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Discussion Starter #1
Finally realizing that the forks are leaking, mostly the right side it seems, I am going to order new dust and oil seals along with 2 slide metal parts. Aside from the fork oil I would like to know what more I may need. I changed the fork oil at 30,000 miles by removing and inverting the tubes, and at the time I re-assembled them, but I did not replace any seals, etc. At any rate I will report back when job is complete.
 

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I did it last year on my sons gen-1 650 and can't really remember what special tools I needed or used other than a plastic device designed to slip the new seals over the tubes without doing damage to them.

Black Lab has the best step by step instruction to help you with what you need and how to get it done. If I can find the link I'll come back here and add it to this post.

Here you go... https://blacklabadventures.com/2012/04/14/replacing-front-fork-seals/
 

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Finally realizing that the forks are leaking, mostly the right side it seems, I am going to order new dust and oil seals along with 2 slide metal parts. Aside from the fork oil I would like to know what more I may need. I changed the fork oil at 30,000 miles by removing and inverting the tubes, and at the time I re-assembled them, but I did not replace any seals, etc. At any rate I will report back when job is complete.
As a hindsight dust actually causes most fork seal leaks. If you disassemble the fork but don't replace seals you should clean the seals and dust covers.

Just an FYI
 
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When I rebulid forks I replace the dust seal, oil seal, fork cap o-ring, upper and lower bushings, and the small copper sealing ring on the bolt in the bottom of the lower stanchion.
 

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All great advice here. I'm going to go down the gaiters route when I have time to drop the forks out for an oil change and I also like to replace more than just the seals; both bushes, dust seals and copper washer are all a good idea. :smile2:

You may already have all the tools you need but I have never used a seal driver to drive the seals or the bush as the drivers tend to be expensive and I've had a fair few bikes all with differing fork diameters.

I've always done it using electrical tape. Never had an issue. Works on all diameters as well. Look on Youtube for a quick guide.
 

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Thanks for the info fellow strommers. I have taken apart the left fork, but in trying to assemble the fork I probably ruined the lower part. I believe the guide metal part that I tried to re-use did not go where I tried to install it. I have not seen anyone else with this problem so I assume I screwed up the job by trying to force the guide metal into the recess on the lower fork.

So now the guide metal "sleeve" is stuck in the lower fork. It is not fully seated, but it is warped and the inner fork does not slide in. Since I now have to buy or find another lower I may pound it in, but that probably won't work. Taking it out will almost certainly ruin the lower unless a shop can do it. Will have to think about for awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I will take apart the right fork and see what happens. I don't know what happened with the left side, but it will probably be the same on the right. No telling what I will do then.
 

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Thanks for the info fellow strommers. I have taken apart the left fork, but in trying to assemble the fork I probably ruined the lower part. I believe the guide metal part that I tried to re-use did not go where I tried to install it. I have not seen anyone else with this problem so I assume I screwed up the job by trying to force the guide metal into the recess on the lower fork.

So now the guide metal "sleeve" is stuck in the lower fork. It is not fully seated, but it is warped and the inner fork does not slide in. Since I now have to buy or find another lower I may pound it in, but that probably won't work. Taking it out will almost certainly ruin the lower unless a shop can do it. Will have to think about for awhile.
Hmmm....I slide the inner fork tube (with the bushing on the bottom installed) into the lower leg then slide the guide metal bushing over the tube followed by the spacer (washer) and tap it in using PVC pipe. It sounds like you may have installed the guide metal bushing before dropping the tube into the lower leg. If so, fork won't slide in with it's bushing installed. I did this job last week, one guide bushing went in easily, the other fought me. It's not unusual for them to sometimes be a little tough to seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good observation om28, I believe I tried that first, but who knows now? I managed to get the guide metal part out of the fork thank God, and I may be able to salvage it. So I ordered two guide (oem) metals and a couple of copper washers for good effect from Partzilla.com.

I removed the guide with a Dremal and 3 small drum sanding attachments. I did not have to go completely through the metal, though I did, (slightly) to get it out. Will report back in a few days.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I completed the fork rebuild by following the service manual, the advice here, and a couple of videos including Blacklab's. It takes awhile to understand how they work, but I can now say that both metal slides and guides should be replaced along with the copper washers.
The parts laid out for inspection
DSC00512

The slide metal and guide are coated with teflon and make possible the smooth action of the forks. At 51,000 miles there was visible wear on both. After my earlier struggle I determined that (for me at least) a driving tool was essential so I looked for a pipe that would fit both outside the inner fork tube and inside the outer/lower fork tube. I could not find such a thing so I had to improvise with a 2inch by two foot pvc pipe.

I used a hacksaw to cut the pipe and then just squeezed it together until it fit in the lower fork tube
DSC00515

It took about five whacks to seat the slide metal and the oil seal.

Since the two bolts on the bottoms of the fork are so important I recommend changing the washers and using the locktite sparingly. To strip those would be a crying shame.

I put 18 ounces of 10 wt. fork oil in each tube and it measured like the book said it would.
I rode it today without the fork brace and really liked the change. I will have to run a few curves to get a better idea, but for now I will leave the brace off. Hope this helps and thanks for your responses.
 
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Glad you got everything squared away. Thanks for the update and pics.
 
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