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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Strommers!

I've had my 2005 650 for maybe 3 years now. Bought it with 39,000 miles, now over 60k. I've read in the reviews how slick shifting the tranny is, but ever since I've owned mine the shifting is intermittently clunky and stiff. I'd say over half the time I have to pull significantly harder on the lever than is normal, finding neutral is difficult, etc. Sometimes it does indeed shift very easily and smooth. It's a night and day difference.

Some facts:
- Have run both Rotella T 15w40 and Mobile 1 10w40, no difference
- I don't notice any difference in this based on the mileage on the oil change
- The clutch is smooth, normal, consistent in its action, and adjusted properly
- I thoroughly cleaned and greased the shifter pivot and linkage joints, no difference

I did a search and didn't come up with this exact issue. Has anybody else run across this? Thanks!

Jeremy
 

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Hello Strommers!

I've had my 2005 650 for maybe 3 years now. Bought it with 39,000 miles, now over 60k. I've read in the reviews how slick shifting the tranny is, but ever since I've owned mine the shifting is intermittently clunky and stiff. I'd say over half the time I have to pull significantly harder on the lever than is normal, finding neutral is difficult, etc. Sometimes it does indeed shift very easily and smooth. It's a night and day difference.

Some facts:
- Have run both Rotella T 15w40 and Mobile 1 10w40, no difference
- I don't notice any difference in this based on the mileage on the oil change
- The clutch is smooth, normal, consistent in its action, and adjusted properly
- I thoroughly cleaned and greased the shifter pivot and linkage joints, no difference

I did a search and didn't come up with this exact issue. Has anybody else run across this? Thanks!

Jeremy
I had this issue. Do this:

https://www.stromtrooper.com/4718337-post37.html
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks fellas, good stuff to check. The clutch adjustment at the sprocket is particularly compelling, and I'm about to install a chain and sprockets anyway.

Do you guys understand how the chain slack affects this?
 

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Do you guys understand how the chain slack affects this?
I wouldn't suggest it if it would not be of any help. On it own, it will not do much but in doing a clutch adjustment only you may find that the problem is not resolved. Try the chain adjustment as well and let me know what you think. Of course once you have checked for clutch cable binding.
 

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A chain that is too loose can contribute to driveline lash, making it more difficult to be smooth when releasing the clutch after shifting. You risk accelerating wear on the countershaft bearings when road irregularities cause your suspension to flex if your chain is tighter than specified in your owner’s manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Folks,

Update: I adjusted the clutch and tightened the chain just a bit. (The chain really needs to be replaced, hopefully this Saturday.) But I think the shifting is a little better. Interesting, I found the adjustment at the engine to be right at 1/4 turn per spec, I adjusted to a "tight" quarter turn, maybe 3/16 of a turn :D Then adjusted the bar cable end adjuster per the manual, ~1/2" free play.

I still find it interesting that this bike, after all the reviews of how slick the tranny is, can be so persnickity about tiny little adjustments.

Does the chain tension's contribution to notchy shifting tend to be from being too loose or too tight?

OH, and where can I find the tool (rods) for aligning the rear wheel?

Thanks again, Jeremy
 

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Visual aid on chain tension, google "youtube + v-strom chain adjustment" or follow instructions in your user manual.
As posted before, too much slack can be dangerous and too little slack can cause leaks or chain to snap.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, I'll check it out.

I'm not trying to be impertinent, but my question on chain slack is this: Does the chain tension's contribution to notchy shifting tend to be from being too loose or too tight?

I understand the other implications of bad chain tension. But it was suggested specifically that it can cause / contribute to notchy shifting. When it contributes to notchy shifting, is it usually too tight or too loose?

Thanks!
 

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Both in fact. Too loose and sometimes it feels like the clutch does not want to release and that you have to double clutch when shifting from 2nd to 1st, at a stop. Too tight and the feed-back from the chain is felt with each gear change, plus the chain will sound and feel as though it is has bad links that are sticking / notching on the sprocket. I won't bother to list the side effects / damage either settings could do, since it has been discussed before.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks fellas.

Does that chain alignment tools work well? I thought there would be a pair of rods, 1 that goes thru the wheel axle and one that goes thru the swingarm pivot.

BTW, guywiththechickens, that is a funny screen name! 😉
 

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Thanks fellas.

Does that chain alignment tools work well? I thought there would be a pair of rods, 1 that goes thru the wheel axle and one that goes thru the swingarm pivot.

BTW, guywiththechickens, that is a funny screen name! 😉
Yes. It tightens against the rear sprocket face, so that's the reference plane. Then you squat behind the bike and visually line up the rod (pointing forward) with the chain as it heads toward the front sprocket. Close one eye and verify constant spacing between the chain edge and rod for the whole length of the chain. Much easier to do than describe. Works great.
 

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This an incredibly interesting subject (at least to me).

The Gen 1 DL1000 has a systemic issue that causes rough shifting between first and second, and eventually if unaddressed hard shifting between second and third. Some really smart people in Europe noticed also that the chain and sprockets sets were wearing out in about 11K miles. The rear sprockets were also excessively worn in the inside.

The cush rubbers inside the wheel were allowing the sprocket carrier to to be pulled forward on the rear end. This caused the chain to wear heavily against the inside of the sprocket. It not only wore these parts faster than normal, but caused the hard clunky shifting.

It makes sense that no matter the cause of the misaligned sprocket, a misaligned sprocket would cause the same shifting symptoms. The root cause (ill fitting cush runners) may or may not be the same, but the misalignment exists the same down stream symptoms should show up (hard shifting).

https://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,1499.0.html

DL1000 Rear Wheel Spacer Exchange - AdventureTech, LLC.
 

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Sorry, "rear sprocket drum" part #5 here



The cush rubbers are the culprit. Too small or not durable enough, but they eventually wear and allow more than the appropriate amount movement of the "rear sprocket drum."

The solution on the DL1000 prior to 2012 is to machine the sprocket carrier 2mm shorter and add a 2mm spacer between the left spacer (part #9) and the swing arm.

While this is a necessary modification for the DL1000 (every one of them prior to 2012 need it), I'm unaware of anyone ever doing it on a DL650.
 

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GearheadS,

I had similar hard shifting in my 05 650 with relatively low miles.

Try this- Do a little clutch slipping warm up. Don't go crazy with it, but give the clutch a modest slip to warm things up. If your bike then snicks neatly in & out of gear, then you may want to try a new set of clutch fiber plates. My thoughts are that the clutch fiber plates can become coated & impregnated with a gooey oil residue which maintains a surface dragging contact condition, rather than allowing the steel & fiber plates to spin/slide freely.

I've owned several Yam 250F dirt bikes (YZF & WRF). Those bikes are notorious for dragging clutches and hard shifting. Whenever the shifting became worse, I'd change the oil (not brands, just fresh oil) and the fresh oil would clear up the shifting issues.

I doubt that chain tension has anything to do with the condition you are describing.

Hope this helps.

Bz Joe
 
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