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General V-Strom Discussion Talk about all things V-Strom not limited to just one of the above models

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post #1 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 08:23 AM Thread Starter
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I'm not quite sure if this has been posted or discussed on our site. Interesting statistics from the Highwat Safety Department. I found it while researching helmet safety. Please check out the statistics, as they are interesting. What are your thoughts? It looks to me like these statistics are indicative of an aging, changing demographics in America. The numbers are food for thought.


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post #2 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by chirosyd View Post
I'm not quite sure if this has been posted or discussed on our site. Interesting statistics from the Highwat Safety Department. I found it while researching helmet safety. Please check out the statistics, as they are interesting. What are your thoughts? It looks to me like these statistics are indicative of an aging, changing demographics in America. The numbers are food for thought.


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Very interesting statistics. I'd would have been interested to see "years of experience", along with age, catagory.


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post #3 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 10:13 AM
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Very interesting statistics. I'd would have been interested to see "years of experience", along with age, catagory.
Good point. A lot of older folks with little to no experience are buying big cruisers & hitting the road without really knowing what they're doing.

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post #4 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:02 AM
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Interesting stats; I bookmarked them for later examination and reference. The age thing was curious; did it indicate that older people were getting into motorcycles, or does it indicate that the skill sets of older riders who've been riding a long time are starting to deteriorate? If it's the latter, it does give guys like me (pushing 50 and riding for 40 plus years) something to think about.

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post #5 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:06 AM
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A lot of the older rider crashes come from riders who took many years off and start riding again thinking they still have the knowledge, muscle memories and reflexes they used to have. They don't.

Pat- 2007 DL650A was ridden to all 48 contiguous states. I didn't quite make it to 17,000 miles on the 2012 DL650A.
Nicknames I use to lessen typing, Vee = 2002-2012 DL1000s. Vee2=2014-2016 DL1000s. Wee = 2004-2011 DL650s. Glee = 2012-2016 DL650s
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post #6 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:20 AM
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A lot of the older rider crashes come from riders who took many years off and start riding again thinking they still have the knowledge, muscle memories and reflexes they used to have. They don't.
I'd like to see a study that makes a distinction between those classes of riders (older long term riders and older new riders/older riders who've taken a long break from riding). Do the skill levels required to ride a motorcycle deteriorate faster with age than do those necessary to drive a car?

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post #7 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:40 AM
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More males in their twenties died than any other age grouping, including the senior set that often, like GW pointed out, includes returning riders and a good number of riders who drink. If you stay sober and take her easy, you have a decent chance of not being in this study.

What do you think about the numbers on larger cc engines affecting deaths?

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post #8 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:41 AM
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The displacement trend lines are interesting. The smaller bikes show a steady decrease for the entire time period, although maybe that's just a reflection of field population. Deaths on bikes with larger than 1400 cc has surged, again not normalized for population. Mileage ridden should also be significant, but again isn't measured.

The factors that are not a reflection of field population or miles ridden per year are (1) 25% of fatalities are unlicensed riders and (2) alcohol. Anyone can get trained/licensed and simply decide not to drink & ride. Easy risk mitigation.
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post #9 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:45 AM
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Skills don't deteriorate faster. The skills required are more complex and difficult to develop. Returning riders often don't do the necessary steps to rebuild their knowledge and muscle memory. I was away from riding for 16 years and had my only crash requiring medical treatment, or resulting in damage to the bike requiring an insurance claim, five months after returning to riding.

The best place I've found to go for safety statistics is Motorcycle Safety Site
If you don't find what you are looking for right away, join the group and go to the forum to ask. If anyone does that, post the user name you apply for there in this thread. It can take a while for new members to be approved if no moderators are on line.

Pat- 2007 DL650A was ridden to all 48 contiguous states. I didn't quite make it to 17,000 miles on the 2012 DL650A.
Nicknames I use to lessen typing, Vee = 2002-2012 DL1000s. Vee2=2014-2016 DL1000s. Wee = 2004-2011 DL650s. Glee = 2012-2016 DL650s
See https://www.stromtrooper.com/general...nicknames.html

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post #10 of 30 Old 09-13-2014, 11:57 AM
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Good point. A lot of older folks with little to no experience are buying big cruisers & hitting the road without really knowing what they're doing.
I think that is somewhat substantiated by the numbers. There is a rapid rise in fatalities by engine size over 1400cc that is significant. There is a decrease in fatality rates of sub 1000cc engine sized bikes.

There is also a corollary in the table " Fatally injured motorcycle drivers by age and motorcycle type, 2012 " Here it shows there is a high number of fatalities of the 50+ age group while riding Cruiser and Touring models. These are typically larger CC bikes.

That being said.. there is still a high number of fatalities in the Sub 30 age group while riding SuperSport bikes, 43% of these are the result of single vehicle accidents. This is a statistic that is lost on many of the younger riders. Single vehicle collisions account for almost half the fatalities to riders.

I see this very frequently, new riders of all ages on bikes too big for them to handle, with limited education, not enough experience and far too much confidence. When confidence exceeds experience occurs is when a problem is about to happen.

New riders fatigue quickly and do not have the stamina to ride for extended periods of time, dehydration and fatigue play a large role in the number of incidents and particularly fatalities later in the day. There is a high percentage of motorcycle collisions that occur between 3pm and 6pm and 6pm to 9pm. Late afternoon after a big lunch folks get sleepy, they get fatigued, they are dehydrated, judgement is impaired, reaction times are slower etc. This is a bad combination of issues.

Early evening, dusk is a bad time of day to ride, in addition to fatigue and dehydration, there are quality of light issues / visibility. Other vehicles are often on the road, people rushing home from work.. People rushing out for a good evening event.. Many animals come out at dusk, deer, hogs and other such hazards. Moisture starts collecting in the shaded corners at this time, road conditions change.

BAC.. A large number of the fatalities there was an elevated BAC level. Almost 20% were at a level above 0.15
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