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As the weather started to get colder my commute has become frustrating.

The bike starts fine and warms up at idle (1300) in my garage fine. Getting out of my neighborhood, no problem, after a short period of around 50mph for a few miles I come to my first stop and bam...Idle goes from what was a solid 1300 to dead. If I catch it in time, I can draw the clutch and nurse it up to a point where I can throttle out of a stopped position. If it does stall, it will start back up without issue.

Not sure if outside temperature has anything to do with this but it started first at one stop then nothing for the rest of the ride. This morning, temps at 25ºF (-4ºC) it was acting weird throughout the whole commute.

Thoughts?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The two biggest reasons for a 2007 or later 650 to die at idle are the clutch lever switch being bypassed and a worn TPS. Also, it's bad for the engine, your wallet and the environment to idle it to warm up and may contribute to an early TPS demise. You're much better off riding it right away and keeping it under 5000rpm until you see a heat bar or two.
 

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Also, it's bad for the engine, your wallet and the environment to idle it to warm up and may contribute to an early TPS demise.
Interesting, I didn't know this. Whats the rational behind the early TPS demise GW?

I've always warmed up before you go on cool days. Also, I idle for 30 seconds prior to shutdown if at operating temperature and especially if you been running a four stroke engine hard...old habits I suppose...
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Those old habits applied to carburetors. Fuel injection is entirely different.

TPSs get worn by keeping the throttle in one position while the engine is running. A TPS is basically a potentiometer, a variable resistor that slides a metal wiper along a carbon track. The greatest degree of wear the wiper causes comes from the wiper vibrating on one point on the track. The wiper spends more time in the idle position than any other, causing more problems at idle than any other position. Warming up an engine by idling it causes much more TPS wear at the idle position.

Engine wear is greatest when cold. An engine warms up much faster when under load. Moving within a few seconds of starting greatly reduces the cold running time as well as TPS wear at the idle position.
 

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Good to know about the TPS. Thanks Greywolf.
Never have let my engines idle more than 30 sec. and subscribe to your theory. Even the big diesel semis I drove were never idled more than 5 min.
 

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How difficult is it to replace the TPS (time and money wise). I am having the same problem and thought it was just due to low temperatures.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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You remove the tank and take off the old TPS using a security Torx bit. Make sure its O-ring is removed too as the new TPS comes with a new O-ring. Try to get the new TPS mounted in the same position as the old one. Put the bike in dealer mode by jumping the white/red wire to ground or a black/white wire on the dealer mode coupler. Warm up the bike and watch the dash on the -C00 display. It needs to be centered at idle and climb up at 1500-1800 rpm on a DL1000 or around 2500rpm on a DL650. It’s a very touchy adjustment that can move even just tightening the screw. It takes about a half second for the dash position to catch up to the rpm change so move the throttle slowly.
 

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You remove the tank and take off the old TPS using a security Torx bit. Make sure its O-ring is removed too as the new TPS comes with a new O-ring. Try to get the new TPS mounted in the same position as the old one. Put the bike in dealer mode by jumping the white/red wire to ground or a black/white wire on the dealer mode coupler. Warm up the bike and watch the dash on the -C00 display. It needs to be centered at idle and climb up at 1500-1800 rpm on a DL1000 or around 2500rpm on a DL650. It’s a very touchy adjustment that can move even just tightening the screw. It takes about a half second for the dash position to catch up to the rpm change so move the throttle slowly.
Thanks for the information. I think the cold weather has killed my battery. I suspect that the battery was failing from the beginning (I've had the bike for about a month) and that might have been causing the issues I've been having. I just got a battery tender and will probably pick up a new battery on Wednesday. Hopefully that addresses things otherwise I will check on replacing the TPS. I just got my service manual so I will see if there is a voltage or resistance check that confirm the diagnosis.
 

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You can take the battery to an auto parts store that does free load testing. The battery needs to be under load for a proper test.
 

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Have you checked that your battery terminals are clean and tight ?

They tend to work loose on bikes and can cause running issues.
 

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Does it happen just when you're starting to turn the throttle to get going again?

Sent from my SM-N950W using Tapatalk
 

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Engine warm up ........good for your engine

It's not a case of old habbits....

I come from an aviation background and standard procedure is to idle the engine to warm up the engine. Engines are mechanical devices that require lubrication. Indeed large radial engines were often fitted with an oil dilution system where petrol was mixed with the oil at the pump to reduce the viscosity of the oil to ensure some lubrication reaches all the oil galleries. As the engine warms up the petrol evaporates out of the oil.
Yes the operating clearances are not optimal in a cold engine and oil viscosity is high thus oil distribution is not optimal and wear takes place. Engine load also affects wear. I wouldn't put a cold engine under load.
With some of the very low temperatures I see in posts I would consider a warm up period essential - at least until you see 2 - 3 bars on the engine temp gauge.
I live in a temperate climate region ( Sydney Australia was 44C yesterday) and 3 bars is achieved in a matter of secs.

I have no experience with the TPS but a two minute warm up at idle only equates to the wait at a couple of traffic lights and is really not that significant a factor in wear of the TPS - just my thoughts

It's a personal choice but .......... well maybe old ha:cheers2:bits
 

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The problem with idling to warm up is it takes much longer so you are spending more time running a cold engine. An engine warms up faster under a light load so it's best to ride after only a few seconds it may take to get oil pressure up through all galleries. Just keep the engine under about 5000rpm until you see an indication of normal operating temperature. BTW, you might wait forever to see three bars on an a Vee and two is fine to exercise a Strom engine at higher revs. Just keep the revs under about half red line on any fuel injected motor vehicle and you'll warm up much faster. A motorcycle engine is very compact and oil doesn't have a long way to travel.

Google "don't idle to warm up" and you'll find many articles explaining how idling to warm up is a bad idea for fuel injected engines. It is an old idea from the days of carburetors and things have changed. Fuel injection systems add the proper amount of fuel to their engines for the ambient air temperature and they don't need to be idled like carbureted engines did.
 

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No need to warm up .......not convinced

The problem with idling to warm up is it takes much longer so you are spending more time running a cold engine. An engine warms up faster under a light load so it's best to ride after only a few seconds it may take to get oil pressure up through all galleries. Just keep the engine under about 5000rpm until you see an indication of normal operating temperature. BTW, you might wait forever to see three bars on an a Vee and two is fine to exercise a Strom engine at higher revs. Just keep the revs under about half red line on any fuel injected motor vehicle and you'll warm up much faster. A motorcycle engine is very compact and oil doesn't have a long way to travel.

Google "don't idle to warm up" and you'll find many articles explaining how idling to warm up is a bad idea for fuel injected engines. It is an old idea from the days of carburetors and things have changed. Fuel injection systems add the proper amount of fuel to their engines for the ambient air temperature and they don't need to be idled like carbureted engines did.
G'day Greywolf,
Googled it. It's a generalisation but it appears that the "greenies" have hijacked the concept of don't idle, based on pollution effects and not engine wear.. They throw in push button start to save fuel but more importantly to reduce pollution and also claim catalytic converter damage from idling.
A carburettor fuel sysytem requires a choke to give an excessively rich mixture when cold. Once up to temp just remove choke. The carbureted engine may run slightly off stoichiometric mixture and thus mile/gallon and pollution will be affected.
A fuel injected fuel system has the ECU mapped to give excessively rich mixture and automatically reverts to a stoichiometric mixture (controlled by sensors) once 40F is reached thus increasing fuel efficiency (mpg) and reducing exhaust emissions. So a fuel injected system is obviously the superior fuel system.

Both systems, when cold will add extra fuel that does have the ability to wash oil from the cylinder walls.
To me it is reasonable to expect the engine under the highest load to wear more.
Even an easy riding load is far greater than an idle load.

Did a quick test - took under 2 mins to get two bars. On my last ride 3 bars was the norm.

I couldn't find any empirical data to substantiate either view so Ill stick with my years of experience and continue to warm up a cold engine. It may not be necessary but it WON'T do any harm.

cheers :cheers2:
 
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