Peg scraping - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Riding Proficiency Tips and suggestions for improving the rider's safety skills and riding techniques

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post #1 of 35 Old 11-17-2013, 09:02 PM Thread Starter
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Peg scraping

Happened four times in as many hours, yesterday, and I was starting to think it's a problem because of the recently-lowered pegs but from what I'm gathered reading other "peg scrape" threads, here, it's more suggestive of riding technique needing improvement? What's this about "leaning more towards the 'inside' in a turn"?
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post #2 of 35 Old 11-17-2013, 09:05 PM
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You lean your body into the turn before the bike begins to lean. This will help keep the bike more up right and also enable more controlled and faster turns.

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post #3 of 35 Old 11-17-2013, 10:09 PM
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A short way before you start the turn (let's assume a left curve) shift your butt on the seat to the left side of the seat. The bike will be canted to the right. Twist your hips to the left so your right knee is lightly against the tank with your left knee dangling out. Lean your shoulders way left so you are looking over your left mirror, turn your head to look to the turn exit, and keep your eyes level. Push on your left grip to turn. Roll on the throttle. When it is time to straighten pull back on the left grip. Re center yourself if you're going straight; go all the above to the other side for a right turn.

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post #4 of 35 Old 11-18-2013, 12:05 AM
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Originally Posted by PTRider View Post
A short way before you start the turn (let's assume a left curve) shift your butt on the seat to the left side of the seat. The bike will be canted to the right. Twist your hips to the left so your right knee is lightly against the tank with your left knee dangling out. Lean your shoulders way left so you are looking over your left mirror, turn your head to look to the turn exit, and keep your eyes level. Push on your left grip to turn. Roll on the throttle. When it is time to straighten pull back on the left grip. Re center yourself if you're going straight; go all the above to the other side for a right turn.
That's a great description of the technique, but it should be noted that unless you're really hauling ass, you don't have to hang your butt off the seat and drag a knee to get lots of benefit from shifting weight. Doing all the upper body stuff described above ("kiss the mirror") will usually change the center of gravity enough to avoid scraping the pegs.

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post #5 of 35 Old 11-18-2013, 10:14 AM
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Well, not really hanging the butt off and dragging a knee, but more of just shifting to the side with both sit-bones still on the seat, and just letting the knee dangle. Riding with the balls of the feet on the pegs is a help, also.

Yes, merely leaning the body toward the pavement is a huge improvement. Many riders keep their body upright while they tilt the bike into the turn, actually lean away from the turn, and reduce ground clearance. Many more sit rigid on the bike like they're afraid to move a muscle (and they probably are, 'cuz they don't know what to do or what will happen if they move). Getting loose and feeling able to move on the bike is good and allows us to ride better in some unexpected situations.

Teaching oneself to lean toward the pavement takes effort. And, as always, we actually move much less than we think we move. What most of us consider a moderate movement would actually be a small movement if we could see a picture of ourselves.

"Older people who are reasonable, good-tempered, and gracious will bear aging well. Those who are mean-spirited and irritable will be unhappy at every period of their lives.

"Let each of use properly whatever strengths he has and strive to use them well. If he does this, he will never find himself lacking."

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post #6 of 35 Old 11-18-2013, 10:41 AM
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My pegs are not lowered but the suspension id old, 55K miles and I get the pegs to scrape at speed occasionally. I'm not a fan of leaving the seat to keep the bike more upright. Scares the crap out of me as it is! Lowered pegs just puts them closer to the ground. Ever watch a Harley with floor boards in the twisties?
Go slower, raise the ride height or raise the pegs or hang off and get the bike away from the ground.
If you buy really cheap tires they will inspire so little confidence that you won't be inclined to ride like a GP rider!
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post #7 of 35 Old 11-18-2013, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you, Gentlemen, for the advice! I've got some "practicing" to do!
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post #8 of 35 Old 11-18-2013, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by BabaAus View Post
Thank you, Gentlemen, for the advice! I've got some "practicing" to do!
one thing no one mentioned was all of this butt moving/ shifting should be done before the corner so you don't upset the balance of the bike as you enter the corner... Thanks to Keith Code
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post #9 of 35 Old 11-19-2013, 11:18 AM
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True enough about moving to the position before the corner. Just watch the racers, they move like crazy setting up for the next corner. Done well, it's very graceful.
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post #10 of 35 Old 11-19-2013, 11:51 AM
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As with a lot of movements, the timing isn't what we think it is. An early start to the movement likely finishes at the right time. A start when we think the timing is right likely ends up late.

It is easy to practice. On a straight, safe, 25 mph road, lightly put your weight on the pegs and shift your weight to the side of the seat, to the left to practice for a left turn. Lean your body to the left of the windscreen. Keep your eyes level. The bike is now running straight but canted to the right. It'll want to turn right, so a light pull on the left grip is needed to keep running straight. If you were making a left curve now, you'd just push on the left grip, and around you go. Re-center, repeat getting over to the left. Re-center and repeat several times. Now try to the right several times. Easy. When you're feeling good about moving on the bike and use it in curves, it'll feel really smooth with the bike in more control than ever.

The bike corners better when it is more upright. Aside from avoiding scraping hard parts or your boots, the suspension reacts better to bumps in the road (bumps are up & down; the suspension moves at the angle of the bike), and the tires have a more symmetrical contact patch the more upright they are.

"Older people who are reasonable, good-tempered, and gracious will bear aging well. Those who are mean-spirited and irritable will be unhappy at every period of their lives.

"Let each of use properly whatever strengths he has and strive to use them well. If he does this, he will never find himself lacking."

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