A Skill & a Habit to make you live..... - Page 5 - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Riding Proficiency Tips and suggestions for improving the rider's safety skills and riding techniques

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post #41 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06Strom View Post
Great post, but it only covers 2 of the 3 most important things.

The one left out is luck.

I like to weave about when uncertain about others to avoid the SMIDSY effect, and I do practice braking in the rain (even though I'm nowhere near MotoGP stopping ability) - this one is for free, but I have retro reflective tape all over my bike and wear a poke-out-your-eyes-yellow helmet - but the missing factor is really just good ol' luck.

As hard as I try, there's still multiple incidents I've missed by inches, and it wasn't because I was sleeping on the bike.

I've gone 150,000 miles or so in less than 10 years and have been lucky to do so.

I hope this isn't my last post about motorcycling.

You can practice your heart out, but even someone like Marco Simoncelli makes mistakes in the safest of motorcycle settings.

Ride safe.
If you feel luck is one of the most important factors really you are saying it doesn't matter what you do and there really isn't much more you can say.

Sure sometimes shit happens... A meteorite could land on me or a bridge could fall as I was riding under it but if I felt that I was constantly being lucky in my riding or am depending on luck and think it is an important factor I would take a hard look at how I was riding.

..Tom

2006 DL650: 202,000 km 125,500 miles,
2012 DL650 139,500+ km, 86,700+ miles. Sold
2015 DL1000 New July 2015 85,000+ km, 53,000+ miles.


This can help preventing from cars pulling out in front of you (SMIDSY)
SMIDSY detailed report.
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post #42 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 01:28 AM
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make your luck


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Australia> 04 KLR650 • 93 ST1100 sold • Canada >• 10 Wee ABS • 2009 CBF1000 • 09 Burgman Exec sold • 10 NT700v sold
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post #43 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 05:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06Strom View Post
Great post, but it only covers 2 of the 3 most important things.

The one left out is luck.

I like to weave about when uncertain about others to avoid the SMIDSY effect, and I do practice braking in the rain (even though I'm nowhere near MotoGP stopping ability) - this one is for free, but I have retro reflective tape all over my bike and wear a poke-out-your-eyes-yellow helmet - but the missing factor is really just good ol' luck.

As hard as I try, there's still multiple incidents I've missed by inches, and it wasn't because I was sleeping on the bike.

I've gone 150,000 miles or so in less than 10 years and have been lucky to do so.

I hope this isn't my last post about motorcycling.

You can practice your heart out, but even someone like Marco Simoncelli makes mistakes in the safest of motorcycle settings.

Ride safe.
Do you have headlight/brake modulators? They do wonders you know.

Speaking of luck the way I ride nowdays doesn't rely on luck I leave no chance for cagers.

Last edited by cyclopathic; 08-29-2016 at 05:36 AM.
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post #44 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 07:44 AM
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Marco's mistakes are based on riding the bike to 10/10ths in a controlled environment with known hazards.
Does not relate to road riding at all.
The more you practice and the more you think about how and why you do things, the better your luck will be.
Maintaining your bike in a roadworthy condition is the first stage of improving your luck, there are quite a few stages after that one also.
There is indeed blind chance but everything else we can prepare for.
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post #45 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Macdoc View Post
make your luck

"I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it." Widely (but probably incorrectly) attributed to Thomas Jefferson. Timeless advice no matter who wrote it.


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post #46 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 07:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeeBee View Post
OP - just a suggestion but if you'd break up your Wall of Text with some Paragraphs, it'd sure make it nicer to try to read...
Excellent suggestion! Done! When I first copied and pasted the article in, it appeared to carry the paragraph breaks but then I forgot to review it for that....but it's done now with almost 1200 people having view this very important discussion, I thank you for the suggestion.

Some have mentioned other skills and I will not disagree that they carry importance but the goal of this write up was to focus on two things I find, are thee most important things that have helped keep me from being involved in any accidents with cars, ever.

We would all welcome anyone writing a separate article to focus in on what skill they desire to impart to us or maybe it's something that they have a desire to learn? I think that having separate, focused articles would benefit riders of every skill level if they were all in this folder so maybe a rider wanting to know more about the importance of braking or weaving may read this one, another revolving around counter-steering would attract riders looking to learn more about that subject.

Either way, I'm thrilled by the enthusiasm generated and also that so many other riders "weave" because I KNOW that little habit is saving lives! I also am happy that these words have made some others go out and start practicing because in the end, it's a skill that will very possibly, save your life!

I intentionally stayed away from one aspect of braking because it usually generates two schools of thought. That is the habit of riding with two fingers(on my vintage bikes it's 3) on the front brake lever at all times. Myself, I'm not a "new" rider and I'm also very practiced in applying my brakes on my Vee and FOR ME, it eliminates possibly 3 -10th of a second or so.....the time it takes to recognize the need, move your fingers to the lever and then apply pressure.....all that is eliminated by having those fingers in place so for me...it's recognize, squeeze.

I have tried to find the real difference by practicing both methods (fingers on grip v fingers on lever) in the empty parking lot to see what that savings translates to linear feet of stopping distance but I found that I'm unable to be "objective" when trying to compare the two methods. I always find myself cheating on how fast I move or find that I'm beginning the move too early....it's just very hard to make myself be completely objective.


In my mind, there just HAS to be some times savings so that how I ride. I am curious as to how you guys feel about that or what your habits are?

jeff

Present only:
My VStrom 1000 K7
Stock bikes: a
purple '74 RD350 in great shape,
'72 H1,
1975 GT550,
All-original 1975 H2 750 triple (purple of course),
Modified bikes:
1974 H2 750(my go-fast), a scary fast & fully ported street machine!
'82 Yam 650 Turbo- running 18PSI, Be sure to be pointed where you want to go!
'75 GT550 built up & ported,
'75- H1 wrist-rocket- HOLY GOD ALMIGHTY!
'75 S1 Kaw 250 baby triple w/ lifted and ported 350cc cylinders/28mm flatslides
To-Restore list: '72 H1, 1-'75 H1, 1974 GT750
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post #47 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 08:34 AM
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Jeff at 60 mph, we are traveling 88 feet per second or close to 4 car lengths. Covering the brake and clutch can and will save you about half that distance which is a huge safety factor. I admit I don't always cover when I do not perceive a threat. Even though I should it is not a comfortable hand position to be in all the time(carpal tunnel surgeries on both wrists). But, as soon as I see any potential danger ahead, my fingers go over the brake and clutch levers. Shorty levers also make this easier to do.

To test the stopping distance difference, place a cone or other object on the parking lot. Make sure your run is long enough to reach target speed and maintain it. Using peripheral vision, engage your brakes at the cone. If you make several passes and measure an average stopping distance you will have a pretty good idea of the difference between covered and not covered.

I have a case of small orange cones. I can stick half a dozen of them in my tank bag. At each stopping point, I drop one on the ground where the front tire came to rest, then pull up and scoot it out of the path. The cones make measuring easy, and they also give me a goal to try and beat on the next brake run.

Cones:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/92-Traffic-S...QAAMXQuTNTMhpG

'15 DL650XT
"You do your own thing in your own time"

Last edited by Motor7; 08-29-2016 at 08:37 AM.
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post #48 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by MBZuki View Post
Like NVDucati said I would like to start riding in the dirt more. Lots of good skills to come out of imo.
I started riding dirt about six years ago and it helped make me a much better street rider. Lots of riders mention balance, braking, throttle control, etc as benefits of dirt riding, but for me, I think addressing target fixation was one of my most significant improvements from dirt riding. Look, point, shoot.

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post #49 of 51 Old 08-29-2016, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06Strom View Post
Great post, but it only covers 2 of the 3 most important things.

The one left out is luck.

I like to weave about when uncertain about others to avoid the SMIDSY effect, and I do practice braking in the rain (even though I'm nowhere near MotoGP stopping ability) - this one is for free, but I have retro reflective tape all over my bike and wear a poke-out-your-eyes-yellow helmet - but the missing factor is really just good ol' luck.

As hard as I try, there's still multiple incidents I've missed by inches, and it wasn't because I was sleeping on the bike.

I've gone 150,000 miles or so in less than 10 years and have been lucky to do so.

I hope this isn't my last post about motorcycling.

You can practice your heart out, but even someone like Marco Simoncelli makes mistakes in the safest of motorcycle settings.

Ride safe.
06Strom, to recap you ride a lot of miles / you practice stopping in the rain / you weave and wear high vis gear. I'm willing to assume that you keep your bike in good shape as well.

When you say "As hard as I try, there's still multiple incidents I've missed by inches, ..." I think you maybe selling yourself and your efforts a little short.

You likely have heard the old saying; “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” Well like most things motorcycling, is a game of inches, huh.

I think what you are describing is that we all need an absence of bad luck.

If anyone cares, that old saying is really old. Attribution goes to Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca) (ca. 4 BC – 65 AD) was a Roman Stoic philosopher.

Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '02 BMW K1200rs, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT
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post #50 of 51 Old 08-31-2016, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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"So being at 2am on Pennsylvania turnpike with construction in heavy downpour on"

Funny that you mentioned this Cyclopathic!

True story: As many of you guys that have been around here know, I collect and restore vintage bikes. Because of my interests, I used to ride out to AMA Vintage Days in Lexington Ohio every year(I still go but I drive out with my GF now). It's a very fun three day event with 20-25 thousand other guys and gals like me. I've been riding out since I got my Vee on '07. It's only about 450 miles each way so it's nice ride without being too long. When I travel on the open road, I like riding at night. I find it easier to deal with trucks and critters then Suzi putting on her make-up or Todd texting Suzi...you get the idea. I would typically pack the bike up a day early then go to work Thursday, come home and go to sleep, get up around midnight and have a cup of coffee to make sure I'm fully awake before I leave my home. That puts me at the event around 10 or 11 Friday morning which is perfect. One year, might have been '11, it was raining hard when I went to bed and was still pouring when I woke up at midnight. I went back to bed and thankfully, the rain had ended when I finally left at 3AM.

Well, about 70 miles from my house, before I even hit Breezewood PA, I ran into that rainstorm. Instead of moving East and most storms here do, it had moved NW! I have a really nice rainsuit but I did that stretch of the PA turnpike from Breezewood to Pittsburg, through that long construction zone, with those trucks rolling at 85mph(ZERO exaggeration about that) and was very thankful to make it in one piece. When you run with trucks on those roads, you MUST keep up or you get into real danger of being hit from behind. In hindsight, I could have simply waited it out at the diner in Breezewood but it was one heck of an adventure....that's what we call it once we made it through something dangerous, "an adventure" but I know one thing, I wouldn't have been able to fart if I had eaten 6 can of beans.....LOL

That's one ride I won't ever forget, nor repeat! Two days later when I returned, it was 97 degrees when I left Ohio in full leather jacket, gloves and boots. The jacket is perforated but very heavy. I was stopping to dump bottled water on my head every hundred miles or so to stay cool and I remember thinking to myself, it wasn't hot on the trip out<LOL>! After that trip I bought a silver helmet to replace the black one...black is just too hot in the summer.

Stay safe guys,

jeff
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Present only:
My VStrom 1000 K7
Stock bikes: a
purple '74 RD350 in great shape,
'72 H1,
1975 GT550,
All-original 1975 H2 750 triple (purple of course),
Modified bikes:
1974 H2 750(my go-fast), a scary fast & fully ported street machine!
'82 Yam 650 Turbo- running 18PSI, Be sure to be pointed where you want to go!
'75 GT550 built up & ported,
'75- H1 wrist-rocket- HOLY GOD ALMIGHTY!
'75 S1 Kaw 250 baby triple w/ lifted and ported 350cc cylinders/28mm flatslides
To-Restore list: '72 H1, 1-'75 H1, 1974 GT750
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