Valve adjustment - Page 3 - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
DL1000A - 2014-2016 DL1000A - 2014-2016 (L4-L6)

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post #21 of 85 Old 01-03-2019, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by HokiesRWee View Post
Wow! I'm doing the exact same work, myself, on my Wee. My second time for valve work (this bike and previous Wee). Will be first time for fork seals. I was beating myself up over having spent ~$100 on torque wrenches.


Have you tried cleaning the fork seals?

They usually don't fail unless really abused!
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post #22 of 85 Old 01-03-2019, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by steve85248 View Post
If it truly is $600 it may be worth it to have it done. I already own the shop manual and torque wrench but may need a few more tools if I attempt it myself. Taking the fairing and tank off is pretty simple too.
I recommend a quality set of feeler gauges, motorcycle specific is helpful for the shape, but normal will suffice. I also used a basic caliper, but that was just because I wanted to measure the shims coming out and going in...didn't necessarily trust their markings to be accurate. Also, one of those large magnetic tool retrieval gizmos on a stick was very helpful for removing the tappet and shim together without dropping either into places that are hard to get them out of.

You may want to get some assembly lube and silicone gasket glue. The assembly lube will help ease your mind if the bike will sit for very long after assembly (dry bearings and journals are most vulnerable to wear). Some recommended getting assembly lube without moly in it due to the wet clutch. However, the Suzuki assembly grease contains moly. I just used that ubiquitous red stuff... The silicone is for resealing the valve cover gasket. However, I was able to carefully remove and replace the valve covers several times without peeling off the glued portion (left it in the head). No oil leaks. YMMV.

Also recommends (?requires?) that you drain and remove the radiator for access to the front head. Good opportunity to replace the coolant. I also took the opportunity to check the spark plugs. They are overdue for change based on mileage interval, but look like new. (There has been much debate about the recommended replace interval for those plugs.)

I removed the base mount for the rear of the tank and coolant reservoir bottle and was able to remove the rear valve cover without additional disassembly.
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Last edited by Grimmer; 01-03-2019 at 03:37 PM.
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post #23 of 85 Old 01-03-2019, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Spec View Post
Have you tried cleaning the fork seals?

They usually don't fail unless really abused!
+1. I had some leaking inverted dirt bike forks. Tried to clean them out using 35mm film cut into a hook shape ... didn't work. I figured I would have to replace the seals. Bought an actual fork seal cleaning tool and tried again. Leak gone!
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post #24 of 85 Old 01-03-2019, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Spec View Post
Have you tried cleaning the fork seals?

They usually don't fail unless really abused!
No, I haven't, but I'm up for giving it a try. Have put the fork work off until I get the engine valve job done, and that's being delayed by a more pressing job of cutting and removing seven large forsythia bushes for my mom. Mom's well into the 80s (YO), and I decided to put priority on her work...

Forks very likely have original fluid (2012) in them. I watched some YouTube videos about fork work a few weeks ago, but have already forgotten what I saw. Anyway, if I have to remove forks to change the fluid, I might go ahead and replace both seals and associated bits.

Thanks for the link, and the interest.


2007 Wee. Blue. Bought at 5K miles. Sold at 32K+ miles. Gone but not forgotten.

2012 Wee2 Adventure. Black. Bought at 26K miles. Now 41K+. Love it! (but plan to own a 2014+ Vee, someday).
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post #25 of 85 Old 01-03-2019, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by HokiesRWee View Post
No, I haven't, but I'm up for giving it a try. Have put the fork work off until I get the engine valve job done, and that's being delayed by a more pressing job of cutting and removing seven large forsythia bushes for my mom. Mom's well into the 80s (YO), and I decided to put priority on her work...

Forks very likely have original fluid (2012) in them. I watched some YouTube videos about fork work a few weeks ago, but have already forgotten what I saw. Anyway, if I have to remove forks to change the fluid, I might go ahead and replace both seals and associated bits.

Thanks for the link, and the interest.

i just purchased the seal cleaner thing for about $22 due to a leaking seal on my bike
used it today and it removed tons of crap
so far so good......
i know some use the seal mate $7 or film or milk jugs, ect
good luck
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post #26 of 85 Old 01-04-2019, 04:33 AM Thread Starter
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You said if 99 of 100 are in speed doesn't mean you're will be is very true, but then it's a math problem. If 1 out of 100 valves need adjusting then paying about a grand to do a valve adjustment is a huge negative EV proposition. I liked your later response, but basically while bike is 12k, if everyone does valve adjustment it's 80k spend but only one bike needed it. It's worse than taking insurance in Black Jack.

More costly maintenance jobs, if your not doing then yourself are a simple math problem... Is (failure rate X cost) < (maintence cost). If it's close do it, but I'm at 17k miles and live in NYC. I can do simple items like oil, chain, and sprockets myself. I think the math says gamble on valves....
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post #27 of 85 Old 01-04-2019, 09:07 AM
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Valve adjustment

I did the valve check on my 2014 650 at 30,000 miles(first one) the intakes were in the middle of the range and the exhausts were at minimum. I was lucky to have a friend nearby to help with the shim change. My dealer wanted $750 for the job and I wonder if the exhaust valves being just inside the spec if they would have done a shim change or said they’re good and see you in 14,000 miles.


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Last edited by Highwayman2016; 01-04-2019 at 07:52 PM.
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post #28 of 85 Old 01-04-2019, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by dakor82 View Post
You said if 99 of 100 are in speed doesn't mean you're will be is very true, but then it's a math problem. If 1 out of 100 valves need adjusting then paying about a grand to do a valve adjustment is a huge negative EV proposition. I liked your later response, but basically while bike is 12k, if everyone does valve adjustment it's 80k spend but only one bike needed it. It's worse than taking insurance in Black Jack.

More costly maintenance jobs, if your not doing then yourself are a simple math problem... Is (failure rate X cost) < (maintence cost). If it's close do it, but I'm at 17k miles and live in NYC. I can do simple items like oil, chain, and sprockets myself. I think the math says gamble on valves....

I was told there would be no math

Lot of un-supported speculation on your part. Just check the valves it's routine maintenance. The motor is very reliable especially if the service intervals are met. Yea it will run even if neglected until it doesn't.

You should calculate the cost of getting a non-op bike out of the middle of nowhere.
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post #29 of 85 Old 01-04-2019, 11:07 AM
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Was wondering if anyone knows of a situation where the valves were left to get way out of spec and caused a problem. What would happen? Too tight, a burnt valve? Too loose, excessive noise? I wonder how conservative the manual specs are.

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post #30 of 85 Old 01-04-2019, 12:02 PM
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If 999 out of a thousand valves are in spec, that in no way means your valves are in spec. You want to gamble and not do the recommended maintenance, go right ahead, knock yourself out.
But you dont know what you dont know, and you can't know unless you check.
Realize that valve adjustment also affects valve timing, which affects engine vacuum. I find it interesting that owners will spend all kinds of $$$ on farkles, and items they think are upgrades like exhausts and power commanders, but wont do the basic maintenance which can have yield the most improvement. I have many, but one particular horror story concerned a rider in my club with an '08 CBR900rr that had a poor idle and a rough feel. He spend $$$$$ on all kinds of stuff over a 2 year period. I had him bring it over, measured exhaust header temperatures, ran a compression test, followed by a leakdown test and... The problem the whole time was intake valves way too tight.
Get the service info, get some tools, and if you think you are able, at least check your valve clearance. It's not rocket science or brain surgery.
For a feeler gauge set, this is what I use and recommend. They are perfect for those valves where a conventional feeler gause set is too wide--like, for example, Yamaha 5-valve heads. Inexpensive as well.
https://www.tooltopia.com/lang-tools-1610.aspx
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