Hello everyone I am new rider - Page 2 - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Stromtroopers - New member introductions Introduce yourself! Post a note about yourself, why you are riding a V-Strom, what your thoughts are about the bike, photos (via link) personal website, etc.

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post #11 of 20 Old 04-21-2019, 08:29 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Northeast FL
Posts: 80
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Welcome aboard and enjoy the new bike

2011 DL650A, 2008 C50T
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post #12 of 20 Old 04-21-2019, 09:31 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 3
Hey, as a new rider I appreciate your input and advice on what to do with the new (to me) bike. Good advice. Love the perspective of safety and sensible riding. Thanks! This kind of rider is why I bought a bike like this.
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post #13 of 20 Old 04-21-2019, 10:48 PM
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I just started riding in 2017, so there's lots I've learned over 20,000km or so that I'd like to share with a new rider. Fortunately, sfalexi already said all of it. Read his post a couple more times.
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post #14 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 02:37 AM
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Join Date: May 2013
Location: South Africa
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Welcome to the Forum, Shawn. Some useful tips on riding, can be found in section https://www.stromtrooper.com/riding-proficiency/. Start out by reading https://www.stromtrooper.com/riding-...ce-riding.html. Build up your confidence first, through a lot of practice in empty parking lots. Ride safe.
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post #15 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 06:49 AM
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Welcome to the forum, Shawn.
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post #16 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 06:55 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Rockville, MD, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Greenwood View Post
Any advice to a newbie, greenhorn to motorcycling?
Hello, welcome, and congratulations both on taking the plunge to start riding and on a fresh new ride for the experience.

At just short of five years' experience my own self the best advice I can give is: ride your own ride. I don't know how you view risks and risk management, so I'm not going to say either "learn to ride aggressively" nor "take it gently", because you are going to do what you will do. But I'd encourage you to form some habits:
  • Learn to ALWAYS be aware of what is happening around you, and particularly what is happening behind you. An aggressive or inattentive driver will follow you too closely. Distracted drives can wipe you out while you are standing still at a traffic control. Keep a wary eye on those mirroros.
  • Check out what the motorists beside you are doing. Are they paying attention to where they are going, or are they on their phone?
  • Make eye contact with drives where possible. Then you can be SURE they've seen you and recognized that you are on a bike,
  • ATTGATT.
  • Before EVERY ride, take a lap around the bike. CHeck the tire pressures each and every time, and adjust accordingly. Are the headlights on? Taillights? Any suspicious odors (oil smoke, coolant, overall "hot" smell?
  • Get to know your bike and your personal level of comfort before you venture out onto a freeway. Troll around your neighborhood. Get a feel for the clutch and the brakes and the throttle.
  • Be aware of when you are in low-grip situations. Braking and cornering are best done separately, at least to start.
  • Take your shiny new ride to a spacious empty parking lot and work on low-speed maneuvers. (Take the bags off if you have them, and if they come off- no sense bashing them up if you drop the bike.)
  • Top boxes are way convenient, BUT they affect the handling of the bike. Not dramatically, but enough so that you should be cognizant of what you toss in there.
  • Keep loads down low and between the axles where at all possible.
  • Keeping the visor down on your helmet reduces the wind noise, and also number of bugs you have to pick out of your teeth.
  • Ear plugs. Get some, and use 'em. Every ride.
  • Get to know your bike. Doing the service is a great way to get started on that and also gives you confidence that you KNOW what's been done.
  • I do probably 98 percent of my miles on solo rides; the only group rides I've done have been parts of weekend-long event get-togethers.
  • Go to some events- they are great way to meet like-minded (*) bretheren. (*- not necessarily like minded with regard to politics, religion, guns, tires, or oil... but brethren all the same.)
  • Be aware of changing weather conditions. Getting caught in the rain makes your bike a mess, makes you wet and probably cold (and therefore reduces your ability to be aware of and respond to potential threats), reduces grip, turns road paint into a surface approximately as slippery as an auto dealer faced with a defective product for which he doesn't want to assume liability), washes sticks, leaves, and gravel into the road... in short, nothing good comes of it.

There's more, but this will do to get started.
sfalexi and Webfors like this.

-= Keith Adams =-
Rockville, MD USA
2004 Honda ST1300
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 09:36 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2016
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Welcome! Spend time on Veronica in a parking lot, maneuvering around parking paint, low speed turning, braking, stopping, etc. Get very comfortable on her before riding her hard.

Two wheels for realz!
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post #18 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 12:47 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Billings, MT
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There's been a lot of good advice so far; but, I'll provide a couple not usually given in addition to what has already been provided. Don't fixate your focus 5 feet in front of the bike. It just makes you tense and miss things for which you should be looking. I look at riding a motorcycle as being in a position where everybody is trying to kill you; so, observe accordingly. Looking down the road will actually make you more relaxed. Next, don't grip the grips with a death grip. It will wear you out and make you less responsive rather than more responsive. About 30-40 years ago an old pro told me to grip the grips as though you were to grip a baby bird you wished no harm.

Last edited by BigSky; 04-22-2019 at 12:47 PM. Reason: I corrected a spelling error.
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post #19 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 02:44 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Cobble Hill, Vancouver Island, BC
Posts: 116
You go where you look.

This is especially true on a motorcycle.

Don't look into the corner, look around it. Don't look at the car that suddenly came around the corner you are in. Keep it in your peripheral vision, but "look" your way around the corner.

Here's a simple test as proof. Let's say you are riding down a highway with 2 lanes on your side and you want to change lanes. Now, in my early days riding, I always wanted to avoid the reflectors when changing lanes, but I almost always hit them simply because they are there to focus on and I did just that so it seemed every time I changed lanes I was driving over the damned things.

I went where I was looking.

Look between the reflectors and you smoothly bisect them and you are in your new lane. This isn't rocket science or a big revelation, but it's a simple, safe way to make the point when you are riding. On quiet roads I often "serpentine" my way along looking for targets to put my front wheel over and to see how quickly I can react. Easy, simple way to practice what you need to do.
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post #20 of 20 Old 04-22-2019, 02:50 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Vancouver, BC (ish)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ibike2havefun View Post
Hello, welcome, and congratulations both on taking the plunge to start riding and on a fresh new ride for the experience.

At just short of five years' experience my own self the best advice I can give is: ride your own ride. I don't know how you view risks and risk management, so I'm not going to say either "learn to ride aggressively" nor "take it gently", because you are going to do what you will do. But I'd encourage you to form some habits:
  • Learn to ALWAYS be aware of what is happening around you, and particularly what is happening behind you. An aggressive or inattentive driver will follow you too closely. Distracted drives can wipe you out while you are standing still at a traffic control. Keep a wary eye on those mirroros.
  • Check out what the motorists beside you are doing. Are they paying attention to where they are going, or are they on their phone?
  • Make eye contact with drives where possible. Then you can be SURE they've seen you and recognized that you are on a bike,
  • ATTGATT.
  • Before EVERY ride, take a lap around the bike. CHeck the tire pressures each and every time, and adjust accordingly. Are the headlights on? Taillights? Any suspicious odors (oil smoke, coolant, overall "hot" smell?
  • Get to know your bike and your personal level of comfort before you venture out onto a freeway. Troll around your neighborhood. Get a feel for the clutch and the brakes and the throttle.
  • Be aware of when you are in low-grip situations. Braking and cornering are best done separately, at least to start.
  • Take your shiny new ride to a spacious empty parking lot and work on low-speed maneuvers. (Take the bags off if you have them, and if they come off- no sense bashing them up if you drop the bike.)
  • Top boxes are way convenient, BUT they affect the handling of the bike. Not dramatically, but enough so that you should be cognizant of what you toss in there.
  • Keep loads down low and between the axles where at all possible.
  • Keeping the visor down on your helmet reduces the wind noise, and also number of bugs you have to pick out of your teeth.
  • Ear plugs. Get some, and use 'em. Every ride.
  • Get to know your bike. Doing the service is a great way to get started on that and also gives you confidence that you KNOW what's been done.
  • I do probably 98 percent of my miles on solo rides; the only group rides I've done have been parts of weekend-long event get-togethers.
  • Go to some events- they are great way to meet like-minded (*) bretheren. (*- not necessarily like minded with regard to politics, religion, guns, tires, or oil... but brethren all the same.)
  • Be aware of changing weather conditions. Getting caught in the rain makes your bike a mess, makes you wet and probably cold (and therefore reduces your ability to be aware of and respond to potential threats), reduces grip, turns road paint into a surface approximately as slippery as an auto dealer faced with a defective product for which he doesn't want to assume liability), washes sticks, leaves, and gravel into the road... in short, nothing good comes of it.

There's more, but this will do to get started.
+1 +2....

All of this is great! Ride like you're invisible. Just assume nobody ever sees you.
Read as much as you can on this forum, and find some riding buddies that won't push you beyond your abilities.

Long time rider, new to Stromming.
2018 DL1000 ... in yellow. <sigh>
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