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Any advice finding neutral waiting at long lights? What technique do you use? I keep skipping it. Also sometimes if in neutral before the bike stops it won't go into first if I don't roll the bike slightly or can take off in second. Finally I have to squeeze the clutch a little tighter now when starting the bike how can I adjust it so I don't need to death grip it to start the bike?
 

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Check your clutch level operation and clean and grease the pivot if required, check your cable slack and that it slides in it's sheath with very little effort, and check the clutch actuator rod clearance and that the rod isn't gunk'd up or binding for any reason.

It might also just be time for an oil change.
 

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My Neutral seems difficult to find too.

Bike was serviced when it was at the dealer and I've only owned it for a few weeks.
I'm gonna chalk it up to my noobishness, but it does seem that the force necessary to get it over the detent from 1st up or from 2nd down is enough to push the lever past neutral.
 

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My bike had a very notchy transmission when it was new. I found the shifting action very clunky - a few times it felt like something must be mechanically wrong with it.

It smoothed out after a few thousand miles. Others here have related similar experiences.
 

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My bike had a very notchy transmission when it was new. I found the shifting action very clunky - a few times it felt like something must be mechanically wrong with it.

It smoothed out after a few thousand miles. Others here have related similar experiences.
Mine has over 6500 miles on it. I bought it used.
 

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Mine has over 6500 miles on it. I bought it used.
Huh. Are you sure the dealer actually serviced it? Check the clutch free play.

I think mine sorted itself out well before 6500 miles - like maybe 2 or 3k - and I have many stories about dealers not doing things they were 'supposed' to do.
 

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Huh. Are you sure the dealer actually serviced it? Check the clutch free play.

I think mine sorted itself out well before 6500 miles - like maybe 2 or 3k - and I have many stories about dealers not doing things they were 'supposed' to do.
Oil looks clean.
Clutch cable tension is per the Owner's Manual.

I highly doubt that anything they did or didn't do would have any affect on engine/gearbox internals. Either it's previous owner's lack of maintenance (Not likely. First service was at 650 miles and others were on time thereafter.) Otherwise it's a defect.
 

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Oil looks clean.
Clutch cable tension is per the Owner's Manual.

I highly doubt that anything they did or didn't do would have any affect on engine/gearbox internals. Either it's previous owner's lack of maintenance (Not likely. First service was at 650 miles and others were on time thereafter.) Otherwise it's a defect.
If the clutch isn't releasing enough neutral can be a right beyotch to find on most bikes, the Stromms are no different.
There are two clearance adjustments in the clutch, the cable slack is one, the actuator rod is the other. Both need to be right. Another thing that MIGHT help is to switch to one grade lighter oil, saw 5W40 instead of 10W40, or 10W40 instead of 15W40. It could be the clutch is just dragging a little in the oil.
 

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It's normal to have to move the bike slightly forward or backward to find neutral from a stop. I find it easier to shift from second to neutral while still moving forward; just a light downward tap from second, with or without clutch, gets it every time.

It's often similarly necessary to roll the bike slightly to engage first.

Both issues are related to how the shift dogs happen to line up as you stop. Totally normal.
 

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... the cable slack is one, the actuator rod is the other.
...

This is something that needs to be repeated.

Adjusting the clutch cable does not adjust the clutch release point unless there is no slack in the cable at all. It only adjusts when the cable starts moving the clutch release mechanism. If a clutch is dragging the adjustment is done within the housing that has the final drive sprocket in it.

And normally having a hard time finidng neutral (or hearing a real big clunk when put into first from netutral) are signs of the clutch dragging. A new bike might have a harder time and may just need some break in.

..Tom
 

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The problem with the Glee is a clutch adjustment requires removing the engine cover. It's a much bigger task than on the Wee.
 

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This is something that needs to be repeated.

Adjusting the clutch cable does not adjust the clutch release point unless there is no slack in the cable at all. It only adjusts when the cable starts moving the clutch release mechanism. If a clutch is dragging the adjustment is done within the housing that has the final drive sprocket in it.

And normally having a hard time finidng neutral (or hearing a real big clunk when put into first from netutral) are signs of the clutch dragging. A new bike might have a harder time and may just need some break in.

..Tom
It's not a real big clunk when I engage 1st. But it is a noticeable clunk and I do notice that the bike kicks forward when I engage 1st with the engine running.

It feels like a car does when it has bad synchros.
Could the previous owner have trashed the synchros in the transmission in 6500 miles?!

I've never even seen trashed 1st gear synchros... It's usually 2nd and 5th on cars.


If the clutch is dragging, could it be a bad pilot bearing or bushing, or is it more than likely a clearance issue?
 

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That's not how motorcycle transmissions work. There are no real synchos. They are constant mesh sequential gearboxes. The reason you get a clunk is the wet multi plate clutch. Even when the clutch is disengaged, the plates influence each other due to the oil bath. In fact, the first time you engage first from neutral, the plates are basically glued together with cold oil and get "broken" apart on that initial engagement.

Look at the clutch diagram at 2012 Suzuki V-Strom (DL650A) CLUTCH | MRCycles

and transmission at 2012 Suzuki V-Strom (DL650A) TRANSMISSION | MRCycles
 

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My VTX 1800 made a pretty good "clunk" going into first. It scared my brother a bit first time he rode it.

G26

Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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That's not how motorcycle transmissions work. There are no real synchos. They are constant mesh sequential gearboxes. The reason you get a clunk is the wet multi plate clutch. Even when the clutch is disengaged, the plates influence each other due to the oil bath. In fact, the first time you engage first from neutral, the plates are basically glued together with cold oil and get "broken" apart on that initial engagement.

Look at the clutch diagram at 2012 Suzuki V-Strom (DL650A) CLUTCH | MRCycles

and transmission at 2012 Suzuki V-Strom (DL650A) TRANSMISSION | MRCycles
Awesome explanation as usual GW. Thanks!
 

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sometimes if in neutral before the bike stops it won't go into first if I don't roll the bike slightly or can take off in second.
When ever that happens simply release the clutch and grab it again. The bike doesn't like to go into first if it's been rolled in neutral.

I can duplicate this by starting the bike in N and duck walking it out of the garage with the clutch engaged. If I do this I'll always have to release and re-grab.

Be sure you are going threw the gears as you slow down. You always want to be in the correct gear to just go if you no longer need to stop or suddenly need to change lanes for whatever reason.
 

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Most motorcycle transmissions shift easier if either the bike is still rolling or the engine is off.

As you come up to a stop you should always downshift into first gear. If it is a long stop ie: train crossing, road construction and so on, and there is a line of cars/trucks backed up behind you then put it into neutral, otherwise keep it in first, you never know when you'll have to bail.

A clunk that you describe ( bike lurches ahead ) would indicate to me that the clutch needs adjustment. As to Harleys ( my previous bike ) they clunk, that's the nature of the beast.
 

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As you come up to a stop you should always downshift into first gear. If it is a long stop ie: train crossing, road construction and so on, and there is a line of cars/trucks backed up behind you then put it into neutral, otherwise keep it in first, you never know when you'll have to bail.
+1

Come to think of it, the only time I am ever in neutral is just before starting the engine. I stay in gear all the time. And I have a very strong grip on my left hand!

My right hand has always had a good grip, I suppose. :biggrinjester:
 

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When I first noticed, I got freaked out. Now, when it happens I just ease the clutch a bit pull it back in and it slips into first. There is a bit of thump or deep clunk when it goes into first when I first start riding. It clunks going 1-2 but I believe it's because it has to go past neutral. Other gears go in smooth just a little silent click.
 
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