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General V-Strom Discussion Talk about all things V-Strom not limited to just one of the above models

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post #121 of 165 Old 11-22-2019, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by newride View Post
"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."
Despite being fully aware of it, it is still difficult for the intelligent (even only moderately intelligent) to fully comprehend the stupid, and their lack of comprehension of things that seem obvious and simple to us.

The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity
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post #122 of 165 Old 11-22-2019, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by VSrider View Post
Here's another. "I don't need protective gear because I'm not planning on having an accident"
Probably no worse than "I need protective gear because I am planning on having an accident.........."
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post #123 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 01:40 AM
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So EMT's rarely attend motorcycle accidents in your area to find the rider wearing ATGATT?
That is very interesting and surely indicates that ATGATT wearers must be the more skilled and competent riders on your roads.
It's more that gear of any sort is very rare around here. Helmets of any kind are very uncommon. Most riders are bareheaded, and most of the few who bother to wear helmets are sporting useless plastic yarmulkes. I'd say real full face helmets account for less than 5% of the riders you see in Indiana.

It's quite common in hot weather to see men riding along shirtless and wearing flip-flops. Perfectly legal here, for some reason.

It depends a bit on the weather; obviously the unhelmeted generally only appear in warm sunny weather.






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As a rider, you have had FOUR accidents???? And you lead group rides??? You definitely need ATGATT!! Yikes!! That's the poorest safety record I've seen, short of Evel Kneival. What are the odds?
Well, I'm leaving out countless off-road drops on my KLR...

Mostly unlucky, I guess. I ride a crapton of miles, and when it's not snowing, a motorcycle is my primary transportation. FWIW, all of the accidents happened in ordinary situations at ordinary speeds. Two were on the way home from work.

Broken femur #1 was a fresh spill of cooking grease in 2007. It was near dusk, just plonking along after work and heading home. No way to see the grease until I was in it. Lowsided, whacked a curb really damn hard. My wife and I went by the scene on the way home from the hospital three days later and the grease had attracted enough dirt that we could follow the trail back to the last restaurant, and all the way out to the highway. That was a freak accident, and the fresh grease was not really visible. I'm not counting that as avoidable.


Broken femur #2 and wrist #1 (and a cracked ankle) in 2011 was an unlicensed left-turning phone-poker who pulled a quadruple reverse triple fakeout maneuver and at the worst possible second, decided to floor it through the intersection. Like all of us, I've dodged countless phone pokers and blind left turners, and I'm pretty damn hard to kill. But this one got me. From a certain point of view, I almost made it -- she caught the left side of my bike's engine with the left corner of the car and shoved the engine about three inches to the right.

Whether that one was avoidable is hard to say; my only real option while she was playing stop/go/stop/go was to stop dead and see what the hell she was going to do, but that would risk getting hit from behind.

I generally try to think further ahead these days, and avoid being the only vehicle in intersections; if there are two lanes, I'll try to position myself to use a car as a shield, but sometimes that's not possible so you have to move as far away in the lane as you can and hope they don't get a text.


Broken femur #3 and wrist #2 in 2013 was when I collected a 7 point buck on my KLR650. Just plonking along a country road headed to breakfast with a few buddies, and the deer crossed the road at a dead run. None of us ever paid any attention to deer hunting, and we didn't know that day (November 9) was the peak of the rut that year in this area. Since then, I don't venture into the countryside from late October through most of November, but I will ride to work, errands, etc.


#4, getting knocked off in the roundabout (unhurt) was pretty simple: I entered the 2-lane roundabout at the 9:00 position in the inner lane. I saw the Ford approaching from the 6:00 position in the outer lane, and nothing seemed amiss. Then of course had to turn my head to the left, away from the car, to continue around.

Unbeknownst to me, the driver was from rural Illinois and had never seen a roundabout in her life. So she just blasted straight through the roundabout without looking left or right, crossing from the outer lane into my inner lane. I sort of smushed into her driver's side door with the right side of my Vee at about the 3:00 point. Scared the bejeebus out of her, and she bawled nonstop for the next hour. She immediately admitted fault and her insurance took care of me, anyway (Yes, I kept the Vee. Some new scratches I'll live with and a handlebar took care of that).

I dunno, that one may have been avoidable. Nowadays I time my entries to roundabouts to ensure that I can't fall victim to idiots like that again. I do have to say, the concept of the roundabout worked well; when there is an accident, it's at low speed.




Quote:
Originally Posted by muleskinner View Post
Just curious: what do you all think of these two common motorcyclist proclamations?

"There are two kinds of riders: those who have gone down and those who will."

"I had to lay it down to avoid serious injury."

On the first one, it's sort of useless and I think it's even counterproductive. Motorcycles are all about risk management; we do what we need to bring the risk into an acceptable zone, where the pleasure outweighs the fear and doubt. (After hitting that deer in 2013, I can't enjoy riding in the countryside during the rut when I know the deer are more active and the risk is elevated. So I don't. At other times, deer risk is still there, but I can accept it.) Sure, the ideal is a lifetime on a motorcycle without injury, and we're all striving for that, but I can't think of any highly active riders I know who haven't tested their gear.

In other words, saying "Yer gunna crash, punk! We all crash!" is just pointless. And entirely missing the point. It's a lot more rational and productive to discuss the risks and hey, we've got a great way to manage those risks nowadays. Remember, good comfortable reasonably priced armored gear hasn't been widely available for all that long, relatively speaking -- maybe 20 years. And in the last 10 years or so, new materials, standards and testing have really made gear and helmets light-years better; lighter, more comfortable, more protective, and cheaper.



And the "lay 'er down" morons... yeek. I did once risk serious injury when some beardy biker bro was telling some yarn about "layin' 'er down" to avoid a crash. "Oh, so you crashed before you crashed because you didn't want to crash? I don't get it..."

I've also heard Olde Bikers telling Olde Biker Tales about "layin' 'er down" then somehow ending up on top of the bike and gracefully surfing to a stop. Or "layin' 'er down" so the footpeg would dig in and stop sooner. They must be brave for leaving the house at all on tires that damn slippery.

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Last edited by bwringer; 11-23-2019 at 01:50 AM.
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post #124 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by bwringer View Post
Remember, good comfortable reasonably priced armored gear hasn't been widely available for all that long, relatively speaking -- maybe 20 years. And in the last 10 years or so, new materials, standards and testing have really made gear and helmets light-years better; lighter, more comfortable, more protective, and cheaper.
Good point.

I give thanks to whoever came up with the armored mesh jacket.
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post #125 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by muleskinner View Post
Good point.

I give thanks to whoever came up with the armored mesh jacket.
Me too.

Thanks to THIS:




and THIS:


and THIS:


all doing what they were supposed to do, I was able to walk away from THIS:


with nothing more than a scraped elbow and a contusion on my left leg next to the shin. I hit either the handlebars or the windshield, or both, on my way off the bike. I remember bouncing and tumbling and rolling, but never lost consciousness or suffered a concussion, as near as anyone could tell.

ATGATT, because you only have time to get your gear on BEFORE you need it.
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Last edited by ibike2havefun; 11-23-2019 at 09:00 AM.
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post #126 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 09:12 AM
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My first wet weather gear was a plastic rubbish bag with holes cut for arms and head. If it were just cold, and not wet, the plastic bag would go inside of my army surplus jacket instead.
Then they bought out the rule that over 30mph you needed to wear a helmet and I bought my first (2nd hand) helmet. It was a Jet style - white with a red stripe. I felt like I was on a mission to attack the bridges at Toko-Ri. Flash as - most people were still wearing pudding bowl helmets.
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post #127 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 10:23 AM
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although i occasionally ride the 2 residential blocks to the gas (petrol) station to fill up, i'm atgat....
the potential passenger problem is solved by removing the passenger pegs....

2 asides:
1) my father strongly disapproved of mc's (imagine continuous "you'll shoot our eye out" sorts of comments for 50yrs), but he rode a bicycke & ignored that fact that he was lucky to survive 2 collisions w/ trucks riding backroads of western pa.....
2) my 38yr old son cracked his pelvis a month ago falling off a motorized skateboard (the one w/ a single center wheel).... this father's admonitions were only credible because thrill-seeking son knows protective gear saved my ass more than once....

no one gets outa here alive....
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post #128 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 10:26 AM
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Dress for the Slide Not the Ride
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"There comes a time in the affairs of men, when we must take the bull by the tail and face the situation."
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post #129 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by muleskinner View Post
Just curious: what do you all think of these two common motorcyclist proclamations?

"There are two kinds of riders: those who have gone down and those who will." From my experience and that of my friends, this holds a lot of truth. Not universal though since I have a couple friends that have never gone down. I also had a friend that was conscientious about riding within his limits and geared up all the time. Ten minutes after a lunch stop, he was killed riding 100 feet behind me, by a driver that ran a stop sign. I am alive not due to what I wear but mostly through fate.

"I had to lay it down to avoid serious injury."Somebody else said this already, a bike stops the fastest when you keep it on the tires. The slower you hit something, the better off you will fare.
All my encounters with the ground have been in broad daylight.

"If its not broke yet, it can still be fixed"
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post #130 of 165 Old 11-23-2019, 02:09 PM
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FWIW 2/3s of riders will never have an accident on pavement. ( tip overs excepted ).
I'm one of that 2/3s with 55 years of riding....not even many close calls for anything serious tho a few self inflicted - riding on new years on icy roads led to a long slide on my back keeping the handlebars of the 305 Hawk off the road.

Similar with a 40 km ride during a blizzard ....slide out...pick up bike...repeat......I still think some of the riding was actually across a farmers field not the road but hey...I did make it even tho most major roads were closed.


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Canada 2018 CB500x >2009 CBF1000 sold 10 Wee ABS sold 09 Burgman Exec sold 10 NT700v sold
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