Rebuild after broken chain and fire - Page 12 - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
DL1000 from 2002-2012 DL1000 from 2002-2012 (K2-L2)

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post #111 of 154 Old 08-12-2019, 03:01 PM
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Awesome. I would insist on cleaning off the carbon as long as I have everything apart. May have zero effect on performance, but it would bug me knowing it's in there.

Good news on the valves. I suppose you can do a clearance check when you have everything nearly back together.

While you're reassembling, the only thing I would add is to consider (if you haven't already) replacing all the coolant hoses & seals. Seeing as you're doing a full engine rebuild, might as well have fresh O-rings, hoses, thermostat, all of it. Not due to the mileage so much as the age of the rubber. It would suck to do all that work & then have an annoying, messy coolant leak.
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post #112 of 154 Old 08-12-2019, 03:35 PM Thread Starter
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For sure going to clean up that carbon! Good point on the coolant stuff. The oem hoses are pretty spendy, but I could probably use some auto-grade straight hose for the small pieces that come off the thermostat housing and cut to length...may save a few bucks. I'll have to buy a gasket kit for the motor anyway, and I *think* those o-rings come with the kit I found. Replace the thermostat for sure.

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post #113 of 154 Old 08-12-2019, 04:57 PM
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Actually, thermostat replacement is not mandatory. You can save another ~$25 by keeping the old thermostat. It might still be fine. Mine was, after 11 years and 45000-ish miles. The rubber is constantly wetted by coolant, so it tends not to degrade like the hoses do. You can test the thermostat by dropping it in a pot of boiling water to see if it opens. If it does, and then closes again as it cools sufficiently, it's OK to keep. Thermostat test procedure is described in more detail in the service manual.

The O-rings I was referring to are on the coolant nipples of the cylinder heads. Shown in the "Radiator Hose" diagram on most parts websites, part #9 here: https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/su.../radiator-hose

It is not impossible that these O-rings were included with an engine gasket kit, though.

You can try making your own coolant hoses, but I don't think you'll have much luck.

Generic radiator hose is too stiff to bend as needed, so it won't fit.

Flexible radiator hose does exist, but can't be cut to length (well, you can cut it, but then it won't be the right diameter for the fittings).

Making fully-custom hoses, using lengths of straight hose or aluminum pipe in combination with flexible elbows, will quickly exceed the cost of OEM hoses, & introduces opportunities for leaks due to the multiple joints.

Your most budget-friendly move, then, is to put the original hoses back on & hope for the best. You might be able to fix minor seeps with water pump RTV, like Permatex 22071.
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post #114 of 154 Old 08-14-2019, 01:25 AM
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Actually, thermostat replacement is not mandatory. You can save another ~$25 by keeping the old thermostat. It might still be fine. Mine was, after 11 years and 45000-ish miles. The rubber is constantly wetted by coolant, so it tends not to degrade like the hoses do. You can test the thermostat by dropping it in a pot of boiling water to see if it opens. If it does, and then closes again as it cools sufficiently, it's OK to keep. Thermostat test procedure is described in more detail in the service manual.

The O-rings I was referring to are on the coolant nipples of the cylinder heads. Shown in the "Radiator Hose" diagram on most parts websites, part #9 here: https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/su.../radiator-hose

It is not impossible that these O-rings were included with an engine gasket kit, though.

You can try making your own coolant hoses, but I don't think you'll have much luck.

Generic radiator hose is too stiff to bend as needed, so it won't fit.

Flexible radiator hose does exist, but can't be cut to length (well, you can cut it, but then it won't be the right diameter for the fittings).

Making fully-custom hoses, using lengths of straight hose or aluminum pipe in combination with flexible elbows, will quickly exceed the cost of OEM hoses, & introduces opportunities for leaks due to the multiple joints.

Your most budget-friendly move, then, is to put the original hoses back on & hope for the best. You might be able to fix minor seeps with water pump RTV, like Permatex 22071.
The thermostat hoses are different ID at each end. You need OEM. Do the O-rings for sure. Rad hoses can be replaced down the road without any tear down.
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post #115 of 154 Old 08-14-2019, 10:28 AM
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Good point, the T-stat hoses are weird like that. Something that would quickly become obvious, were one to try to substitute generic hose.

Speaking of radiator hoses, I've often wondered how those "high performance" AS3 hose sets compare with OEM hoses.

Here's an example:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SUZUKI-DL-1...0AAOSwY0lXSYVg

With shipping, you end up paying more than for OEM hoses. I don't know what the advantage of these hoses is supposed to be, maybe it's just the pretty and matching colors.

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post #116 of 154 Old 08-17-2019, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DesertBike View Post
Good point, the T-stat hoses are weird like that. Something that would quickly become obvious, were one to try to substitute generic hose.

Speaking of radiator hoses, I've often wondered how those "high performance" AS3 hose sets compare with OEM hoses...I don't know what the advantage of these hoses is supposed to be, maybe it's just the pretty and matching colors.
I've always heard they were "high heat" tolerant and wouldn't break down on the inside...not sure that's ever been proven. They sure are purddy, though!
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post #117 of 154 Old 08-17-2019, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
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Yep...I just broke my clutch basket :-(

Well kids, this is why you wait for your clutch removal tool to arrive, rather than trying to remove the clutch by sticking a screwdriver in there. :-(

I've watched @realshelby 's video on how to replace the clutch basket several times over the last couple years. If I had only read his FAQ! I would have known to wait for the tool, which is literally on the way from Amazon! But I hadn't read the FAQ. A 10mm wrench fit so nicely in there, and stopped the inner basket from moving, that I figured I'd at least give it a try. To be fair, I was thinking about my latest useless tool purchase. I spent $44 on that tool to loosen / tighten the special motor mount nuts, only to find that the things were finger tight, and that the inner one wasn't even necessary. So I kind of thought this might be the same type of deal and that I'd be returning that clutch tool without ever even opening it.

Boy, was I wrong. :-(

It only took about 12 lb/ft of pressure to snap that clutch basket. :-( So now, rather than spending zero dollars on replacing my clutch basket (I was planning to do it "sometime", but not THIS time...I don't think I ever even noticed any clutch chudder), I just cost myself $595, because now I don't even have a basket to send in to get the Werks done to it. Arrrrg!! Very frustrating.

But oddly, I'm more determined then ever now to get this bike back on the road, so I'm going to just keep plugging along. I still have to get that clutch out no matter what I do (to replace the output shaft, the "crux" of my issue), and I have plenty of other stuff to do while I'm waiting on the tool. As for the money I now need? Dunno. This morning I was $250 away from finishing (engine gasket set, antifreeze, a couple of tools), which right now is an almost impossible amount of money for me. Now I'm $845 away! But you know what? Instead of getting depressed about it (no more whining!!), I've decided to relax, and to believe that good things will continue to happen that will allow me to get this bike on the road! So I'm actually a little excited; I can't wait to see how this plays out! :-)

All is well at this point, except for discovering that my tarp doesn't hold antifreeze or oil, so now it's on my garage floor!
Found some nasty metal shards in here :-(
Good view with the pressure plate removed
And then this. *sigh*
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post #118 of 154 Old 08-17-2019, 08:28 PM
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I've always heard they were "high heat" tolerant and wouldn't break down on the inside...not sure that's ever been proven. They sure are purddy, though!
Meh, I'm not really convinced the fancy AS3 hoses are any more durable than OEM. Prettier, yes.

I never had a stock coolant hose break down inside. The problem was more than the material lost its elasticity, stretched out, and could no longer seal properly. Here's a photo from when I replaced one of the 2 large radiator hoses (not sure if this is inlet or outlet). Old (10+ year) hose on left, brand new hose on right:



I didn't think to measure the diameters at the time, but you can see that the old hose is bigger.

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post #119 of 154 Old 08-17-2019, 10:12 PM
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And then this. *sigh*
Bugga! Contact RealShelby for advice.
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post #120 of 154 Old 08-17-2019, 10:33 PM
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Just read the whole epic thread. Looks like a ton of work. On the plus side you will know every bit of the bike. Wondering though, since you can buy a dl1000 for about 2k - do you think it has been worth all the parts you have had to throw at the bike?
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