Can't get a good seal for brake fluid replacement - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
DL650A - 2012-2016 DL650A 2012-2016 (L2-L6)

 6Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 12:47 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
bajakirch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: America's Dairyland
Posts: 513
Can't get a good seal for brake fluid replacement

Over the weekend I worked on replacing my front brake fluid. A few years back I purchased a Harbor Freight vacuum pump to make this an easier job, but this is the first time I've used it on the Wee.

I had a heck of a time getting the pump tube to seal on the nipple. When I used the pump, it introduced air into the tube and decreased my pump efficiency. Also, it introduced the possibility of air getting into the brake system.

I should note that I'm fairly confident the bubbles I saw in the vacuum hose were not coming from the brake system -- I'm not experiencing any symptoms of air in the system before or after my project (spongy brake handle, etc.).

I tried a couple of different approaches to get it to seal, including:
- A small spring clamp, but the clamp was too long for the nipple.
- Holding pressure on it with my fingers, but it proved impossible to hold, pump, and fill without three hands.

I'm open to suggestions, as I plan to do the rear brake this weekend.

If it's a good day to wash the bike, it's a better day to ride the bike.
bajakirch is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 12:58 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
locoblanco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Arizona
Posts: 875
Garage
You can always just bleed the old fashioned way, pump the lever, bleed, pump, repeat. The calipers and master cylinder are close enough to each other for it to be a one person job, (unless you have really short arms).
V-Strom Ry 2 likes this.

I don't want a pickle, I just want to ride my motorsickle. A. Guthrie.
locoblanco is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 01:44 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
RCinNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,725
I think you'll have better success if you reverse bleed the brakes. Air wants to flow up, not down, so pushing the air bubbles back up towards the reservoir is a lot easier than trying to pull it down towards the caliper. All you need to reverse bleed them is a large syringe and some tubing.

I've tried the vacuum pump for bleeding brakes, and had the same issues. You can try putting a blob of grease around the junction between the vacuum tube and the bleeder, and that sometimes works to make a seal. It's also really messy. Given the choice between the vaccum pump and just using the brake lever, I'd go back to using the brake lever.

I bought a couple large syringes and tubing from Amazon in a kit, for about 14 bucks.

Here's a good video from Youtube on how to do it. There are a bunch of others on there also.


"No matter where you go, there you are."
RCinNC is offline  
 
post #4 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 02:44 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
jurgenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Hazelton, BC
Posts: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by bajakirch View Post
Over the weekend I worked on replacing my front brake fluid. A few years back I purchased a Harbor Freight vacuum pump to make this an easier job, but this is the first time I've used it on the Wee.

I had a heck of a time getting the pump tube to seal on the nipple. When I used the pump, it introduced air into the tube and decreased my pump efficiency. Also, it introduced the possibility of air getting into the brake system.

I should note that I'm fairly confident the bubbles I saw in the vacuum hose were not coming from the brake system -- I'm not experiencing any symptoms of air in the system before or after my project (spongy brake handle, etc.).

I tried a couple of different approaches to get it to seal, including:
- A small spring clamp, but the clamp was too long for the nipple.
- Holding pressure on it with my fingers, but it proved impossible to hold, pump, and fill without three hands.

I'm open to suggestions, as I plan to do the rear brake this weekend.
I have seen a cable tie used to help seal the hose around the nipple and that may work for you.

Brad
12 DL 650
00 KLR 650C
jurgenk is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 02:45 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Amsterdam
Posts: 418
When I bled my brakes the first time (using a manual kit, with a one-way valve) I saw a lot of bubbles in the clear plastic line from the bleed nipple. Had a hard time figuring out where it came from, and eventually concluded that this was outside air working its way through the threads on the bleed nipple, and then into the bleed nipple and into the clear hose of the bleed kit. The air was definitely not coming from inside the cylinder, and was also not getting back into the cylinder.

I have not tried, but I guess a dab of grease on the outside of the bleed nipple, where it meets the cylinder, should solve this issue. Me, I just stopped worrying and got perfect results anyway.
BackPacker is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 05:22 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pasadna area
Posts: 13,575
http://kirbysbrakebleeders.ecrater.com/

Easy simp and quickle. I kept putting off messing with it because I don't have 4 hands. For the 25-30 bucks for the speed bleeders, the job took 15-20 minutes with perfect results.
Bugzy and brutalguyracing like this.
notacop is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 07:32 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Rolex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Sydney's East
Posts: 2,885
I'm with BackPacker.

Some of the 19 rides in my shed
2014 V2, Snoopy
2009 Wee, Pumbaa the pig
WR450F, The Blue Postie Bike
YZ250N smoker with rego, Stinky.
Yamaha MT09 (FZ09), The Scud missile.
Club Lead not Club Med.
He with the most toys wins.
Out of my depth in a puddle.
Live life on the edge you will see more that way.
Ridding a motorcycle keeps things in balance.
At the end of each trail and at the end of each day history is made.
Rolex is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 08:42 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 1,670
This flat works:
https://www.tooltopia.com/private-br...ols-70852.aspx

After a few years of Mighty-Vacs, the mess, hand cramps, this tool does the job quickly and efficiently. You will need access to compressed air. Brake and clutch hydraulic system flushing and bleeding is a breeze.
MAZ4ME is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 09:56 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pasadna area
Posts: 13,575
Speed bleeders cost half as much. But I used a air driven tool decades ago. Worked like a charm. Only the device I used was pressurizing one, not a vacuum maker.
notacop is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 03-20-2018, 11:07 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 1,670
Notacop...good tools didnt cost me money, they made me money. And if they didnt make me money, they at least saved me time and effort with professional results.
notacop likes this.
MAZ4ME is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome