2012 + DL650 Clutch adjustment - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 12 Old 06-22-2014, 12:34 AM Thread Starter
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2012 + DL650 Clutch adjustment

50,000k's, the gearbox is starting to clunk going from neutral into 1st, and oh , go to adjust the clutch freeplay and no more turns left on the adjuster.

First, don't panic, there are some turns left on the perch adjuster which will save the day.

Next, do what every smart Stromtrooper does, email Greywolf and ask how do I adjust this thing ?.

Get a reply, that's easy, except, the adjuster is now on the end of the clutch, INSIDE the engine, so order a new gasket and put it on the todo list for the 54,000k's oil change.

So, finally time, drain the oil, change the filter, replace the drain plug and fit the new filter.

Have a bucket standing by and undo the lower drain bolt on the water pump, watch the water dribble, out, undo the radiator cap and hastily move the bucket back two feet. (sigh).

Next, remove the hoses to the water pump, all but one are spring clips, I found a pair of right-angle pliers magic here.

Undo all the bolts, INCLUDING the three on the water pump. For those into bling, m6x30 and the three water pump bolts are m6x70. I replaced mine with stainless steel cap screws on reassembly. Undo the footpeg/brake mount and tie it back out of the way.

Next, very GENTLY pry the cases apart, I tapped it with a plastic mallet, there are some tabs for prying, but BE GENTLE and DO NOT lever on the water pump. The b******* cases will come apart eventually.

Note: Provided you don't provoke it, the water pump will stay in one piece and you won't need a new water pump gasket.

Stare the the remains of gasket stuck to each side of the cases and curse some. This was the bit that took the most time (2 hours !!!! ) until I remembered I had one of those tools made of unobtainium in the kitchen, a gasket knife. Took five minutes to get the gasket remains off then.

Note: Gasket knives are sold under false pretenses, supermarkets around here hide them next to the kiwifruit. Lovely hard plastic, serrated edges and won't cut aluminium but hard and sharp enough to rip stuck pieces of gasket off engine cases - perfect.

Slacken off the clutch cable and perch adjusters, undo the locknut in the centre of the clutch, wind the screw in until it touches, back off one turn, lock it back down.

That's a bit tricky, I had a couple of fingers around the spanner on the inner part of the adjuster, my thumb on the end of the screw to stop it rotating and nipped it up with the other hand. Someone else holding the screw still would be easier.

Readjust the freeplay on the clutch cable at this point.

There are a couple of spigots in the side cases for location. Pick them up off the floor , or pull them out of the external half of the side case and put them back into the engine side.

Tip: If you THINLY coat the gasket with copper anti-seize it'll still seal perfectly, but won't bed into the cases next time. That's just a tip, not essential. And by thin, I mean thin, the gasket should just be a different color with no obvious grease on it.

Place the gasket onto the engine side, the spigots will hold it in place, quick eye check to make sure it's in place all around, then slide the side case back into place, keeping it very flat. Note that you have to get the oil/water pump gear to mesh, just wiggle the water pump a little as you push on the side case and everything should just pop into place.

Check that the case is seated all around, start putting screws in. If there's ANY resistance, stop because you'll be trying to push a bolt through the gasket which has slipped out of place

Run all the screws in, then start tightening, zigzag side to side. Don't torque them at this point, just until they bottom, then go around again, just nipping them up. I do this by feel, but if you feel brave, use a torque wrench.

Reinstall the footpeg/brake mount.

Reinstall the hoses, making the traditional offering of blood to the Gods, order is important here, that big one that runs through the engine has to go back on before the little hose above it.

Refill the radiator, put the cap on, lean the bike over as far left and right as you can, giving it a good shake each time, take the cap back off and put that last 200ml of fluid in. Cap back on.

Refill with oil. Start the engine, let it run 30 seconds, go have a coffee, then come back and put that last 300ml of oil in. (I changed the filter, which doesn't refill without running the engine for a few seconds).

Clean up and go for a test ride, clunk neutral to first has gone and the bike shifts nicely.

Comments:

I think if I did this again, I'd drop in fresh friction plates and springs anyway at this point. As far as I could tell the plates had used < 1/3 of the material and I'd definitely have to do the plates plates/springs next time as I'd be out of adjuster. It's not essential on this one, but all the effort is getting in there, changing the plates and springs is cheap and trivially easy in comparison.

Thanks Greywolf, wouldn't have been possible without your help.

Pete
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post #2 of 12 Old 02-23-2018, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteW View Post
50,000k's, the gearbox is starting to clunk going from neutral into 1st, and oh , go to adjust the clutch freeplay and no more turns left on the adjuster.

First, don't panic, there are some turns left on the perch adjuster which will save the day.

Next, do what every smart Stromtrooper does, email Greywolf and ask how do I adjust this thing ?.

Get a reply, that's easy, except, the adjuster is now on the end of the clutch, INSIDE the engine, so order a new gasket and put it on the todo list for the 54,000k's oil change.

So, finally time, drain the oil, change the filter, replace the drain plug and fit the new filter.

Have a bucket standing by and undo the lower drain bolt on the water pump, watch the water dribble, out, undo the radiator cap and hastily move the bucket back two feet. (sigh).

Next, remove the hoses to the water pump, all but one are spring clips, I found a pair of right-angle pliers magic here.

Undo all the bolts, INCLUDING the three on the water pump. For those into bling, m6x30 and the three water pump bolts are m6x70. I replaced mine with stainless steel cap screws on reassembly. Undo the footpeg/brake mount and tie it back out of the way.

Next, very GENTLY pry the cases apart, I tapped it with a plastic mallet, there are some tabs for prying, but BE GENTLE and DO NOT lever on the water pump. The b******* cases will come apart eventually.

Note: Provided you don't provoke it, the water pump will stay in one piece and you won't need a new water pump gasket.

Stare the the remains of gasket stuck to each side of the cases and curse some. This was the bit that took the most time (2 hours !!!! ) until I remembered I had one of those tools made of unobtainium in the kitchen, a gasket knife. Took five minutes to get the gasket remains off then.

Note: Gasket knives are sold under false pretenses, supermarkets around here hide them next to the kiwifruit. Lovely hard plastic, serrated edges and won't cut aluminium but hard and sharp enough to rip stuck pieces of gasket off engine cases - perfect.

Slacken off the clutch cable and perch adjusters, undo the locknut in the centre of the clutch, wind the screw in until it touches, back off one turn, lock it back down.

That's a bit tricky, I had a couple of fingers around the spanner on the inner part of the adjuster, my thumb on the end of the screw to stop it rotating and nipped it up with the other hand. Someone else holding the screw still would be easier.

Readjust the freeplay on the clutch cable at this point.

There are a couple of spigots in the side cases for location. Pick them up off the floor , or pull them out of the external half of the side case and put them back into the engine side.

Tip: If you THINLY coat the gasket with copper anti-seize it'll still seal perfectly, but won't bed into the cases next time. That's just a tip, not essential. And by thin, I mean thin, the gasket should just be a different color with no obvious grease on it.

Place the gasket onto the engine side, the spigots will hold it in place, quick eye check to make sure it's in place all around, then slide the side case back into place, keeping it very flat. Note that you have to get the oil/water pump gear to mesh, just wiggle the water pump a little as you push on the side case and everything should just pop into place.

Check that the case is seated all around, start putting screws in. If there's ANY resistance, stop because you'll be trying to push a bolt through the gasket which has slipped out of place

Run all the screws in, then start tightening, zigzag side to side. Don't torque them at this point, just until they bottom, then go around again, just nipping them up. I do this by feel, but if you feel brave, use a torque wrench.

Reinstall the footpeg/brake mount.

Reinstall the hoses, making the traditional offering of blood to the Gods, order is important here, that big one that runs through the engine has to go back on before the little hose above it.

Refill the radiator, put the cap on, lean the bike over as far left and right as you can, giving it a good shake each time, take the cap back off and put that last 200ml of fluid in. Cap back on.

Refill with oil. Start the engine, let it run 30 seconds, go have a coffee, then come back and put that last 300ml of oil in. (I changed the filter, which doesn't refill without running the engine for a few seconds).

Clean up and go for a test ride, clunk neutral to first has gone and the bike shifts nicely.

Comments:

I think if I did this again, I'd drop in fresh friction plates and springs anyway at this point. As far as I could tell the plates had used < 1/3 of the material and I'd definitely have to do the plates plates/springs next time as I'd be out of adjuster. It's not essential on this one, but all the effort is getting in there, changing the plates and springs is cheap and trivially easy in comparison.

Thanks Greywolf, wouldn't have been possible without your help.

Pete
Pete I'm on 41k miles and the screw clutch lever adjuster almost on the end. If this is the only way, as it seems, is there any chance to find pictures or even a video somewhere of what's described please? Sounds bit scary hight tech stuff. Many thanks!!

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post #3 of 12 Old 02-23-2018, 03:46 PM
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I normally won't respond to tech questions by e-mail or PM. Keep them in the proper forum on the site where more people can learn and/or answer.
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Pat- 2007 DL650A was ridden to all 48 contiguous states. I didn't quite make it to 17,000 miles on the 2012 DL650A.
Nicknames I use to lessen typing, Vee = 2002-2012 DL1000s. Vee2=2014-2016 DL1000s. Wee = 2004-2011 DL650s. Glee = 2012-2016 DL650s
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post #4 of 12 Old 02-23-2018, 05:36 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry there isn't a video. I'd have needed a second person standing by to record it and didn't. If there had been a second person their hands would have been full at critical points holding stuff for me anyway. Particularly when doing the adjustment itself.

It's not difficult, it just took time and the only clever tool needed was the gasket scraper and there are other ways to do that. You can probably buy gasket softener in a can for example. The locknut adjustment is tricky in that unless you have good coordination you may have to do it a few times to get it right but it's also not something that'll break easily either. Look over the area before you start, clean it down give yourself plenty of time and make sure you have all the parts and fluids necessary on hand.
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post #5 of 12 Old 04-08-2018, 04:57 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteW View Post
Sorry there isn't a video. I'd have needed a second person standing by to record it and didn't. If there had been a second person their hands would have been full at critical points holding stuff for me anyway. Particularly when doing the adjustment itself.

It's not difficult, it just took time and the only clever tool needed was the gasket scraper and there are other ways to do that. You can probably buy gasket softener in a can for example. The locknut adjustment is tricky in that unless you have good coordination you may have to do it a few times to get it right but it's also not something that'll break easily either. Look over the area before you start, clean it down give yourself plenty of time and make sure you have all the parts and fluids necessary on hand.
Thanks very much Pete. I never had this open but checked some pictures and my manual to see what I'm looking for here. Sorry if I'll sound silly here, I appreciate your advice. If I understand it correctly. Is it the clutch cover on those springs which disengage the plates and its connected to the screw in the middle of the clutch? So is the "play" of this clutch cover the point? Am i actually trying to change the distance between this clutch cover and the clutch plates? That means bringing it closer or further? So if I push the screw in the middle of the clutch back, will I bring the clutch cover closer, is that the point, is that what I'm trying to achieve here? As said I never saw it real, apart of those pictures. So apologies if I'm totally ignorant. Many thanks for your advice indeed**

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post #6 of 12 Old 04-09-2018, 01:52 AM Thread Starter
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The clutch release is a rod that runs through the engine, that goes onto a thrust bearing which pushes the top plate back against the clutch springs. Doing that allows the plates to separate. The adjuster is the other side of that thrust washer.

What the adjuster does is make sure that the spacing of the bits & pieces is right mechanically. i.e. that the clutch plates have enough headroom to release, and are close enough to engage.

So as above, back off the adjuster by the lever some just so that's out of play. Loosen off the lock nut, wind the screw in until you can feel resistance, out one turn and tighten the lock nut back up. Then readjust the cable free play up by the lever and check the clutch action.

Provided the clutch plates are still in spec that's all that's required. If that's not enough odds are there are worn plates but I seriously doubt that'd be the case first time in there. In my case I'm still good at 120,000k's so I'm thinking poorly adjusted at the factory in my case.
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post #7 of 12 Old 04-12-2018, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteW View Post
The clutch release is a rod that runs through the engine, that goes onto a thrust bearing which pushes the top plate back against the clutch springs. Doing that allows the plates to separate. The adjuster is the other side of that thrust washer.

What the adjuster does is make sure that the spacing of the bits & pieces is right mechanically. i.e. that the clutch plates have enough headroom to release, and are close enough to engage.

So as above, back off the adjuster by the lever some just so that's out of play. Loosen off the lock nut, wind the screw in until you can feel resistance, out one turn and tighten the lock nut back up. Then readjust the cable free play up by the lever and check the clutch action.

Provided the clutch plates are still in spec that's all that's required. If that's not enough odds are there are worn plates but I seriously doubt that'd be the case first time in there. In my case I'm still good at 120,000k's so I'm thinking poorly adjusted at the factory in my case.
Many thanks Pete! I wonder if I should have the plates ready just in case but I definitely need a new gaskett right? I drain the oil but do I also need to get the coolant out when the clutch cover with a water pump on it comes down? (Only have changed the coolant recently). One more thing, that rod I can put back from the same side where the nut is right? It's no need to open the other side of the engine? Again sorry to bother with probably silly questions. It's a great help to get an advice from you instead of learning the hard way.

Oh you see when I got you on the line, have you ever check the valve clearance? I'm on 41k miles and thinking of doing it along the clutch...dont think it was ever done?! Thanks thousands Pete*

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post #8 of 12 Old 04-13-2018, 04:17 AM Thread Starter
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You need a gasket at least. Friction plates are optional, springs would be a higher priority than plates as well. Easy to check the thickness of the stack at least if you have it open.

Coolant, there's a bolt on the water pump assembly, undo that and water goes everywhere but it drains everything well. The pump is sealed and you only need to drain the radiator because you can't get that case off without taking the hoses off the pump. (Feel free to prove me wrong )

The rod goes in the opposite side from the adjuster, so no. But there is no need to touch the rod or the other side of the engine other than making sure the cable adjuster is slacked off some at the bars.

I've checked valve clearances, personally I'd rather pay a shop to do the adjustment if they were out. That's just me. Taping cardboard over the inside of the radiator is a good idea and you need to take the tank off - with that you can pop the heads off. It's a flexible/reusable gasket under each head, it's a bit of a bitch to get it back into place particularly around the spark plugs but otherwise the whole checking the clearances bit is easy. Adjusting the clearances is a lot harder.
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post #9 of 12 Old 04-13-2018, 06:18 AM
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You need a gasket at least. Friction plates are optional, springs would be a higher priority than plates as well. Easy to check the thickness of the stack at least if you have it open.

Coolant, there's a bolt on the water pump assembly, undo that and water goes everywhere but it drains everything well. The pump is sealed and you only need to drain the radiator because you can't get that case off without taking the hoses off the pump. (Feel free to prove me wrong )

The rod goes in the opposite side from the adjuster, so no. But there is no need to touch the rod or the other side of the engine other than making sure the cable adjuster is slacked off some at the bars.

I've checked valve clearances, personally I'd rather pay a shop to do the adjustment if they were out. That's just me. Taping cardboard over the inside of the radiator is a good idea and you need to take the tank off - with that you can pop the heads off. It's a flexible/reusable gasket under each head, it's a bit of a bitch to get it back into place particularly around the spark plugs but otherwise the whole checking the clearances bit is easy. Adjusting the clearances is a lot harder.
Thank you Pete!

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post #10 of 12 Old 04-13-2018, 09:32 AM
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Thank you Pete!

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I finally found a picture of the clutch assembly for 2012+. There really is an adjuster in the middle of it lol. I saw images from the previous model and thought the adjustment us hidden somewhere below it. As you suggested in your first post, I'll simply have it all changed once in there. Many many thanks Pete and all P

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