Back Tire Jello - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
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Back Tire Jello

I bought a 2004 V-Strom a couple weeks ago, put on new tires, changed oil etc. I'm not sure if this is normal or if I did something wrong, but when I'm riding, and I shake the back wheel at like, 30mph, it feels almost like the back tire is sliding around a little bit. Also it does it on the highway when I ride over a long groove in the road. I'm not sure if this is normal and I'm just over thinking it, or something else is wrong. I think my back breaks are slightly rubbing aswell. Another situation that happened was I was riding and slammed on my breaks, and it almost felt like the back wheel was sliding around a bit. At first I thought I locked up the breaks, but I don't think I did. Any ideas?
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post #2 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 11:21 AM
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Some things to check:
- Tire pressure
- Rear wheel alignment
- All wheel spacers accounted for and in the correct positions
- Wheel and sprocket carrier bearings in good condition
- Chain tensioned properly
- Axle nut torque - should be 55-60 ft-lb with anti-seize
- Brake disk and pads in good condition
- Caliper cleaned and wear areas greased (with actual brake grease)
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post #3 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 11:22 AM
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be careful, new tires are slippery!!
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post #4 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanStrom View Post
I bought a 2004 V-Strom a couple weeks ago, put on new tires, changed oil etc. I'm not sure if this is normal or if I did something wrong, but when I'm riding, and I shake the back wheel at like, 30mph, it feels almost like the back tire is sliding around a little bit. Also it does it on the highway when I ride over a long groove in the road. I'm not sure if this is normal and I'm just over thinking it, or something else is wrong. I think my back breaks are slightly rubbing aswell. Another situation that happened was I was riding and slammed on my breaks, and it almost felt like the back wheel was sliding around a bit. At first I thought I locked up the breaks, but I don't think I did. Any ideas?
It wouldn't hurt if you just go ahead and remove and reinstall the rear wheel. If this is new to you, maybe find a steady hand for on scene advice. Also you can find parts diagrams online, like at bikebandit.com, to help verify that all the spacers are in the right place or even there at all. Even if you are an old hand, it happens (so I'm told)

Like I said, it never hurts to trust your instincts. But it can if you don't.

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post #5 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by DonOhio45813 View Post
be careful, new tires are slippery!!
Interesting? Tire manufacturers have not used "release agent" on tire molds in decades. Wonder what makes them "slippery" now?

Tuesday I mounted up a new Anakee 3 on the rear of my R1200GS at 16,789 miles. I went to the store yesterday and by the time I got home I had put 11 miles on the new tire and there was only about 1/8" of chicken strip left on both side of the thread and I'm still around to tell the story
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post #6 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 08:54 PM
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Kneel beside the rear wheel, grab the top of the tire with one hand, and using the other hand to steady the bike shake the wheel/tyre back and forth to see if there is any movement. Then check the line on the tire (both sides) to ensure that the tire is correctly mounted on the rim. Check the air (38psi cold is a good starting point). Reassure yourself that you reassembled the wheel correctly.
Brakes do touch slightly most of the time. If you believe that yours might be binding grab the brake disc after a ride. If it is burning hot it is binding.
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post #7 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 09:17 PM
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I have also heard that it is possible to reinstall one of the wheel spacers (#8 ??) the wrong way.
Also, if the Rear Sprocket Drum falls out of the rear wheel of its own accord the Rear Hub rubber buffers (#6 x5) should be replaced. An often used budget fix is to cut rubber bands from an old tube to make those buffers a tight fit in the hub.
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post #8 of 23 Old 05-15-2019, 10:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerazziMx14 View Post
Interesting? Tire manufacturers have not used "release agent" on tire molds in decades. Wonder what makes them "slippery" now?

Tuesday I mounted up a new Anakee 3 on the rear of my R1200GS at 16,789 miles. I went to the store yesterday and by the time I got home I had put 11 miles on the new tire and there was only about 1/8" of chicken strip left on both side of the thread and I'm still around to tell the story
I worked at a Michelin/BFG truck tire plant. The molds are most definitely sprayed with a release agent. Maybe they stopped the practice for cycle tires? But I'm doubting it, and spreading misinformation could easily get someone hurt/killed.

EDIT:
From tire home sites:

metzler: For optimum performance, new tires should be ridden on cautiously for the first 60-120 miles. During this run-in period sudden acceleration, heavy braking, and hard cornering must be avoided.

shinko: Shinko recommends a run-in distance of approximately 100 miles. Before then, maximum power or hard cornering should not be applied to the tires. Proper run-in allows you to familiarize yourself with the feel of the new tires or tire combination, as well as allowing the tire mold release agent applied during the manufacturing process to be worn off.

Dunlop: When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.

Avon: When new motorcycle tyres are fitted for the road, they should not be subjected to maximum power until a reasonable ‘running in’ distance has been covered. 100 dry miles (160km) is the recommended minimum (discount any wet miles covered).

Last edited by DonOhio45813; 05-15-2019 at 10:50 PM.
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post #9 of 23 Old 05-16-2019, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonOhio45813 View Post
I worked at a Michelin/BFG truck tire plant. The molds are most definitely sprayed with a release agent. Maybe they stopped the practice for cycle tires? But I'm doubting it, and spreading misinformation could easily get someone hurt/killed.

EDIT:
From tire home sites:

metzler: For optimum performance, new tires should be ridden on cautiously for the first 60-120 miles. During this run-in period sudden acceleration, heavy braking, and hard cornering must be avoided.

shinko: Shinko recommends a run-in distance of approximately 100 miles. Before then, maximum power or hard cornering should not be applied to the tires. Proper run-in allows you to familiarize yourself with the feel of the new tires or tire combination, as well as allowing the tire mold release agent applied during the manufacturing process to be worn off.

Dunlop: When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.

Avon: When new motorcycle tyres are fitted for the road, they should not be subjected to maximum power until a reasonable ‘running in’ distance has been covered. 100 dry miles (160km) is the recommended minimum (discount any wet miles covered).

How is it I took brand-new tires and was above to lean them over almost the entries way without incident. The "run in" period talk is lawyer driven. If they posted it was okay to hit the track from mile one the first person who low sided would be suing.

I personally believe the "run in " verbiage is there 1st to protect the manufacturer and second to allow the rider to get used to the new tires and their profile. Going from old worn out flat spotted tires to new fresh and rounded tires the steer in is a lot more pronounced and this gives people a period of time to get used to the new "feel".


Also the comment about the tire should not see full power until broken in. What if you take 2 bikes with the same size wheels. One produces 120 HP the other 60HP. At 1/2 power on the 120 HP bike I am at full power of the 60HP bike. How does the tire know the difference?
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post #10 of 23 Old 05-16-2019, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerazziMx14 View Post
How is it I took brand-new tires and was above to lean them over almost the entries way without incident. The "run in" period talk is lawyer driven. If they posted it was okay to hit the track from mile one the first person who low sided would be suing.

I personally believe the "run in " verbiage is there 1st to protect the manufacturer and second to allow the rider to get used to the new tires and their profile. Going from old worn out flat spotted tires to new fresh and rounded tires the steer in is a lot more pronounced and this gives people a period of time to get used to the new "feel".
Recently there was a tire expert on Adventure Rider Radio. He stated that release agents are no longer used & the "different" feel of new tires is due to just whet you stated. Being used to old, flat centered, worn old tires now suddenly you have proper shaped tires & things feel weird.
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