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Around me, there seems to be deals on the non-adv model...not on the adv.

But I will want side cases at some point. Is a set of decent top loaders with racks really going to cost $1300+?

Trying to do the math on how much more I should be willing to pay for the ADV...


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Are you going to ride dirt? For me the answer was yes, so I needed protection. I needed engine guards(crash bars) and the OEM ones with the ADV model are good and beefy...check. I needed hand guards to protect for numerous drops. The OEM plastic ones suck for that...had to buy Bark Busters. I needed a skid plate to protect the headers, collector, oil sump and filter. OEM plastic one might protect the oil filter from a gravel puncture but that's it. Had to purchase a proper skid plate. OEM bags are plastic and small. OK for light pavement touring, but not strong or enough volume for serious trips. Will be purchasing some racks and large soft bags. So for me the crash bars and pavement riding bags was all I got for the extra price of the ADV model.

Oh, and I guess I got a wider windscreen that works for me because I'm short.

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Thanks...only dirt I'll do is forest service roads to campgrounds. People take minivans down those. I guess the stock cases aren't worth the extra dollars. I'd want other ones anyway.


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You can get the Givi Outback Trekkers and racks for about $700 and the Givi crash guards for about $150 from an Italian retailer who's just down the road from Givi. Motostorm.it are great people with great prices. I love the Outback cases.


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Around me, there seems to be deals on the non-adv model...not on the adv.

But I will want side cases at some point. Is a set of decent top loaders with racks really going to cost $1300+?

Trying to do the math on how much more I should be willing to pay for the ADV...


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I live in central CT and as of last week, I knew of 2 new 2014 DL1000a bikes - one adventure. Non-Adventure was 10,465 OTD (tax and reg included). The adventure was $1,300 more.
I don't know where you live. So, I don't know if this helps. But, if you were interested, I would do what I could to help you out.
 

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Unless you find a REALLY killer deal on an ADV model it is my opinion that it is probably better to get the standard model and dress it up to your liking. Your add-ons will likely equal or exceed the ADV model price but they will also probably be more functional for your needs and in some cases sturdier than what the ADV model provides.. The big focus on my statement is the side bags. They are smallish and a bit flimsy. They do mount nicely directly to the rear subframe with no external mounting rack thus they present a much slimmer profile when squeezing through traffic or tight spots but as stated, they are small, one is odd shaped for exhaust can clearance, and very flimsy feeling. If you ride entirely on paved (or well graded) road, the belly protector should do a fine job of deflecting anything from the oil filter/downpipe area. A full skidplate will no question do a much better job though. The taller "touring" screen on the ADV model doesn't make much difference and you will probably end up replacing it. The ADV handguard are very adequate for wind protection but if you are going to venture offroad, a more beefy set with metal reinforcement might be a good idea to help prevent lever damage in even minor drops.
 

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Unless you find a REALLY killer deal on an ADV model it is my opinion that it is probably better to get the standard model and dress it up to your liking. Your add-ons will likely equal or exceed the ADV model price but they will also probably be more functional for your needs and in some cases sturdier than what the ADV model provides.. The big focus on my statement is the side bags. They are smallish and a bit flimsy. They do mount nicely directly to the rear subframe with no external mounting rack thus they present a much slimmer profile when squeezing through traffic or tight spots but as stated, they are small, one is odd shaped for exhaust can clearance, and very flimsy feeling. If you ride entirely on paved (or well graded) road, the belly protector should do a fine job of deflecting anything from the oil filter/downpipe area. A full skidplate will no question do a much better job though. The taller "touring" screen on the ADV model doesn't make much difference and you will probably end up replacing it. The ADV handguard are very adequate for wind protection but if you are going to venture offroad, a more beefy set with metal reinforcement might be a good idea to help prevent lever damage in even minor drops.
Ok, I have an Adventure model, and while I don't completely disagree entirely with the above, I basically disagree. I have 65K miles on my bike and have kept it almost completely stock. I've done multiple longish tours on it (10 days each, 1 to Canada, 2 to Baja, and 1 to Colorado/Moab) and have spent a not inconsiderable amount of time on dirt/rocky/holy shit roads. I've dropped it >15 times (mostly in the dirt).
(1) I am 5'8" tall and the standard windscreen is just fine
(2) The handguards are just fine
(3) The side bags may seem "smallish" but I would say just don't carry a bunch on needless stuff
(4) The crash bars are great
(5) The plastic cowling is not - get a skid proper skid plate

You can probably get an Adventure model for *about* the same price as a DL1000 and you will spend a LOT less outfitting it. Here is a video that summarizes these thoughts, and more. It's 8 minutes long.

https://youtu.be/in7f1WefYoE
 

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Ok, I have an Adventure model, and while I don't completely disagree entirely with the above, I basically disagree. I have 65K miles on my bike and have kept it almost completely stock. I've done multiple longish tours on it (10 days each, 1 to Canada, 2 to Baja, and 1 to Colorado/Moab) and have spent a not inconsiderable amount of time on dirt/rocky/holy shit roads. I've dropped it >15 times (mostly in the dirt).
(1) I am 5'8" tall and the standard windscreen is just fine
(2) The handguards are just fine
(3) The side bags may seem "smallish" but I would say just don't carry a bunch on needless stuff
(4) The crash bars are great
(5) The plastic cowling is not - get a skid proper skid plate

You can probably get an Adventure model for *about* the same price as a DL1000 and you will spend a LOT less outfitting it. Here is a video that summarizes these thoughts, and more. It's 8 minutes long.

https://youtu.be/in7f1WefYoE
Glad to hear you've had such a good experience. btw... Your video does lend some credence to my post..
 

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Glad to hear you've had such a good experience. btw... Your video does lend some credence to my post..


Ha! Yes I know, but I did say that I didn't "completely disagree"!

The broken end of the front brake lever is sort of 'so what' issue IMO. The broken side case... well, I don't know what would happen to other hard side cases in a hard, ripping crash like that. Could be a lot worse.

But I wanted to present a counterpoint. I've saved at least $3k compared to one guy I know and more than that with another. Both outfitted non-adventure bikes.


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I went with the non-adv model, got the great price on a 2014 ($8275 otd ) then spent the money on the Givi's Trekker outbacks and a bunch of other stuff. Glad I went this route.

A side note: I have a 37 ltr right and a 48 ltr left side cases, a guy from Givi told the folks where I bought the bike that the 37/48 would be symmetrical due to exhaust - nope, not true.
I probably would have figured this out when I picked up the bike if it wasn't a fly and ride, a red eye from anchorage.
 

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Pic please

Hey BradA34, I'm thinking of doing just what you have re 48 & 37 ltr side cases. Can you please post some pictures showing how symmetrical they are or not? I can't find any pictures of how this set up looks on the 1000. TIA
 

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The rear of the V2 is symmetrical so you don't need odd size cases.
 

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panniers

Touratech has asymmetrical racks in order to avoid the muffler. Other pannier sit higher or have cut outs to avoid it. The link below shows pannier setups.

Different Pannier Options
http://www.v-strom.co.uk/smf/index.php?topic=31617.msg313568#msg313568



https://apairofstroms.wordpress.com/page/33/?app-download=ios
 

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I have been happy with the adventure last two years
I had crunched the numbers between standard and adventure with suzuki incentives two years ago saved me some serious money and time
like the windshield
the crash bars and oem bags held up well during parking lot nap
the weight the crash bars add is well balanced
for longer trips i just add soft dry bag and have a small hard scooter top case that fits my helmet
works great for a commuter
 

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SW Motech has symmetrical racks for the panniers. See picture. I also have their skidplate ( not on picture) and handguards. Great stuff!



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Hey BradA34, I'm thinking of doing just what you have re 48 & 37 ltr side cases. Can you please post some pictures showing how symmetrical they are or not? I can't find any pictures of how this set up looks on the 1000. TIA
Wow, thread revival. The Givi outback Trekker mount on a 2014 Dl1000 is symmetrical, no need for different capacity panniers on each side.
Wish I would have known that last year.
I like the 37's, the wide 48's are too wide for me, they are hard to balance your weight as you have to take in to consideration the extra width vs weight when using them with a 37 on the opposite side.
If you want the Givi outback Trekker pick one size that will work for you, don't mix sizes.
 

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Touratech has asymmetrical racks in order to avoid the muffler. Other pannier sit higher or have cut outs to avoid it. The link below shows pannier setups.

Different Pannier Options
http://www.v-strom.co.uk/smf/index.php?topic=31617.msg313568#msg313568



https://apairofstroms.wordpress.com/page/33/?app-download=ios
The muffler cut out and the resulting tight to the frame mounting scheme is one of my favorite things about the OEM side cases. They maintain the lines of the bike's design and are as tight as possible and look symmetrical like only only OEM collaboration can achieve. They are on the smallish side but have always done well for me whether commuting or weekend camping for two people. I tend to lash the larger camping cargo (tent, sleeping bags, personal pack, etc.) onto the rear carrier and save the space in the lockable waterproof side cases for the sensitive cargo. I don't even run a tank bag.

With the exception of extra food, water and clothing they work OK for longer tours as well. It depends on where you want to go. If you are interested in heading out into no man's land, you'll need more space. But if you are touring sights and sounds (national parks / monuments) where there are towns and such you can resupply as you go, so you don't need to carry much more than is needed for the weekend trips. As mentioned above, you'll need to be judicious with what you carry (although I still sneak in a few comforts like a chair and folding table).

Another thing to consider is that the OEM side cases open sideways. This can be a hassle if you stuff them with a bunch of loose items. Easily solved by placing loose items into sacks. One huge advantage though, is the ability to open them and access their cargo while the carrier is still fully loaded and overhanging above the side cases.

I am by no means an expert in adventure touring, but I have found that the OEM bags have served me well so far. Their size and shape isn't necessarily the end of the world. However, the touring windshield was too small for me and I have upgraded the bash plate to an Enduro Guardian with highway pegs (highly recommended). I still use the plastic hand guards and love the crash bars. They even have little "roll cages" built in to protect my daytime running lights. The positioning also gives and excellent spacial separation between the DRL's and the other lights to maximize the "three points of light" visual reference for other drivers to see me and judge my motion.

I have only dropped the bike once and that was on the dirt. Although dirty and possibly scuffed a bit there was no damage to the side case, the DRL mounted inboard on the crash bar, the clutch handle, or the plastic hand guards. Everything came through it without injury except my ankle which was sat upon by the side case and twisted a little bit.

For me it was almost even money between the usable adventure equipment + upgrades vs. the naked and outfit from the ground up option. In the end I went with the adventure model for the OEM fit and feel. (the single key is also a nice plus)

Run the numbers for your intended purpose. Many of us don't have the opportunity or inclination to go the hard core adventure route. If you fit into that category, then the OEM stuff might be a good way to go. As mentioned above and by several others, you should probably plan on upgrading the bash plate if for nothing more than peace of mind on the dirt and if you are tall~ish, probably the windscreen too. You could probably also offset some of the cost of upgrades by selling the unwanted parts.

My $0.02, although I'm probably in the minority since I prefer the OEM side cases.
 
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