Chain slack - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
DL1000A - 2014-2016 DL1000A - 2014-2016 (L4-L6)

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post #1 of 47 Old 06-24-2016, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
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Chain slack

I've read this forum's posts on chain slack... but wanted to check a couple of things.
See in the owners manual the measurement of 20-30mm.
Did you all just rough guess, or measure to the midway point in the lower run of the chain from front sprocket to rear to pick the point you'd measure at? or what?

In the near future, I'm going to truss the swingarm up and pull the center sprocket hub, swingarm axle and rear sprocket hub into a straight line so i can get a good measurement of too tight, tight and good.... and then i'll just make my measuring stick so i can get the tension fast...

but i need to know what the factory book is shooting for and at what point in the chain run.

also...it appears they want just plain drop from the swingarm as the measurement, correct? or are do they want it tight and we're measuring deviation up and down from where it naturally hangs?

EDIT: well, found this article
http://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,10965.0.html
and he says they are measuring deviation from lowest point to highest point... good to know.

Last edited by Carphunter; 06-24-2016 at 10:19 PM.
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post #2 of 47 Old 06-24-2016, 10:33 PM
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With the rear wheel on the ground, two fingers worth of slack on top of the swing arm will get you pretty much spot on. Since the chain gets tighter as the suspension compresses, set it maybe a touch looser to account for the longer travel. I've found that using the top of the swing arm as a reference is much easier than trying to measure sag.

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post #3 of 47 Old 06-24-2016, 10:39 PM Thread Starter
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i'll give that a try.

like i said... i like to see what the factory is going for... but once i can get the swingarm totally in line on all axles/bolts, you can really nail down a good tight and loose mark on a measuring stick.
Made adjusting the chain on my xr super easy.
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post #4 of 47 Old 06-24-2016, 10:51 PM
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Hi Everyone; Here is what the High Quality Chain Manufacturers recommend,

Set the slack on your chain at 1.5 inches minimum with a target of 1.75 inches at the middle of the lower run of chain between your two sprockets with your bike upright and no rider on it.

The inch or so in the manuals is not correct and will prematurely wear out your Chain and Sprockets. In addition, Chain that is too tight is also very hard on all the related internal parts of your bike as well.

With the slack set correctly you will not need to be continually adjusting your chain trying to maintain the tension,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
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post #5 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carphunter View Post
In the near future, I'm going to truss the swingarm up and pull the center sprocket hub, swingarm axle and rear sprocket hub into a straight line so i can get a good measurement of too tight, tight and good.... and then i'll just make my measuring stick so i can get the tension fast...
You're making it too complicated. Use a little finger to lightly lift the chain in the middle of the lower run, bike on the sidestand. You want 20 to 30 mm, or more as Layton describes.

Pinballer said, "the chain gets tighter as the suspension compresses," so you do not want the chain to get tight when you go over a bump and put a big stress on engine mechanical parts nor on the chain.
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post #6 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 12:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carphunter View Post
i'll give that a try.

like i said... i like to see what the factory is going for... but once i can get the swingarm totally in line on all axles/bolts, you can really nail down a good tight and loose mark on a measuring stick.
Made adjusting the chain on my xr super easy.
I agree with you. The chain is its tightest when countershaft, swingarm pivot and rear axle are aligned.
Chain slack is simply about making sure that when the chain is at its tightest point that there is still minimal (the least possible) amount of slack in the chain. Incidentally I have know people who having done the above have cut a triangle or peg out of timber which just takes out all of the slack from the chain when placed between the swingarm and the upper run of the chain. The important thing is to ensure that you never over tighten the chain as it would go tight under compression putting a huge load on the chain and the countershaft bearing.
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post #7 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 05:34 PM
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Get someone to sit on the bike and check and then adjust chain. Weight seems to make a difference.
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post #8 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 06:00 PM
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Inch and a half on center stand.

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post #9 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 06:12 PM
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However you check it, do the check a few times, turning the back wheel each time as the chain may have different tension at different points due to chain wear, imperfections in machining sprockets etc, so you need to adjust at the tightest point.
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post #10 of 47 Old 06-25-2016, 10:04 PM Thread Starter
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k, thread has devolved... we're all going over the common stuff

But I still have to inject... the comments about putting a person on the bike to have some weight on it while checking the chain... that's the quickie version of actually checking the slack when all axles/bolts are aligned.

The tightest the chain can ever be is when those are aligned. Putting more weight on the bike just tries to get it near that point.

So, summarizing, going from the book, it's measuring slop from center to center of movement at the halfway point between the sprockets. Go from there with your own tricks and methods
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