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Discussion Starter #61
Hahaha! Sorry, I don't have time; I'm either riding, breaking, or fixing my bike!!

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Discussion Starter #62
Most sag suggestions are between 30-35mm. That seems to be for "street bikes". Are those numbers different for ADV bikes that go offroad, bend rims, and bend forks?
 

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Most sag suggestions are between 30-35mm. That seems to be for "street bikes". Are those numbers different for ADV bikes that go offroad, bend rims, and bend forks?
40mm of total sag is good for the Stroms
 
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The cost of replacement fork tubes or even a triple clamp is not the issue. If all those are bent the frame is probably out of whack too, which is basically the end for that bike. At least, I would abandon ship at that point.

New lower triple clamp is about $575 on partzilla fwiw. Including the actual steering stem.

Sounds like it's just the forks that are slightly bent though, so maybe Our Hero can get away with replacing only the long relatively skinny part of both forks (circa $630 for the two). Or not even that, if the fork brace can be lived without.

Might be possible to get a straight set of used fork tubes too. Dunno if anyone makes a less expensive, aftermarket fork set for the Vee.
 

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Your rim has been subject to higher than normal abuse because the forks have been locked by the fork brace preventing the forks doing their job. If the forks are now working as they should I would not be in a rush to start buying new fork tubes etc.
Sure check them out. I remember the instructions for my fork brace being very adamant that it needed to be fitted very carefully to avoid locking or interfering with the action of the forks. Maybe you just got lucky and the wheel took all of the abuse. I have my fingers crossed for you.
 

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The cost of replacement fork tubes or even a triple clamp is not the issue. If all those are bent the frame is probably out of whack too, which is basically the end for that bike. At least, I would abandon ship at that point....
Frames are lot stronger. I’ve bent plenty of tubes and a couple of triples without any frame damage.
 

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Frames are lot stronger. I’ve bent plenty of tubes and a couple of triples without any frame damage.
Good to know, and from the sound of it I don't think OP's frame is necessarily bent.

When I had the steering stem off for bearing replacement last summer, I remember thinking "wow, this is an impressively massive casting." Felt like it weighed the better part of 10 lb, just the lower part of the clamp & attached stem (I believe the stem shaft is steel).

I would hate to be involved in any incident that could actually result in it getting bent!
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Just to be sure, I installed my fork brace this morning; the forks are definitely binding up with it on. I removed it, and the forks went back to working as expected.

To test out just how good they are actually working, I headed up to the road that bent my rim, and rode that rock garden road for about 4 miles. I had absolutely no issues at all. I was going to stop and inspect my bike once I got back onto the pavement, but it was so obvious that the forks were doing their job that I just kept going. Another 70 miles on paved, twisty back country roads, then 10 or so on the slab to get home!

I gotta say; the 1.0 Sonic Springs and the 12.5w oil are marvelous together! I have a nice firm (but not harsh) ride, great in the corners, great on dirt roads...even super rocky dirt roads.

I can for sure tell that the fork brace isn't installed; it just feels different, nowhere near as planted or solid (as it felt when it was working properly). But after 30 minutes or so I was able to adapt and start turning up the wick.

So, for now I'll run without the brace, and eventually get around to changing out the left fork seal that's leaking, and do the "twirl in the triple tree" test per @RichDesmond and see if I need to replace a tube. Then I'll re-install the brace.

The moral of this story is the same as my last story (broken chain, broken bike): if something doesn't seem right with your bike, find it and fix it! Before you need to buy a rim...or worse...

The end! Get out there and ride!! 😁
 

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I think my front rim is made out of tin foil. :-(

I bent it in 3 spots back on April 24; driving down a semi-rocky forest service road. I found a retired machinist who bent it back into shape.

Then last week I was on a back road that turned out to be insanely rocky. I slowly picked my way thru, thinking "this has to end soon" and that just around the bend it'll smooth out. Nope. And somehow, 6 miles in, I noticed my front end was squishy. Stopped to look, and sure enough I had a huge dent in the rim; big enough that it couldn't hold air. View attachment 274487

I grabbed a large rock and beat on the rim a bit, but couldn't bend the rim back at all. So I turned around and rode 6 miles back on a flat front tire over this insanely rocky road.

Then I turned in my man card and called my wife. :) She brought me my 5lb sledge hammer and the handle from my old floor jack, and I pounded the crap out of the rim until it held air, then rode 20 minutes home with no issues. Looks like crap now, but at least it held air!

View attachment 274492

And it's still holding air; loses maybe 1 psi per evening.

This is a cast aluminum rim, correct? ('04 DL1000) A guy at work that's studying metallurgy told me that beating on the rim has either made that spot brittle, or super hard. Or both. He's not exactly sure. :) Anybody here know? Also, could the previous work that was done fixing the other bends (heat was used) have weakened the entire rim?

I don't know why my rim is bending so easily. Maybe my new springs are too stiff? I can't set the sag on my forks because when I sit on the bike, the forks don't compress at all. (If I bounce the bike, the forks compress; they also compress when I use the front brakes.)

Anyway, I'm not exactly sure what to do now; I'll be looking for a new front rim, but am I just going to bend that one too? I don't see many (any) "bent front rim" posts here.
Your tire appears to be a very low profile?
 

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Discussion Starter #71
It became low profile when all the air left it. :) Normally, it's looks just like a Shinko 705.
 

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How is the fork brace making the forks bind? The braces I have installed (DR650 & DL650) ties the forks together so they do not flex outward like a bow legged cowboy and work more in unison. They have never impacted the travel of the forks.
 

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I'm guessing that the long inner tubes (not sure of proper term) are slightly bent. They are held rigidly by the triple clamp.

The bottom (outer) halves of the tubes, without the fork brace, have a little flexibility to move over the bent inner tubes. While the bottom ends are fixed together by the axle, the top ends are held by the plastic fender, as well as having to fit over the inner tubes. It is a very long way between the two rigid support points (triple clamp & axle).

This somewhat-wobbly arrangement is why someone invented the fork brace.

With the fork brace present, the lower (outer) tubes are held rigidly in relation to one another, being strongly clamped at both ends. When they try to move over the bent inner tubes, binding happens.

Something like that, anyway.
 

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Riding around Alaska and the Yukon on a '92 Suzuki GSX1100G fully loaded a few years back, I was headed into Dawson on a paved road that was mostly nice, but punctuated occasionally by big scary potholes. I managed to avoid them until one caught me by surprise. I hit hard enough that my mouth snapped shut and hurt my jaw, hurt my arms, and both rear view mirrors were bent down at the pivots at the end of the arms. I fully expected to wind up with blown fork seals and/or bent rim, but mercifully it was all fine. Head scratcher. Shrug
 

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It is hardened and brittle. It won't bend quite as easy next time but it won't simply bend, it will crack badly. You could hammer that on out and sand it, paint it and use it only on the street if you are not too risk averse.

If you continue with your 500 lb dirt bike with a new rim You might want to look into lighter fork oil. let the fork move more right up to bottoming out, then go back to slightly thicker oil until it travels and absorbs bumps but doesn't quite bottom out. back in mx days the thought was that the bike should bottom out once lightly on the worst hit. then you add a little more f oil to prevent that. you want the suspension to move just shy of, or barely bottoming out.
good luck
You could try filling the lower 1/2 of the fork tube with 10 weight oil and the top 1/2 with 5 weight oil to make a progressive type shock, or just go back and get your KLR 650 like I do when the going gets that bad
 

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274901

Not what RLB meant, I think.
 

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I think my front rim is made out of tin foil. :-(

I bent it in 3 spots back on April 24; driving down a semi-rocky forest service road. I found a retired machinist who bent it back into shape.

Then last week I was on a back road that turned out to be insanely rocky. I slowly picked my way thru, thinking "this has to end soon" and that just around the bend it'll smooth out. Nope. And somehow, 6 miles in, I noticed my front end was squishy. Stopped to look, and sure enough I had a huge dent in the rim; big enough that it couldn't hold air. View attachment 274487

I grabbed a large rock and beat on the rim a bit, but couldn't bend the rim back at all. So I turned around and rode 6 miles back on a flat front tire over this insanely rocky road.

Then I turned in my man card and called my wife. :) She brought me my 5lb sledge hammer and the handle from my old floor jack, and I pounded the crap out of the rim until it held air, then rode 20 minutes home with no issues. Looks like crap now, but at least it held air!

View attachment 274492

And it's still holding air; loses maybe 1 psi per evening.

This is a cast aluminum rim, correct? ('04 DL1000) A guy at work that's studying metallurgy told me that beating on the rim has either made that spot brittle, or super hard. Or both. He's not exactly sure. :) Anybody here know? Also, could the previous work that was done fixing the other bends (heat was used) have weakened the entire rim?

I don't know why my rim is bending so easily. Maybe my new springs are too stiff? I can't set the sag on my forks because when I sit on the bike, the forks don't compress at all. (If I bounce the bike, the forks compress; they also compress when I use the front brakes.)

Anyway, I'm not exactly sure what to do now; I'll be looking for a new front rim, but am I just going to bend that one too? I don't see many (any) "bent front rim" posts here.
Bro! Good for you on barging that beast down what ever rocky trail you dam well please. Your wife need to put a gold star on your .an card and hand it back.
 

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You could try filling the lower 1/2 of the fork tube with 10 weight oil and the top 1/2 with 5 weight oil to make a progressive type shock, or just go back and get your KLR 650 like I do when the going gets that bad
For some reason I found this hilarious! It reminds me of the joke about the guy who bought a Thermos, and, because it was supposed to keep hot things hot and cold things cold, he filled it with chili and iced tea. lol
 
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