My ultimate concern is chopping the throttle or - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Riding Proficiency Tips and suggestions for improving the rider's safety skills and riding techniques

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post #1 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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My ultimate concern is chopping the throttle or

braking in a corner. I have been trying to purposefully learn how to take corners faster in an effort to not be afraid of leaning the bike as low as possible. However, in a panic situation, I don't really know that I won't panic and do the wrong thing.
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post #2 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 09:46 PM
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Muscle memory, Keep practicing. Same corners with minor variations in the throttle and lean angle. Having tires you trust makes a difference too.
I hit some sweepers on a trip last summer at a good velocity and was dragging the pegs unexpectedly. Then again I was riding with a sacked out shock that we changed a couple days later.
Practice. practice, practice.
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post #3 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 10:33 PM
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Get good tires, for example tourances or k76, which stick well to the road. Light leans to more aggressive leans. At times I surprise myself when my boot drags on a corner lean. Over correction could be the problem.

In any case take it easy.

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post #4 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 10:34 PM
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Decide that you won't give up on a corner. It's far better to low slide than high side. Really it's mostly mental (up to a point of course). Just make the commitment to keep turning in, giving up is not an option!

Saying that don't get yourself into a corner so hot that you panic. Have your read "The Pace"? It outlines a style of street riding that allows you to have fun but ride in a sane fashion.

Another thing always use a late apex approach to cornering on the street. That will give you maximum visabilty through the turn and keeps you away from oncoming traffic.

Finally have your heard the saying " slow in, fast out" ? Lot of truth to that. If you muff the entry you won't make a smooth turn or a quick exit. Better to be conservative on the entrance especially on the street where blowing a corner can be hazardous to your health.
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post #5 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 10:57 PM
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Look where you want to go.......not where you're going. And Spec gave some great advice and resources, and when you brake into a corner.......it unloads the suspension and messes up the overall geometry.
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post #6 of 17 Old 10-09-2016, 11:21 PM
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Post learning to lean

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Originally Posted by cavenger View Post
braking in a corner. I have been trying to purposefully learn how to take corners faster in an effort to not be afraid of leaning the bike as low as possible. However, in a panic situation, I don't really know that I won't panic and do the wrong thing.
The V-Stroms don't lean even 40 degrees off vertical before the pegs touch. At that lean angle, the sideways acceleration is about 0.84 g's, and on dry pavement with decent (not old and hard) tires, there is about 1.1 g's of side traction available. [a] This means that when you touch the pegs, you've got about 30 percent traction margin absent gravel, leaves, oil, etc. On wet, non-oily pavement, available side traction falls to about 0.7 g's [a], so touching the pegs is clearly counter-indicated then.

[a. My traction figures are taken from a publication, "The Pneumatic Tire", published by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. I have translated coefficients of friction to g's because it's valid and easier to comprehend. See figures 11.39 (wet) and 11.43A (dry).]

Why should anybody care about this sort of physics? I cared because it made clear that the bike is well short of sliding when the pegs are not scraping hard.

I gainsay nothing others have said about confidence. Ultimately, with experience, you'll understand traction margin at a gut level. The physics is just maybe a shortcut.

One thing I found very worthwhile in "The Pneumatic Tire" was seeing how gradually traction falls off on the backside of the traction versus slip curves (references in above footnote.) It is gradual enough to readily explain why we can feel some sliding on tight turns without the bike just suddenly slipping out from underneath us. What this means in practice is that it is not reckless, on good, known and dry pavement, to gently approach the sliding threshold and discover how the bike behaves there. (This should, of course, only be done someplace, such as a track, where a lowside crash would mean just a scraped bike and gear rather than serious injury.)
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post #7 of 17 Old 10-10-2016, 12:35 AM
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Definitely check out this link Survival Reactions & Body Position, I found it helpful when I restarted riding a few years ago. The basic idea is to keep your head aligned with the bike as it leans so the fluid in your inner ear (sense of balance) doesn't get pushed to the left or to the right by centrifugal forces, etc. If you don't tilt your head with the bike your mind will automatically interpret it as an impending fall and cause you to panic and grab the brake or chop the throttle. Try it as an exercise in an exaggerated way and you'll see that the sense of falling off the bike goes away. The trick is now your mind has to learn to process the visual input of the road while its tilted but this it can do easily with a little practice.

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post #8 of 17 Old 10-10-2016, 07:15 AM Thread Starter
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Definitely check out this link Survival Reactions & Body Position, I found it helpful when I restarted riding a few years ago. The basic idea is to keep your head aligned with the bike as it leans so the fluid in your inner ear (sense of balance) doesn't get pushed to the left or to the right by centrifugal forces, etc. If you don't tilt your head with the bike your mind will automatically interpret it as an impending fall and cause you to panic and grab the brake or chop the throttle. Try it as an exercise in an exaggerated way and you'll see that the sense of falling off the bike goes away. The trick is now your mind has to learn to process the visual input of the road while its tilted but this it can do easily with a little practice.
Great article and tips! I took a ridelikeapro class which taught me a lot about the head turn....which I knew, but it helped to practically apply it. I have been doing that ever sense. Now I can apply these tips to my cornering. I just need to practice! Thanks!
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post #9 of 17 Old 10-10-2016, 08:40 AM
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" taught me a lot about the head turn"

Wonderful how cocking your head and looking to where you want to be in a corner makes the corner that much easier. Getting fixated on the spot in front of the tire really doesn't help!
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post #10 of 17 Old 10-10-2016, 09:02 AM
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Cavenger, good link. I do have a CD of ride like a pro. Got a new TV so I should hook up my dvd player and watch it again.
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