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Yeah, that rim is toast. Good thing you have a source for a replacement. I've shopped used Vee rims on eBay, and the prices can be high.

It's probably a good thing I had the overly-soft, stock forks the first few years I owned the bike. Went on lots of rocky-ish trails, no damage to bike. Maybe your trail was rockier, but we have a backside-of-the-mountain route here that is crazy rocky in some sections. I go reallly slow on those parts.

Haven't been on that road since I got the forks and rear shock upgraded & rebuilt. I'll consider this thread a reminder to take things extra-easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Actually, @DesertBike, please go ride that road and let me know if the updated suspenders make a difference! It's for science, man...science!! 馃榿馃榿 (And it will help me determine if I should also get the Sasquatch rebuild. But that's science too, right??)
 
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Oh, I can answer that one. You should definitely get a Sasquatch rebuild.

It was a pain in the ass from the point of view that I had to send him 2 used shocks to get 1 that was a good rebuild candidate. That took a couple months.

It was still faster and cheaper than any of the all-new shock options. Aside from Progressive, no one even sells a replacement shock for first-gen Vees with all the same features as the original (for example, remote-adjustable preload).
 

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K9, there is a huge difference between a 500 pound+ DL650 with 33 psi in the tires bouncing over rough terrain trying to maintain control at speed and a Gas-Gas trials bike with 4-5 psi hopping obstacles at no miles an hour.
Not to mention that the dirt bike rider can shift his weight/apply throttle to lighten the front. None of that going on with a Strom of course.

Also if you don't have an understanding of "look where you want to go" you're going to bust up a 500lb bike even on dirt roads that have the occasional "bad" spot.
 
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Trials bike riders are running 4-5psi rear and 7-10psi fronts (of course, they're using rim-locks to prevent tire or tube failure) and dual-sport riders are running 15-18psi For slowly picking your line through and over larger rocks, lower tire pressure can increase adhesion. For sure, these 500lb machines are road bikes with good manners off the beaten path and there are better choices for bouncing off rocks, but once you have big knobbies instead of road tires, lower air pressures have been used by many riders successfully. Tubeless spoked-rims are relatively new to the world and offer a good compromise, but true spoked-rims are generally tubed and allow for more reliable air-down work. YMMV
And I've been on dual sport rides (on my DR-Z400) where a bunch of guys running those low pressures got bent rims and pinch flats. Those of us running 25 psi or so had no issues.
 

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Rocks - use higher pressure
Sand - use lower pressure

There is just enough metallurgy information in this thread to be dangerous. Work hardening occurs when a material is deformed past the elastic point (point in which it springs back to it's original shape or profile). With metals, this makes the part susceptible to a fatigue failure at a now lower, load cycle count. Essentially work hardening is creating a rim which will be about as strong as it was at the beginning, but possess much lower fatigue resistance. If you look up elastic strain versus plastic strain, for different metals, it will make some sense. The secret is in the part of the stress-strain curve where permanent deformation occurs (plastic range) and what the curve looks like in the plastic range. The short story is aluminum is strong, but has mediocre fatigue resistance and can have a shorter lifespan than steel (which has high strength and good fatigue resistance).

If you persist in your riding style, I would put a much more durable wheel on the front (and maybe the rear to). A spoked wheel, that has an extruded rim (like the XTs use) is much more durable than the cast wheels you have. There is a reason the Super Tenere and the GS Adventure bikes use these types of wheels, besides they just look bitchin.

FWIW - I would expect the next bendy to occur just like the first one. Bang, oh crap, flat tire. If you hit something offroad, you will be going slow. If you hit something on road like a pothole, you should have just steered around it, there is plenty of road debris that can kill you (on any bike) and potholes are just one of them.
 

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To add to the above just a little. Aluminum and steel vary in their strength and fatigue resistance, depending on alloying and how the part is created.

Extruded rims are not much stronger than cast, but they have much higher fatigue resistance. An extruded rim can be bent, beat back, and bent again until stress cracks start to appear. A cast rim is going to suffer much faster and you may never see the stress cracks with your eyes.
 

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I think my front rim is made out of tin foil. :-(

I bent it in 3 spots back on April 24; driving down a semi-rocky forest service road. I found a retired machinist who bent it back into shape.

Then last week I was on a back road that turned out to be insanely rocky. I slowly picked my way thru, thinking "this has to end soon" and that just around the bend it'll smooth out. Nope. And somehow, 6 miles in, I noticed my front end was squishy. Stopped to look, and sure enough I had a huge dent in the rim; big enough that it couldn't hold air. View attachment 274487

I grabbed a large rock and beat on the rim a bit, but couldn't bend the rim back at all. So I turned around and rode 6 miles back on a flat front tire over this insanely rocky road.

Then I turned in my man card and called my wife. :) She brought me my 5lb sledge hammer and the handle from my old floor jack, and I pounded the crap out of the rim until it held air, then rode 20 minutes home with no issues. Looks like crap now, but at least it held air!

View attachment 274492

And it's still holding air; loses maybe 1 psi per evening.

This is a cast aluminum rim, correct? ('04 DL1000) A guy at work that's studying metallurgy told me that beating on the rim has either made that spot brittle, or super hard. Or both. He's not exactly sure. :) Anybody here know? Also, could the previous work that was done fixing the other bends (heat was used) have weakened the entire rim?

I don't know why my rim is bending so easily. Maybe my new springs are too stiff? I can't set the sag on my forks because when I sit on the bike, the forks don't compress at all. (If I bounce the bike, the forks compress; they also compress when I use the front brakes.)

Anyway, I'm not exactly sure what to do now; I'll be looking for a new front rim, but am I just going to bend that one too? I don't see many (any) "bent front rim" posts here.
That looks just like my front wheel after my jeep trail experience. Got an idea of what spoked wheels will fit a gen 1 Wee?
 

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A cast rim is going to suffer much faster and you may never see the stress cracks with your eyes.
Just out of curiosity, to what extent can these cracks extend all the way from the inside to the outside? As we are using tubeless tires, could this be a source of leaks as well?
 

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Discussion Starter #30
That looks just like my front wheel after my jeep trail experience. Got an idea of what spoked wheels will fit a gen 1 Wee?
I don't; I'm dealing with a gen 1 Vee and could spend $700 on a custom setup...just for the front!
 
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Even used Vee wheels are stupid expensive. Fronts particularly. I guess because they're damaged in collisions and accidents like this one more often than rear wheels.
 

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If you hit something on road like a pothole, you should have just steered around it,
You must work for an insurance company.
How would you have steered around this one?
 
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If you hit something on road like a pothole, you should have just steered around it, ...
What a ridiculous comment. Say that out loud to yourself, slowly. I think you'll change your tune.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
She let's me have it back after a couple of months of pouting and crying...
 

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I ride the same rocky stuff and run normal tire pressure. I would only air down in sand or maybe snow. I do miss a LOT of bad things like rocks and washout ravines that would hurt any bike. You can often unload the front wheel quite a bit to lessen a hit you can鈥檛 miss. I鈥檝e felt rocks in my hands but so far only the PO dent in the front rim. Fingers crossed.

Can you pop your old springs back in and give it a whirl? Or swap a triple clamp off a KTM adv bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Yeah; I'm going to do some experimenting this weekend with old springs, different weights and amounts of oil, and spacer sizes.
 
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Yeah; I'm going to do some experimenting this weekend with old springs, different weights and amounts of oil, and spacer sizes.
Why......Rich said that isn't what caused your rim to muck up and I agree 110%? If you are doing such for a better ride quality or set up for YOU, than I do agree with that, otherwise you would be getting a false sense of security for better protection.
 

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You must work for an insurance company.
How would you have steered around this one?
I have had insurance companies as clients, but I get paid to engineer chit.


What a ridiculous comment. Say that out loud to yourself, slowly. I think you'll change your tune.
I type pretty darn slow, does that count? And then I proofread it with my mouth moving too, does that help?

To both the rebuttals - The "ride around it" was tongue in cheek in a way, but besides "ride around it", you can also use the lever thingy on the right handlebar and slow down, when you see a patch work quilt of Alaska roadway. That way impacts are minimized. I have followed many riders that run right over stuff in the road. Not moving stuff like animals, but static stuff like down tree limbs, tire treads, lumber etc. and in broad daylight. Following them I seem to be able to see"most" of these things, before they hit them.

I will try to use itallics in the future for humorous content.
 
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