overheating today and sure enough temperatures are getting high still (4 bars within a couple minutes @60-70mph in 6th gear).


I fear the obvious answer is a blown head gasket - but I'm lightly hopeful that perhaps there's a coolant leak and the oil got milky from winter/rainy season (CA) condensation. It has not become milky again since changing
Milky oil is a sure sign of coolant being whipped in. BUT, you say it hasn't been milky since changing coolant -- yet, the bike overheats. First and simplest thing: be sure you filled the coolant completely when you changed it. It is easy to have an air pocket left in the system, and you think you got it full. When that first ride is over and the engine is cooling, it will suck coolant from the overflow into that air pocket. So it may appear to you the next morning that you are low on coolant, when in fact you just didn't get all the air out to begin with. You've since refilled the overflow bottle, right? So your levels should be right. If it is leaking through a head gasket, your oil will get milky again right quick. I'd ride it again and watch for signs of milky oil. Let's hope you simply had an air pocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Another idea....Make sure the overflow line is not cracked at the connection points at the radiator or at the bottle. If it is the bike will overheat and push coolant into the overflow bottle but will not suck it back into the radiator when it cools down. What you will see is an full or over full overflow bottle and a Radiator that is low or empty of coolant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,380 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

The milky oil is more likely condensation since your commute is short and the bike barely gets to operating temperature. Let's hope its that. It is very rare to hear about a blown head gasket. Occasionally there is a leaking fuel pump but that leak normally drains to the ground, not into the oil.

How did you determine that the bike was overheating when all this trouble started? What were the symptoms/ readings.

Yarz I think has it right on the money. It can be a bit of a struggle to get the air out of the system. When the bike is cold check the coolant level in the radiator. It should be right at the top. If not you still have air in the system. At times it helps to compress some of the hoses with your hands to burp the air, careful not to overflow the radiator. If air comes out you normally see bubbles. Also some recommend to tilt the bike to both sides (without dropping it!) helping the air to migrate into the radiator from where it can escape via the overflow reservoir. You may need to do this several times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
Another way coolant can get into your oil is through a leaky coolant pump seal. Normally it collects behind the pump and drains to ground via a hose. If the exit nipple or hose is plugged by mung or insects the coolant builds up and forces its way past the shaft oil seal into the crank case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,380 Posts
Another way coolant can get into your oil is through a leaky coolant pump seal. Normally it collects behind the pump and drains to ground via a hose. If the exit nipple or hose is plugged by mung or insects the coolant builds up and forces its way past the shaft oil seal into the crank case.
Well it obviously is not the fuel pump that will leak coolant into the oil! Thanks for correcting so gracefully :)
And the stupid site does not even let be go back and correct the post ….
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top