How does GPS improve your travelling experience? - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Techy World! GPS, Electronics, etc Electronics forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 04:23 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
bobosmite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Gainesville, VA
Posts: 981
How does GPS improve your travelling experience?

I'm on the edge of either buying a GPS or sticking with paper maps. How does adding a GPS improve your overall travelling experience?

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
2014 Suzuki DL1000
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
SEARCH is your FRIEND
bobosmite is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 04:32 PM
$tromtrooper
 
tmcgee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Braintree, Massachusetts
Posts: 8,025
Maps don't tell you where you are, but they are far better for seeing the big picture. The GPS frees me up from paying attention to the planned route. It's also invaluable for finding nearby attractions, services, whatever you might be looking for.

-Tom (DL650AL2) (KA1TOX) (E-I-E-I-O)

This message and images are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. http://creativecommons.org
tmcgee is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 04:53 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Ogre_FL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Cook Bayou, FL
Posts: 539
The paper maps I would have to take to equal the details on my GPS would fill my luggage

In seconds I can tell (with a bit of scrolling/zooming) what a given road connects to or where it goes. I am also positive that it is the road that I think it is, as my little arrow tells me that I am on it. And this is ANYWHERE in the US I may be, any side road is up for exploration or inclusion into my route.

With a GPS I now explore far more areas and travel on more minor roads than I ever did during my paper map days.

That said don't get rid of the paper, I always have an overview map in my tank bag too. As tmcgee said, they show the big picture better than the GPS and are a must for back up.

Also, when a forest road gets particularly tough, really knowing how much of it I have left has kept me from turning back (or convinced me I need too) , this is priceless info.
Ogre_FL is offline  
 
post #4 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 05:02 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
msi1259's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Cambridge, Ontario
Posts: 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobosmite View Post
I'm on the edge of either buying a GPS or sticking with paper maps. How does adding a GPS improve your overall travelling experience?
I find it is almost like taking a picture - tracks can be displayed in Google Earth, zoomed in, and you can later see why the road wound around like it did (or why Peninsula Road got it's name - even though you didn't see the water because of the trees while riding it). The feeling of going up and down can be seen in the elevation profiles of the GPS track. The trip can be re-lived by the flyovers in Google Earth - it allows you to follow the track with an airplane like view. I also find I don't worry about going off the planned route, or I can easily see if I'm turning the wrong way at a Tee intersection. Sort of like dropping bread crumbs, it makes it difficult to get lost - just back track following the lines. I use an inexpensive Garmin Etrex Legend (paid <$135 CDN) on a RAM mount, and am (literally) lost without it!

DL1000K5

Last edited by msi1259; 03-22-2008 at 12:26 PM.
msi1259 is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 06:54 PM
$tromtrooper
 
SCraig's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 3,722
To me a GPS is indispensible, however I do carry paper maps as well. A GPS is great for seeing detail all around you. They are also great to show you the best way to get from Point A to Point B and back again (a couple of button clicks and a route to get me home from anywhere in North America is displayed). The are great for record keeping. I record "Tracks" that will capture a point about every 10 seconds or so. When I get home I can review every point along the route. If I want to go back to a particular point in the future I've got a record of it. Also, as shown in the post above, I can get a profile of my trip that shows all of the altitude changes.

I have two. One is battery powered (Garmin ETrex Legend-C) and is a backup. The other (Garmin Street Pilot 2820) is not and is the one I use most of the time. It also has a built-in MP3 player and I've found that music makes a big difference on longer trips. It also has voice cues and will tell me to "in 3 tenths of a mile turn left on Davidson Drive, then turn right" so when it's navigating I don't have to look at it, only listen. It does speak the road names as well and doesn't just say "Turn Left" or "Turn Right". That is a big plus in crowded city areas because sometimes it's hard to tell exactly what road to turn on.

But .... a GPS won't change the way you ride, it won't do everything for you, nor will it put gas in your tank. They are great to have around, but for route planning I still prefer either software on my computer or a plain old paper map. They are great tools, and I won't go far without one, but they are just another tool. How much you get out of them depends on how well you learn to use them and then put them to use.

Scott Craig - Nashville, TN
Red '06 Suzuki DL650 - Red '07 Honda VFR800 - My Bike Page
SCraig is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 07:25 PM
$tromtrooper
 
zed88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Chicago Suburbs IL
Posts: 1,135
Send a message via AIM to zed88
Everything here +1, and when traveling the backroads its really nice to know what connects where, and when you may be coming up on roads. Its very difficult to miss a turn, when your getting advance warnings about it for a mile. Its also nice to instantly know where gas/food is. Just ask for the nearest gas station and away you go.

dl650k5 -fully farkled- 65k miles. Sold but not forgotten
2006 fjr -roadrunner
zed88 is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 07:49 PM
$tromtrooper
 
SCraig's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 3,722
Quote:
Its also nice to instantly know where gas/food is. Just ask for the nearest gas station and away you go.
Good point, Zed. I completely forgot to mention that feature and I use it a LOT

Scott Craig - Nashville, TN
Red '06 Suzuki DL650 - Red '07 Honda VFR800 - My Bike Page
SCraig is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 05-29-2007, 08:06 PM
$tromtrooper
 
tmcgee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Braintree, Massachusetts
Posts: 8,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by zed88 View Post
Its also nice to instantly know where gas/food is. Just ask for the nearest gas station and away you go.
There are lots of points of interest (POI) files out there now and it's a great way to customize the places you might need to know about (Suzuki motorcycle dealers, fer instance). Or high output coffee vendors. These files can be uploaded to your Garmin (dunno about other brands, but prolly them too).

In my case, I repair church organs for a living and I've got a POI file with all my customers in it.

Most of us do very well getting from point A (home) to point B (wherever you usually want to go, but we don't usually know the best way to get from point C to point D. GPS fixes that problem especially well if you're on the road a lot.

-Tom (DL650AL2) (KA1TOX) (E-I-E-I-O)

This message and images are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. http://creativecommons.org
tmcgee is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 05-30-2007, 12:09 AM
Stromtrooper for Life Godspeed Tim!
 
twowheelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 176
Cost of paper map: $5.95
Cost of GPS: $599.99
Cost of shutting up the wife when she thinks you're lost - again: Priceless.

:mrgreen:

DL650AK7 (Alaska bound), '05 FJR1300 (Asphalt connoisseur - Back in bidness! )
twowheelnut is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 05-30-2007, 09:28 AM
Stromthusiast!
 
GeoBiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 233
On the Friday of the Strom gathering, a couple of us had ridden the dragon and wanted to head over the Tellico Plains and take the Cherahola back to Robbinsville. I set the GPS on 'short route' and followed the directions. It led us on a network of beautiful winding back roads that I would have never been able to find, much less follow, on any map..

[B]Blue, K5-DL650[/B]
GeoBiker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome