Valve stem leak/ dry rot - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Maintenance, Tech and Products. Maintenance questions, how to threads and product information/reviews.

 9Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Brookfield
Posts: 113
Valve stem leak/ dry rot

I noticed last night when checking my tires when I moved the valve stem to check pressure/add air I could hear the sound of an air leak on the front. Looking at the valve stems it appears they are dry rotted back one doesn't look much better. The previous owner installed new Anakee 3s in 4/2015, not sure if new stems were installed then tires only have a bout 2000 miles (I just bought the bike this and am adding miles daily)and are not dry rotted. My question is has anybody on here changed valve stems while the tires are on the bike? The vid linked below shows what I am planning to try. I have a variety of clamps even a large metal clamp I used for compressing high power air gun springs during disassembly. I ordered rubber 412 straight stems because I don't want/need angled stems. I plan to rip or cut the tops of the stems off then put some soap on the new ones and try to push them through. My main concern is breaking/reinstalling the bead without damaging the tire. Hopefully with a combination of tire levers and the lamps I can break the bead where I need to change the stems and get the tire out of my way and then try to wrestle the new ones in. I put a ring of superglue around the stems last night as a temporary fix and road slow and easy to work today (I have a car, but the weather is nice and my commute is short and can be 30mph if I choose to go the speed limit . So anybody use this method for changing stems, I couldn't find anything on here with a search. Seems like a neat trick to save some time if it works on bigger bike tires instead of small Chinese scooters as done in the vid linked below.


Last edited by Plateauplower; 07-25-2019 at 11:32 AM.
Plateauplower is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 11:52 AM
$tromtrooper
 
dravnx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: santa rosa, ca
Posts: 820
Not only would I change the valve stems, I would replace the tires as well. Though they may not appear checked or rotted, the rubber has deteriorated and is hard. The tires were changed 4 years ago. Check the date code to see how long they sat around before being installed.
Motorpsychology likes this.

L2 DL650 Adventure


bike X miles=smiles
smiles bike=miles
smiles miles=bike.
It's simple math.
https://www.directavionics.com/
dravnx is online now  
post #3 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 12:03 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Brookfield
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by dravnx View Post
Not only would I change the valve stems, I would replace the tires as well. Though they may not appear checked or rotted, the rubber has deteriorated and is hard. The tires were changed 4 years ago. Check the date code to see how long they sat around before being installed.
I agree that the tires are getting older, I'm not sure I would throw away low mileage Michelin tires at 4 years old unless I was going on a trip. I will likely change the tires next season, I should buy another set of Anakee 3s while they are $210 on Revzilla, but I am kind of leaning toward Shinko 705s because I like the more aggressive look and they seem good for the riding I do can get those for about $140 set on Amazon. I think I'll just stick with the stems for now, and keep it under 100 WHat kind of fish are you holding in your avi? They almost look like bighead carp

Last edited by Plateauplower; 07-25-2019 at 12:05 PM.
Plateauplower is offline  
 
post #4 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 12:48 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
PerazziMx14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,660
It is not common practice to change the valve stems when the tires are changed. It is likely that the same valve stems are on the wheels for years and live through multiple tires swaps.

Tires do not have a shelf life. No tire manufacturer puts an expiration date on the their tires because of way to many variables. A tire that is housed in a cool dark dry place will be usable for many years. Take the same tire and put it in Death Valley where it get extreme exposure to UV rays and lots of heat and with 6 months to a year it'll start to degrade and dry rot.

This is why when you see RV's parked for long duration most have tire covers on them to shield the tires from UV rays that quickly degrade them.
Plateauplower likes this.
PerazziMx14 is online now  
post #5 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Brookfield
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerazziMx14 View Post
It is not common practice to change the valve stems when the tires are changed. It is likely that the same valve stems are on the wheels for years and live through multiple tires swaps.

Tires do not have a shelf life. No tire manufacturer puts an expiration date on the their tires because of way to many variables. A tire that is housed in a cool dark dry place will be usable for many years. Take the same tire and put it in Death Valley where it get extreme exposure to UV rays and lots of heat and with 6 months to a year it'll start to degrade and dry rot.

This is why when you see RV's parked for long duration most have tire covers on them to shield the tires from UV rays that quickly degrade them.
I agree. This bike has been stored indoors and had not been ridden much since the current tires were installed. They look just fine for me, I'm not super aggressive in curves, if I was going to try a track-day sure new rubber meant for that would be higher on the priority list. Agree storage makes a difference, but if they were 10 years or more on the bike, I would probably change them anyway. I had a pretty new looking helmet that was about 12 years old, I bought a new one just because but I am sure the older one would still do the job, the insulation wasn't disintegrating or anything. If things go sideways and I see cracking etc when removing from the beads I'll consider new rubbber this year, otherwise I'll probably put some miles on these until the front starts to wear down and change both (apparently people generally go through 2 fronts for each rear with Anakee 3s on Vstroms).
Plateauplower is offline  
post #6 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 01:12 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pasadna area
Posts: 13,902
I mentioned it before that the Vintage guys, bikes and cars, run decades old tires. Unless the tire is absolutely falling apart as long as their is tread they insist on keeping the tires.
Most of their driving is relatively slow going. If one has a fleet of old stuff, think Jay Leno, keeping fresh rubber would be expensive.
With 1, 2 bikes, getting Shinko's would be a no brainer.
notacop is offline  
post #7 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Brookfield
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by notacop View Post
I mentioned it before that the Vintage guys, bikes and cars, run decades old tires. Unless the tire is absolutely falling apart as long as their is tread they insist on keeping the tires.
Most of their driving is relatively slow going. If one has a fleet of old stuff, think Jay Leno, keeping fresh rubber would be expensive.
With 1, 2 bikes, getting Shinko's would be a no brainer.
Yeah, if tires are not cracking I consider them reasonably safe, a catastrophic failure can happen on a new tire as well from road debris etc. Embarrassed to admit it but I have tires on my flat bed trailer that are so cracked I cringe when taking it anywhere, but they haven't failed even when being loaded down with stuff like loads of mulch for the yard etc. I am thinking about ordering a set of the Shinko 705 radials though, I have enough amazon points right now they would only be $40 out of pocket, but still wont install until beginning of next season at the earliest. I take it you have 705s, how do you like them as an all around tire?
Plateauplower is offline  
post #8 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 03:05 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
locoblanco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Arizona
Posts: 901
Garage
Instead of pushing the new stem thru, pull it with the proper tool. Only a couple bucks at any auto part store. Looks like a metal valve cap with a t handle thru the top. It will make the job a lot easier. Note the ring around the base of the valve and be sure it is showing all around when you pull it thru, otherwise the stem can slip back inside the tire.
Plateauplower likes this.

I don't want a pickle, I just want to ride my motorsickle. A. Guthrie.
locoblanco is offline  
post #9 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 03:17 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
locoblanco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Arizona
Posts: 901
Garage
Slip the valve in from the inside, (obviously), screw the tool on, hook two fingers around the t handle and pull straight until the ridge indicated by the arrow is showing all around. Use the appropriate tire lube, or just a bit of soapy water if noting else is handy. Do not use wd40 or any other petroleum based lube, it's bad for the rubber.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20190725_111203_1564078429435.jpg (214.2 KB, 6 views)
Plateauplower likes this.

I don't want a pickle, I just want to ride my motorsickle. A. Guthrie.
locoblanco is offline  
post #10 of 24 Old 07-25-2019, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Brookfield
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by locoblanco View Post
Slip the valve in from the inside, (obviously), screw the tool on, hook two fingers around the t handle and pull straight until the ridge indicated by the arrow is showing all around. Use the appropriate tire lube, or just a bit of soapy water if noting else is handy. Do not use wd40 or any other petroleum based lube, it's bad for the rubber.
Thanks, yea I have that tool and a longer valve stem puller arriving today. I didn't order any tire lube have always used dish soap on MX tires and hoping that works. I'm not sure if I will be able to use the longer tool as it might not thread on with the rotors where they are, but the shorter valve tool should fit, I wasn't sure how much force was required. Good to know that the rubber rib in the pic is basically an indicator for being seated. I didn't want to pull it too much and risk damaging the valve or have it not all the way seated. Doe the clamp and doing it with the tire on the bike sound reasonable?
Plateauplower is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome