StromTrooper banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I recently purchased my first V-Strom (06 DL1000) and I have to say it's the most fun I've had on a motorcycle. I'm looking for advice on brand recommendations for the best chain and sprockets for my 06 DL1000. Is the O-ring chain the way to go? I also wanted to confirm the chain size as 525. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
As a general rule, o-ring and x-ring chains last quite a bit longer than conventional chains. If you are religious about cleaning and lubing your non-sealed chain it would be a much closer race. Automatic oiler would also help a non-sealed chain quite a bit. A bit messy, but very effective.

I believe the stock setup is 525 chain and 112 links. Some people upgrade to 530 chain and claim longer lifespan. I have no experience or opinion on such an upgrade.

And welcome to the forum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
The false economy comes from using cheap basic chain without the o-rings. You'd have to adjust them frequently and they will wear out fast. For the better chains, you'll adjust them once at the first hundred miles then check them at every cleaning/re-oiling.
May not be the best, the most bang for the buck would be the JT brand of x-ring chains and sprockets. The whole shebang with chain, sprocket set and all is maybe $150. Available as a 525 kit or 530, and in different gearing (number of teeth) configurations should you wish to wander from stock.
(More teeth on the front cog, fewer RPM at given speed, more teeth on the rear cog = more RPM, good for off-road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
As a general rule, o-ring and x-ring chains last quite a bit longer than conventional chains. If you are religious about cleaning and lubing your non-sealed chain it would be a much closer race. Automatic oiler would also help a non-sealed chain quite a bit. A bit messy, but very effective.

I believe the stock setup is 525 chain and 112 links. Some people upgrade to 530 chain and claim longer lifespan. I have no experience or opinion on such an upgrade.

And welcome to the forum!
Non o-ring chain life? NOT EVEN CLOSE. Sealed chain links revolutionized chain drive. A DID Xring chain in 525 will handle more horsepower than a VeeStrom will generate. Not to worry.
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
2,876 Posts
Another fan of Sprocket Center here.

They make it very easy to get everything at once and get it correct. They will even cut the chain to the correct number of links for the bike, if needed.

There's nothing wrong with getting the OEM sprocket & chain set. IIRC it comes in "endless" chain format, which saves you the hassle of doing a master link. The main reason I didn't get the OEM set was that I didn't want to wait 2+ weeks for OEM parts. My old chain had dropped some rollers (yeah, pretty alarming!), so the bike was parked until I could get a new chain on.

FWIW, I am on my 2nd set of JT sprockets. The chain wore out before the sprockets did last time. Have about 12000 miles on the "new" chain (DID 525VX) and it's still in great shape.

I do lube it religiously. Owner's manual states lube every 600 miles for the OEM chain, DID said every 300 miles for their chain so I do the latter.

Since I know it'll come up: I would either get one of the EK chains that uses a screw-on master link, or buy the DID KMR-500 chain tool if you want a riveted master link.

I used the Motion Pro PBR (Press-Break-Rivet) combination tool for my one chain swap so far. It was fine for breaking the master link on the old chain to get it off, but inferior for riveting the new one. Mainly due to the lopsided heavy design, and the handle being way too small for the job. That'll make more sense if you ever try to rivet a master link with a PBR.

I also recommend use of an impact driver to break loose the old sprocket nut. Other methods either didn't work for me (rear brake is not strong enough to hold the wheel still against a breaker bar), or seemed too likely to damage the bike in some way (jamming wood in the rear wheel against the swingarm).
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top