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Discussion Starter #1
I just took my wife's and then my Wee out for a test spin. I had lowered my wife's bike 3/4" and have raised the forks in my bike 1/2". The difference in handling between the two was amazing. I was thinking about lowering my rear 1/2" and raising my forks to 3/4". Question is, does anyone know an outfit that makes 1/2" loweing links for the Wee? I occasionalyl ride 2 up and at other times have lots of stuff in the bags so that is the reason I am reluctant to lower the rear 3/4". If I can safely lower it I might just go with 3/4" links on the rear. I am only on gravel roads at times so virtually no off road. Thanks
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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If you update your profile, let us know the bike years and sizes involved and give some details about the handling differences, it might help. Do you need the rear lowering or is it just for handling? Do you have ABS and a fork brace?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It's almost worth buying a Strom just so you can have Greywolf instruct you on how to properly maintain and modify it!!

Not that I'm a fan of Greywolf or anything....hahah. Yes I am.
 

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You could pretty easily just get some 3/16 x 1.5 " steel and make your own....
Well, actually no. Mild steel can have yield points down to 25K and then add rust on top, it could be a disaster waiting to happen. What steel to use and what method to cut the steel and how to coat them is very important on a critical suspension component.

I designed a set that is made from 6061T6 aluminum BUT unfortunately, I'm scarred sh!tless to post it because of liability.
 

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Well, all I can say is that we've lowered and raised a bunch of bikes over the years that use flat links, and have never had a single problem. 3/16 steel is plenty stout and if prepped properly, corrosion isn't an issue.
First, you have to get the metal really clean... that means the oil / cosmoline that's present to prevent it from rusting during shipping and storage, (Brakeclean works well).. We prime anything fabbed with self etching primer and finish with either acrylic enamel or basecoat / clearcoat, depending on where it's located. If it worries you that much, there are powdercoating places just about everywhere...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pat-Wife's is 09, mine is an 08. Both are Wees. About equal miles. Same tires. I have fork brace she does not. Neither have ABS. I do not need it lowered for height issues (32" inseam). Her bike handles turns much more quickly and seems to be more neutral and natural than mine. No front end wobble in either bike, same suspension settings other than height, same tire pressure. I do have a gell seat and also the peg lowering kit, I use countersteering and ride more like sport bike than dirt bike (see other posts on riding style). I hope this provides more info.
 

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links

I just put some adjustable links on my vee, now I can fine tune it to my needs. I'll have to fine out the vendor I got them from, seems like they were around $80. If I don't get back in a couple of days send me a reminder.
 

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Well, all I can say is that we've lowered and raised a bunch of bikes over the years that use flat links, and have never had a single problem. 3/16 steel is plenty stout and if prepped properly, corrosion isn't an issue.
First, you have to get the metal really clean... that means the oil / cosmoline that's present to prevent it from rusting during shipping and storage, (Brakeclean works well).. We prime anything fabbed with self etching primer and finish with either acrylic enamel or basecoat / clearcoat, depending on where it's located. If it worries you that much, there are powdercoating places just about everywhere...
It doesn't worry me at all. People can do whatever they want too.

As a design engineer, I wouldn't do it or recommend it. At the very least, one needs to get grade steel (like 4140) rather then chocolate mild steel. The cost difference is negligible and failure is not an option.

Take your links off and with a pair of calipers, check for hole elongation.
 
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