StromTrooper banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I spent the weekend wrenching and soldering instead of riding, so my glee has now begun fulfilling its destiny as a rolling farkle platform. I found everyone's detailed photos to be very helpful as I was planning out my projects and buying parts, so I thought I'd upload some of my own.

This is what I managed to get done:

  • Suzuki OEM low seat
  • Stripped off tupperware and lifted tank
  • SW Motech centerstand
  • Suzuki OEM engine cowl
  • Richlandrick fork brace
  • EB 3CS harness
  • EB switched accessory harness
  • Powerlet 12V socket
  • Customized Zumo 660 powered mount
  • Customized Oxford Sport heated grips
Suzuki OEM low seat - Not much to say here; it comes complete and is a straight swap for the regular seat. It looks almost identical to the original, and also feels the same to me in terms of padding and comfort (I only weigh 135lbs). For me, it's the difference between being on tippy toes and getting the balls of both feet firmly planted, so I'm keeping it. It is the same width as the regular seat, so if you're looking for a dramatic difference or need the bike lowered more than half an inch, you'll have to look elsewhere. To compensate for the new, slightly lower position, I rotated my bars to bring the controls a little down and back. This also had the unintended but positive effect of putting the blinker controls closer to my thumb than the horn, which I used to keep pressing by accident.

Tank lift - Very straightforward thanks to Greywolf + the owner's manual. I took off the rack and grab handle assembly, and worked my forward from the rear quarter panels, to the side panels, to the front tank cover, and finally the side tank covers. The tank then pivots up and rests on a short prop to reveal the top of the engine (which will never be this clean, ever again). Note that only the front and side tank covers need to come off to access the engine - I removed all of the plastic to make my wiring projects easier:






SW Motech centerstand - First farkle to go on. Very simple installation with only 3 or 4 steps and easy access to the necessary bolts. The hardest part for me was stretching out the springs - I ended up rigging a handle out of a pistol-grip vise and some 14ga wire that I looped around the rear spring hook. Walking slowly backwards from the bike with this contraption, I managed to exert enough force to pull the spring onto the mounting point. The centerstand is very nicely engineered, looks good, and is well worth the price. With my OEM tire, I get about an inch of clearance for the rear tire.






Suzuki OEM engine cowl - Again, a very simple installation. This piece is mostly cosmetic, and doesn't offer much protection since it's made of plastic. But I prefer the covered-up look and, at the very least, it will keep some of the rain and mud out of nooks and crannies in the engine, plus it just might take enough sting out of something headed for the exposed oil filter.




Richlandrick fork brace - Another very good looking part. I got an email from them a couple of weeks ago saying that they had run out of these and had to fabricate some more, but it still arrived very quickly IMHO. Great service, and a great product at a reasonable price. I loosened both the pinch bolt and the fender mounting bolts, but the brace went on very easily with no tapping or pushing required. Definitely looks almost OEM!



More to come...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
you need to remove the "plastic" to do the "tank lift"?!? That SWM centerstand seems to be well built...I'll probably go with that one, instead of Suzuki's, on my next V-Strom (once i've sold my 07 V-Strom).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Eastern Beaver 3CS harness - I bought the all circuits unswitched version because I had planned to use the OEM connector for my Oxford heated grips, and prefer constant power for both my GPS and powerlet socket. I wanted to keep the underseat tray clear for my manuals, first aid kit, and repair supplies, so after digging around a bit I decided to put the fusebox in an empty space next to the coolant tank, mounted to the brace with a plastic tree clip. The first 5A circuit powers my Zumo 660, the second 15A line goes to the powerlet socket up in the dash, and the third will be for my Banshee horn once they go into production.




Eastern Beaver switched accessory harness - After messing around with the bike a little, I decided that I really didn't want to run any more current through the factory wiring for my grips, so I went back to EB to order an accessory relay. It's mounted to the left side of the frame with some industrial velcro and a couple of zipties. I originally fed it from what looks like an unused switched 12v connector that I found next to it (just poking out of the vinyl tape immediately to the left of the relay) but this seemed to do something funky to the ABS warning light which spooked me out, so I just did the old-fashioned thing and hit up the license plate light with a posi-tap, 8 inches to the rear. In hindsight, had I known I was going to wire the grips with my own power, I would have purchased a PC-8 instead of the 3CS + a relay. Live and learn.




Front end fun - Three 16ga lines go from the fusebox and relay under the seat, along the existing factory cabling to the left of the engine, to the front end.

The first line goes via the left fairing to a Powerlet socket that I drilled into the front left dash area. In the photo below, it's plugged into to my battery tender, which is why I prefer it to be unswitched.

The second line is a 5-wire harness that I fabricated for my customized Oxford heated grips + Symtec controller (more in my next post) that terminates with connectors in the right fork area.

The third goes to a female Sumitomo 2-pin connector that feeds my Zumo 660. The Garmin mount comes with a permanently attached cable that includes audio in/out and accessory lines that I will never need since I use a bluetooth receiver in my helmet. So I cut this cable to about 3 feet, terminated the unwanted wires, and crimped its 12v and ground lines into the matching male connector. 3 feet from the Zumo puts the plugs in a nice protected spot under the tank fairing near some OEM connectors. The Zumo itself is mounted to the left side of the handlebar with a RAM B-231.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
you need to remove the "plastic" to do the "tank lift"?!? That SWM centerstand seems to be well built...I'll probably go with that one, instead of Suzuki's, on my next V-Strom (once i've sold my 07 V-Strom).
Not all of it - just the three pieces immediately to the front and sides of the tank. I took off all the plastic to make wiring easier. Corrected my original post too. I really like SWM stand - at that price and since it's an easy install, there is no reason to get the OEM one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,410 Posts
Nice pics. I see you are a ready person with your survival pack under the seat.
You now have the essentiial Farkles. Enjoy the trips and (S)miles.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
I had all the front plastic off this weekend. Didn't fare so well putting screws back in the proper holes though. I'm usually pretty good at that. Not this time.

It's gotta come off again anyway when I do HID conversion and cowl gadget wiring. I'll figure out what went wrong at that point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Oxford Sport heated grips with hacked Symtec controller and custom harness - This project was the most challenging, and ended up taking several weeks, including waiting for new parts. When they first arrived, I loved the grips but took an immediate dislike to the central unit and the controller, which are ridiculously bulky. The setup also has an excessive amount of permanently-attached cable that most people end up having to ziptie into a big bundle and hide somewhere in their fairings.

I solved this problem inadvertently by screwing up during testing - I hooked up the controller to a 12v power supply backwards and without a fuse. One second later I had a nice fireworks show, a molten cable harness, and a burnt-out controller. Well, good riddance, I didn't like them anyway. I did some searching and found a tiny Symtec controller that I really liked. It cost almost as much as the grips themselves, but at this point I didn't really have much of a choice.

When it arrived, I got myself into more trouble because the Symtec is designed to replace half of the brake perch mounting clamp, and sit directly over a hole you drill in the handlebar. Four bare wires come out of the back with no waterproofing or strain relief. On the glee, you can't replace this clamp because it is also the mirror mount, so I tried to position it over the existing part. I found out the hard way just how weak those wires are after pulling them right off the circuit board. Luckily, this controller was designed to be repaired rather than disposable, so I managed to open her up, solder the wires back onto the PCB, and add proper strain relief. Problem solved!

Original grips and brake perch clamp removed:




Throttle tube ridges and other protrusions removed with a Dremel and chisel:




Finally done! This Symtec Heat Demon controller, with additional weatherproofing and strain relief, is mounted on top of the existing brake perch clamp with longer M6 bolts. Following the circuit diagrams on the Lockitt site, I fabricated a sealed harness that brings switched power from the EB relay to the controller, and then controlled power from there to the original Oxford grip connectors. The actual grips, with their permanently attached cables and connectors, are the only part of the Oxford kit I actually ended up using:




Now that it's working, this is a great and unobtrusive system with about 1/3 the number of parts that the original Oxford kit comes with. The grip heaters deliver plenty of warmth, and I love the look and location of the controls. Press four times to cycle through the heating levels and the LEDs progressively light up from yellow to red. Hold down the button for 2 seconds, and the LEDs dim for night mode. Awesome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Nice pics. I see you are a ready person with your survival pack under the seat.
You now have the essentiial Farkles. Enjoy the trips and (S)miles.
Thanks, that's the plan. Just missing some luggage at the moment...


It's gotta come off again anyway when I do HID conversion and cowl gadget wiring. I'll figure out what went wrong at that point.
Can't wait to see how your HIDs and front end gadgets turn out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Looks great, I'm about to install the Oxford heated grips too. Did you use the supplied glue or something else?


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Looks great, I'm about to install the Oxford heated grips too. Did you use the supplied glue or something else?
IMHO stay away from the supplied stuff, which is just cheap superglue. I got lazy, used it first, and immediately regretted it - thin, runny, oozed out, and dripped all over my garage floor. Basic cyanoacrylate also has very low shear strength, which means that with enough force (hmmm...spirited hairpin? emergency braking?) it fails catastrophically.

Sure enough after 24 hours curing, I gave the clutch side grip a good strong twist -and crack, round she went.

Go to the hardware store and get an impact-resistant (rubberized) cyanoacrylate. Gel is better - sticks to the bars and stays under the grip where it belongs. I ended up using Gorilla Superglue. Loctite Gel or Krazy Glue Advanced are similar products. I also roughed up the inside of the grips with some medium grit sandpaper.

Some folks use two-part epoxy but you have to be careful with those, as some variants don't bond well to the relatively hard plastic inside the Oxfords.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Thanks for the images! They are very helpful.

I'm in the process of installing the Eastern Beaver 3CS and Dual Headlight Relay Kit. I was set on having the 3CS fuse-holder in an empty space to the left of the battery as per the instructions, but having seen your placement I like that better.

Did you have to modify the 3CS to allow for your placement? Did you use a simple fastener pushed into the slot on the back of the fuse-holder to attach it to the existing hole in the tank support?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Nice write up!
i too kinda wish i had done the PC-8 instead of the 3CS - live and learn i guess. More is never enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Looking good. Feedback on the feel of the forkbrace please....+1 on the SW Motech centerstand. Like this one alot.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top