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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #1
Since I'm in the process of swapping my old rear shock for an OEM one rebuilt and upgraded by Sasquatch, some notes that may be helpful to anyone doing this in the future. Regardless of whether you have a Sasquatch-rebuilt shock, or do a full aftermarket replacement.

Not sure how much of this applies to DL1000's past 2009. There was no DL1000 for the 2010 model year (as far as I can tell), and the part number of the shock changes after the 2009 DL1000 (last of the "K" series).

Anyway, some observations:

--centerstand is EXTREMELY useful here. A lift is great too. Sucks being hunched up on the floor of the garage.

--relevant socket sizes: 10mm (preload adjustment knob mounts); 14mm (heads of long bolts through "dog bones"); 17mm (nuts on ends of "dog bone" bolts).

--There is an overhead plastic clip (09403-10313) that's supposed to keep the preload adjustment hose secured. My clip has been broken since forever. It was so brittle that it broke off completely, when I tried to open it to put the hose back in. Probably doesn't matter. The hose is pretty stiff, has a tough protective sheath, & tends to not touch anything, once installed.

--you need to remove the "dog bones" ("cushion lever rods" in Suzuki shop-manual-speak) because they are in the way of the lower shock mounting bolt.

--doing so will vary in difficulty, depending on any corrosion.

--I needed a 3', 1/2" drive breaker bar to get the end nuts on the "dog bone" bolts moving. And to keep the nuts moving, the next several turns.

--Once the nuts were off, I used a drift punch to gently tap the long bolts out through the other side of the "knuckle."

--For the upper "dog bone" bolt, the exhaust will get in the way. Use a jack, block of wood, etc. to raise the swingarm as high as it will go. You're not fighting the compression of the rear shock at this point (since it's disconnected from the swingarm), only its weight. This will raise the upper end of the dog bone with respect to the exhaust, which is fixed to the frame (and, as always, gets in the way when doing maintenance!). Then you will have just enough room to pull the long bolt out all the way, and can remove the left-side "dog bone."

Now that I have the "dog bones" off, maybe I can actually swap the shock. Sheesh!

--The "dog bones" do not have any particular orientation or sided-ness, as far as I can tell. Reinstall whichever way. I'd replace them if there is significant wear, but mine looked OK once I got all the grime off.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Part 2:

--you're going to need universal-joint adapters for your sockets. There are few fasteners that you can get to straight from the side.

--I didn't find it necessary to remove the rear wheel.

--Getting the shock out past the exhaust & swingarm is a bit of a puzzle, but can be done. What worked for me was to have the top of the shock to the left of the mount point (looking from back of bike), angling the bottom to the right, and slipping the shock out past the exhaust to the right.


Old shock is now off and new shock will go in once I take a break.
 

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...
--I didn't find it necessary to remove the rear wheel.
I find that removing the wheel makes the job easier, well worth the small amount of time it takes.

Lube linkage bearings while you have access to them.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #4
How does removing the rear wheel help? It's not in the way in the least.

It's the exhaust that's in the way.

I can't get the new shock on, so I'm going to have to put the old one back on anyway. Oh well.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #5
Also, the rebuilt shock came back with a nearly cracked-through preload adjust hose. WTF. Emailed Sasquatch to ask about getting that corrected.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
OK, so by cranking the preload down as far as it will go, I managed to get the rebuilt shock in place.

I don't really want to install it though. I can touch up the scratches on the (red-plastic-coated) Eibach spring with Rustoleum or whatever. But the cracked hose...dude, that shouldn't have happened. But I'll stop there. To be fair to the guy I want to give him a chance to respond & make it right.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
OK, we worked something out. Rebuilt shock installed.

Turns out you can swap the preload adjust hoses from one shock to another without too much drama. Technically you "should" bleed after but as long as you start with preload at "none" there's no pressure, so you lose maybe a drop or two of oil at most. Not going to worry about it unless the preload starts acting wonky.

Still not a fan of removing the rear wheel for this, but to each his own.
 

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Wow, such trouble, Jay and i changed my rebuilt shock out in a dirt lot of a camp ground with minimal effort. Piece o' pie! We didn't drop the rear wheel either. Such talented hands we have!:ROFLMAO:
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Lucky you. This wasn't as much of a PITA as the steering bearing swap last summer, but it was close.

FWIW I'm really glad I read the thread here:


My DL1000 also has needle bearings in the suspension joints, so I was super careful not to push them out when I was cleaning and re-greasing the spacers.

Went for a test ride with the new shock. First thing I noticed was that the bike didn't sag like a worn-out flophouse mattress when I climbed on - nice!

Overall, not a huge difference riding solo other than the annoying softness is gone. Going over bumps got better after I had the forks rebuilt, now both ends are properly sprung. Huzzah!

If I can get the clutch un-messed-up she'll be in great shape for some nice long rides this summer.
 

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How does removing the rear wheel help? It's not in the way in the least.

It's the exhaust that's in the way.

I can't get the new shock on, so I'm going to have to put the old one back on anyway. Oh well.
Just gives a little more working room. Personal preference, but I like having less crap in the way. Plus you get a chance to check the wheel and sprocket carrier bearings and give the rear brake pads a good look.

Really, this boils down to maintenance philosophy and is a by-product of my racing days. If I'm not pressed for time (as in, I've crashed, and have 30 minutes to get the bike fixed enough to pass tech before the next race) I like to do that little bit of extra disassembly, both to make the job easier and to give myself an opportunity to make sure that other stuff in the area is right.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,243 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ride is MUUUUCH better now. SO-approved.

BTW I think I have the clutch thing licked. Looks like my old slave cylinder is so worn that it's binding at random. Will fix that by installing a new SC assembly.
 
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