2012+ 650 rear brake pad replacement - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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2012+ 650 rear brake pad replacement

GREETINGS -- these are my notes for my first rear caliper brake pad replacement.

supplies: new caliper brake pads, brakleen brake cleaner, silicone, permatex anti-seize lube; reuse existing brake pad insulators & retainers

according to service manual, no need to remove the caliper bracket to replace brake pads; however, caliper is often removed to clean with brakleen and lubricate with silicone.

brake cleaner is compatible with the caliper rubber parts. read brakleen instructions; protect non-caliper parts from spray & use newspaper or cardboard to catch excess. brakleen will evaporate

after removing pads or caliper, do not engage the brake or else a caliper rebuild may be required!

use permatex anti-seize lube on screw hole for the screw that protects the brake pad pin

loosen the brake pad mounting pin before loosening the 2 caliper mounting bolts

the rear brake insulator & retainers are reused, unless you buy an OEM kit; reuse or save the insulators & retainers

BEFORE pushing the brake piston back into position 1) clean the sides of the piston & inside of caliper with brakleen, 2) loosen the cap for the rear brake master cylinder, 3) push the piston back w/ a c-clamp or by reinstalling the old brake pads and then leveraging the piston into position w/a screw driver

THEN apply silicone to the sliding surface of the piston — the top edge of the piston; youtube shows application of silicone inside caliper at brake hose and bleeder valve connections; use silicone sparingly to prevent contaminating the brake pads

apply silicone to the brake pad mounting pin, mounting bolts & rubber boots, especially the rearmost bolt/boot — see the service manual illustration

apply silicone to the brake pad retainer surface that comes into contact with the piston (& also the outside surface of the brake pad on the other one).

apply silicone to the brake pad retainer/mounting clip at the lower-front part of the caliper

install brake pads on the caliper with the brake pad mounting pin. then install the caliper with the new pads into the teeth of the caliper mounting clip, then begin to connect the caliper forward-most mounting bolt & reach in from the chain side of the wheel to fully insert the brake pad into the mounting clip.

secure the rear mounting bolt, etc....and you are done.
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post #2 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 12:34 PM
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"BEFORE pushing the brake piston back into position 1) clean the sides of the piston & inside of caliper with brakleen, 2) loosen the cap for the rear brake master cylinder, 3) push the piston back w/ a c-clamp or by reinstalling the old brake pads and then leveraging the piston into position w/a screw driver"

I would change that step. If the rear master cylinder is full, and you loosen the cap, brake fluid will run down the outside of the master as you push the rear caliper piston back in its bore.
I suction the fluid from the master cylinder reservoir OR pinch off the line between the master cylinder and the caliper, then open the caliper bleeder and push the piston back in its bore. Some ABS systems dont take kindly to fluid being forced backwards through the system.
When replacing brake pads I always flush the old fluid out and replace with new. An air-powered brake bleeder tool makes this a 3-5 minute event. Be sure to return the reservoir cap seal to its fully retracted position.
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post #3 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JorgeLuis View Post
..... THEN apply silicone to the sliding surface of the piston — the top edge of the piston .....
Lube the bore of the caliper. That's where the sliding occurs. Realistically, you'll end up lubing both sufaces, but on the piston side it's the rings that do the sliding, not the piston. You wanna lube up in the bore to where the rings are.
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post #4 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 03:25 PM
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Since the bike is a 2012 it makes sense to flush out the old brake fluid, front and back brakes. Easy 1 man job, easier with a special speed bleeder nipple, forget the brand name.

Mark
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post #5 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 03:37 PM
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Since the bike is a 2012 it makes sense to flush out the old brake fluid, front and back brakes. Easy 1 man job, easier with a special speed bleeder nipple, forget the brand name.

Mark
Goodridge, SB7100 x 2 for the front and SB8125 for the rear. Easiest bleed ever.
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post #6 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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MAZ -- your response hit the nail on the head. actually, i did not loosen the cap of the rear brake master cylinder because i did not want to take off the side panel and because i saw lots of youtubes, including Lemmy at Revzilla, that skipped that step. i believe extra fluid got pushed up into the master cylinder and the fluid in the cylinder is now probably past the "full" level. i will check that tomorrow. what kind of problem can result from skipping that step? next time i will not skip that step.

after i completed the job, i adjusted the break pedal, not the break light, because the brake light would not go OFF. i went for 20 drive in the neighborhood. everything appeared to be fine, except for the VERY HOT REAR BRAKE ROTOR, whereas the front rotors were just warm. the rear wheel spins freely enough when it is up on the center stand. is it normal for rotors to get HOT?

BikeHigh -- to lube the bore of the brake caliper i would have to remove the piston! Yikes!

mpom & BikeHigh -- i will get up the courage to bleed the brakes (& flush the radiator) at the next 2 year interval. thanks for the tips.

OTHER STUFF -- instead of using blue locklite on the threads for the 2 bolts, the brake pad pin & the pin cover -- i carefully applied permatex anti-seize to the threads only. that way, i could snug things up tightly without worries. comments?

the oem rear brake always felt weak to me. i practically had to stand up and stomp on the pedal to get an ABS reaction. today, i adjusted the brake pedal so that it will travel further down before it fully engages. too soon to say, but i think I am getting a better feel & feedback from the rear brake. maybe the brakes feel better because i cleaned the rotors with brakeleen and installed new brake pads. not sure.

the rear brake replacement taught me how & where to use the brakeleen & silicone, especially after harsh road conditions/chemicals in the winter. after i finished up with the rear brakes today, i sprayed the front calipers & rotors, applied silicone to 2 pins on each of the front calipers, and also applied a bit of silicone to the rubber parts. the rubber boots on the front calipers look very flimsy. i will want to replace them when i do the front brakes.

there was still plenty of life left in the rear brakes. next time, i will wait longer before i change them out. the wear on the brake pads was not perfectly even front to back and side to side. there was a divot on the piston side pad, on the top edge near the pin. maybe a rock hit it there. the rotor smooth, but there is a visible line on the rotor that correlates with the divot.

is this a great sport or what? thanks for all your help stromtroopers.
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post #7 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 08:43 PM
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No, there is enough of a gap between the piston and the bore to get a narrow tool of your own making in there and spread/pack some silicone grease in there. Cut a bamboo skewer, a zip tie, whatever you can come up with, that is relatively stiff and won't scratch the bore.
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post #8 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 09:20 PM
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I agree with flushing/bleeding the brakes at every change of pads, or 2 yr intervals if pads last longer than that. Waiting longer than that could cause expensive damage to the system. It is a very easy job and fluid is inexpensive.

I don't want a pickle, I just want to ride my motorsickle. A. Guthrie.
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post #9 of 21 Old 11-25-2018, 09:27 PM
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Jorge, remember one thing...YouTube isnt working on YOUR bike, and isnt going to be the one to fix it.
It's possible to have enough fluid in the reservoir to apply pressure to the caliper if the conditions are right. There is a high and low level markings on the reservoir for a reason.
You dont adjust the brake pedal to change the on/off points of the switch. You can change the pedal height to better suit your ergonomics, but the brake light switch is adjustable all by itself.
My Suzuki service manual doesnt show blue loctite or antiseize to be used on the pad retaining pin bolt. But it does show torque specs for all pad and caliper mounting bolts. "Snug" doesnt cut it.
I flush and change my brake fluid every year regardless of mileage. The master cylinder and caliper(s) you save may be your own. Fluid is inexpensive, the labor time is minimal, and new fluid prolongs the life of other brake hydraulic components. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, that is, it attracts moisture, which is black death to a brake or hydraulic system.

When you change parts like brake pads in this case, you have to look at the job as though you are renewing a system. Anything you skip or miss can compromise the end result. This is akin to replacing your car's noisy water pump and not sending out the rust-filled radiator for cleaning. This is not meant to say to rebuild or replace every single component of your brake system, but attend to the expendables like brake fluid flushing and bleeding.
I wouldnt be afraid of bleeding, I'd be concerned that your brake fluid isnt all it should be.

Last edited by MAZ4ME; 11-25-2018 at 09:48 PM.
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post #10 of 21 Old 11-26-2018, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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BikeHigh -- thanks for explaining how to get lube down inside the piston bore to the piston ring.

locoblanco -- i will study up on the mechanics of bleeding/flushing the brakes. the shop charged me a great deal for that job and it is something that i should be able to handle without any trouble.

MAZ -- thanks for explaining the ins & outs of the brake pedal adjustment & the brake pedal light adjustment. i'm glad that the brake pedal light would not go OFF because it caused me to adjust the brake pedal which was set too high after i had lowered the pegs a couple of years ago. also, the brake light will now go OFF.

i will definitely check the fill level on the rear brake master cylinder and also tighten the bolts according to torque specs for pad and caliper mounting bolts. fyi, it appears the factory put a dab of loclite on these. plus, a couple of folks on the internet had trouble with these threads getting stripped &/or seizing. the hex head allen wrench caliper bolt was tricky for me to thread back in, but i was forewarned about that and proceeded very carefully -- to protect the rubber boot and to avoid stripping the threads.

since my last posting, i've learned that brake rotors get very hot. still, my rear rotor was much hotter than my front rotors. maybe that is because the new pads are getting broken-in. i saw a post from GW explaining that unlike auto brake pads, motobike break pads should be broken-in gently.

happy trails.
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