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DL1000 from 2002-2012 DL1000 from 2002-2012 (K2-L2)

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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-27-2018 07:30 PM
MAZ4ME Yes. If you drop the coolant level low enough to see the radiator internal cooling tubes and start the engine from cold, you will see 1) The coolant level will rise. 2) The temp will rise to the point where you will see coolant vapor rise from the radiator filler neck. 3) The coolant level will drop and you will see coolant flowing from the radiator coolant tubes.
The water pump is not a positive displacement pump, like an oil or fuel pump. It is actually a coolant circulating pump.
Depending on location, the thermostat has to open to allow coolant to be drawn into the water pump to be circulated or open to allow coolant to be moved into the radiator. Loose impellers are rare, but Ive seen them.
If you have a non-contact laser thermometer, you can check the radiator for clogging without touching a thing. OR... many times you can remove an adjacent hose and looking to the hose port view impeller movement while cranking the engine.
Here is a relatively inexpensive way to test for an internal coolant leak provided you have access to an aircompressor and a cheap compression tester. Fill the radiator. Remove the valve core from the compression tester's hose. You may need a 10mm or 12mm spark plug thread adapter. Get a cheap $3 chrome whistle--the kind that gals wear on a chain from Walmart in the notions department. Using a 3" piece of 8mm fuel hose, put the whistle onto the hose and thread it into the engine. Slowly rotate the engine until the whistle sounds from compression air. When the whistle sound stops remove the hose and whistle from the compression tester's. Place bike in gear, brake on. Install your compressor's air hose to the compression tester hose and see if coolant is pushed out of the radiator. If not, youre OK. It it pushes out coolant, you have a breach from the combustion chamber to the cooling system. It takes longer to type this out than to actually do the testing. You posted that the cylinder head was removed, and anything can happen. This rudimentary leakdown test will verify it's condition. Sometimes it takes a minute for the breach to make itself known.
A leak of this type will over-pressurize the cooling system and show up as external leaks. You can start the engine from cold, let it run for 10 minutes and if the radiator hoses are rock-hard you have something happening. With a pressure tester on the radiator, you can rev the engine and look for a large pressure rise.
On the positive side you say the coolant level isnt dropping. You say the fans are working--when they come on is the air from them hot or cold? Does this overheat condition happen just at an extended idle or at a constant road speed of 40 mph and above?
10-27-2018 05:27 PM
hinow41
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAZ4ME View Post
If there is any doubt, I'd replace the thermostat while it's easily accessible. It's possible you have a sticking or inoperable thermostat, and that could eliminate that possibility. Just asking, but when the temp gauge shows high is the radiator core cool to the touch?(careful, engine off, fan off)
I will check tonight.
Any advice on how to tell if the water pump impeller is working?
10-27-2018 12:22 PM
MAZ4ME
Quote:
Originally Posted by hinow41 View Post
Wondering if I should just replace the thermostat while I have the plastics off.
If there is any doubt, I'd replace the thermostat while it's easily accessible. It's possible you have a sticking or inoperable thermostat, and that could eliminate that possibility. Just asking, but when the temp gauge shows high is the radiator core cool to the touch?(careful, engine off, fan off)
10-27-2018 11:55 AM
MAZ4ME ST, yes, the Mazda6 V6 coil-on-plug connectors are brittle and break easily. Nylon zip-ties to the rescue. The earlier 626 had plug wires with a distributor with an internal coil, the later 626 had a single coil pack feeding all the plug wires.
And it isnt too bad removing the upper intake..as long as you take out the 2 EGR mounting bolts 1st. I never did like taking off intake manifolds and plenums just to get to a maintenance item like spark plugs. If this is an '03 or later it is a Mazda6, if '02 and earlier, it is a 626.
The Mazda 6 V6 is known for water pump leaks, a deteriorated hose connector that feeds the throttle body just behind and to the left of the battery viewed while standing in front of the engine compartment. With miles, you touch it, you break it. Fiberglass-reinforced plastic comes with an attached heater hose. I just did one 3 weeks ago at home. Also, there is a short elbow hose coming off the top rear of the water pump, and it leaks down the front of the transmission. The same V6 in my Mazda Tribute is seeping a bit now, new hose and clamps sitting on my workbench.
The 626 was known for water pump leaks, radiator leaks, and Ive done a few heater cores as well in them.
Toyotas, in some cases, are typically better engineered with higher-spec components. But like all cars, they have their issues as well. My Mazdas have been bulletproof, but they get maintained within an inch of their lives.

I guess if you had to compare, you could say...(dont laugh)....Toyota=BMW R12XX GS, Mazda= '14+ Suzuki DL1000.
T think there's another thread here that talks one against the other...LOL.
10-27-2018 10:39 AM
STCorndog
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAZ4ME View Post
That's correct, "Who knows?"
Which is why we diagnose. Then we know for sure. It could be this, that, or the other. Or none of the above and something entirely different. We arent there to see this individual vehicle.

This is neither of our 1st rodeos. 43 years of turning wrenches professionally in independent shops and dealerships, you develop a diagnostic path of automotive problem solving.
Cooling system diagnosis in motorcycles is no different than any other vehicles.
Good point. I had a co-worker come in and ask me about the heat in his Maz 626. Said it would not give him heat until he ran it hard at speed. Somehow I have become the "car whisperer" at work. Anyways, I explained how the heat worked and things to check, but first told him to check the coolant level. Well, it was low.

He was over-joyed to have heat and thought we solved his problem. Then I broke the news to him, that coolant went somewhere. I have him monitoring the level to see if it is dropping. I have not looked under the hood yet. May be consulting with you MAZ4ME.

I am not over-impressed with the car yet. I had to replace 2 coil packs before we ended up doing them all. It is a V-6 and getting the rear cylinder bank done was not any fun. The connectors on the coils were about as cheesy as they come too. I guess Toyota has me spoiled, that is all I have owned for years, 3 in the garage now and what I am most familiar with.
10-27-2018 10:33 AM
hinow41 Thank you all for giving me some ideas, Hopefully I can figure this out and actually ride. Iv had the bike for 2 years now and only done 1000 miles

Last night I looked over every hose made sure they are all tight. Ran the bike for maybe 5 mins the gauge went all the way to 5 bars and coolant was going into the overflow, then I shut it off. My plan for tonight is to do a pressure test on the cooling system. If that reads well I'm going to take a look at the water pump impeller. Test the fan switch, and get a temp gun to see if the coolant line coming into the engine is the same temp as whats coming out. I read this post https://www.stromtrooper.com/dl1000-...any-ideas.html Wondering if I should just replace the thermostat while I have the plastics off.
10-27-2018 02:59 AM
MAZ4ME
Quote:
Originally Posted by STCorndog View Post
MAZ4ME,

I am 1>2 you are 2>1. Who knows?
That's correct, "Who knows?"
Which is why we diagnose. Then we know for sure. It could be this, that, or the other. Or none of the above and something entirely different. We arent there to see this individual vehicle.

This is neither of our 1st rodeos. 43 years of turning wrenches professionally in independent shops and dealerships, you develop a diagnostic path of automotive problem solving.
Cooling system diagnosis in motorcycles is no different than any other vehicles.
10-27-2018 01:33 AM
eightyseven My V did the same a few years ago. The water pump seal was starting to fail and a small amount of coolant was getting into the drain cavity and out the overflow tube where it dripped on the exhaust. I lived with it until it started dripping on the floor. Then I resealed the water pump.
10-26-2018 11:35 PM
STCorndog MAZ4ME,

I am 1>2 you are 2>1. Who knows?

The strom has a fan switch that is on one cylinder head. It triggers the fan at a preset temperature, just like a car. When mine failed, at first the gauge went from routinely running at 3 bars to running at 4, under the same ambient conditions. Then it failed and if the air flow (bike speed) was low enough, the thing would throw 5 bars and overheat. The strom is blessed with a big radiator, catching a lot of air flow, my bike hardly ever ran the fan until the switch puked. When it did, the coolant heated, pressurized and then went past the rad cap valve.
10-26-2018 09:49 PM
MAZ4ME Actually ST, either I am not seeing the sequence of events, or we're not getting all the information.
My suggestion of a pressure test was in reference to how to look for an external engine leak.
But in all cases of overheat and/or coolant loss the 1st thing I did was a leakdown test. You'd be surprised how many engines Ive tested had a warped head, cracked head, or breach in the head gasket. It doesnt matter what else is bad--and there is no law stating you can have only one issue at a time--if the basic engine has an issue it must be addressed 1st.
Oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil is never a good thing.
The original poster stated he was riding and the temp was in the 70s. If he was riding at speed and not idling, neither the fan switch, circuit, or fan itself would be an issue as air draft at speed would have cooled the radiator.
As posted above, pressure testing the radiator cap could find a fault...but then again the original poster stated that the radiator and coolant reservoir levels were good.
A clogged or partially clogged radiator is also a possibility, as is a loose water pump impeller, both of which Ive seen many times on various vehicles.
It's all a matter of heat transfer. Engine heat-->coolant-->radiator(through thermostat)-->outside air--> back to engine. Anything that interferes with that heat transfer is a problem.
Then you have the issue that the cooling system is operating correctly and the problem centeres around the temp gauge, its sending unit, and related wiring.
As always, methodical diagnosis in sequence is the key to not only finding the problem, but any possible related problems.
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