Palm Trees to Tundra- 2009 - Page 5 - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
Ride Reports (Route Sheets) The place to share your motorcycling adventures.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #41 of 73 Old 04-10-2010, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
July 23, 2009
Miles 8813-9083


I woke at 7AM and had a leisurely pack up while Jim slept in. We left Wobasso campground to drive the few miles back north to Jasper for breakfast at the Soft Rock Café. It was highly recommended for its fresh bakery goods and atmosphere. It had a French restaurant feel with a decided European flavor. The young lady who waited on us had a French accent. We had great food as we listened to soft rock tunes from the 70’s over the sound system. Jim and I remarked how ageless music from the 70’s was even though it was twice as old as the lady waiting on our table.

We headed south again on Highway 93 to check out Horseshoe Lake. It had been recommended to us to check out this U shaped alpine lake with steep rock cliffs. We were told it was a favorite place for the adventurous to jump or dive off the 85 foot cliff into the crystal clear water. We arrived at the parking area and hiked a short distance to the cliff. The spot is on the arm of the U nearest to the highway. It was way too high for me to even think about jumping unless a bear was behind me. I tossed a flat rock off the cliff. After it hit the water you could follow its path deep into the water for over 10 seconds as it slowly floated like a leaf into the cold clear alpine lake. It must have traveled over 30 feet underwater before it disappeared from view. I watched the ripples spread outward on the calm surface for hundreds of yards across the still lake.





Not long afterward a group of young people appeared. The 3 men in the group were intent on going off the cliff while their girlfriends snapped photos.

Our next stop was Athabasca Falls. This was an area where the river suddenly narrowed from over 100 yards wide to 50 feet and plummeted over a 100 foot drop.The roar of the water with the cool mist rising into the air was very relaxing and refreshing for a hot day.





We drove past so many beautiful mountain scenes and valleys. We saw the ice fields and drove to Lake Louise. It was a crowded tourist trap that is best avoided. It is odd how all the photos of Lake Louise make it look like an isolated and primitive lake. In reality thousands of tourists are standing behind you at the resort looking out at the same tranquil lake scene you are viewing.



The ride out of the Banff area was maddening. Traffic and road construction made the ride most unpleasant. Banff is very close to the large city of Calgary so many folks make their way to see Lake Louise. The tour buses are everywhere. Also if you are traveling through this area remember that north of the city of Red Deer, Alberta the hockey team fan base is the Edmonton Oilers. South of Red Deer it is the Calgary Flames. It is best to not ask someone from the area around Red Deer if the are a “flamer” which apparently means something much different than being a Flames fan.

We take the scenic part of Highway 93 toward Radium Hot Springs. When I spot the sign for the hot springs I know we have got to try it out. This will allow us to take our twice weekly bath and soak in a thermal spring. We check into the spa and get our towels. After a hot shower we head to the outdoor hot springs which looks like a large community swimming pool. Before we can get into the water a thunderstorm passes over and we have to wait out the local lightning. After 15 minutes we get into the pool. It was very relaxing after the tense ride out of Banff. Jim and I put on our boots after showering. We are sitting in the outer hallway where everyone leaves their footwear before going into the shower area so they can keep dirt and mud out of the showers. I can smell Jim's boots as I exit the shower area. I have to move 25 feet away from him to keep from puking. I notice people walking past and give a grimace when the pungent odor assails them.

We stopped for dinner in town and then head south on Highway 95 but the sky was getting ugly with storm clouds so we find a spot to camp for the night. We set up camp minutes before the sky opened up. It was a relaxing night in the warm, dry tent listening to the rain fall. Jim’s rear tire is now showing serious signs of wear and we will have to replace it soon.

2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

Last edited by docsabre; 04-11-2010 at 01:10 PM.
docsabre is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #42 of 73 Old 04-10-2010, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
July 24, 2009
Miles 9083-9559


We woke in the morning to a bright and sunny day. On the road south we passed over 150 bicyclists. Soon the sunny skies began to turn dark and menacing but so far the sky held. There was no rain. As we are traveling through Cranbrook, B.C. I spot a motorcycle shop, All Seasons Motor Sports. I whip into the lot and Jim follows. We go inside to inquire about rear tires. They have one in stock at a reasonable cost so Jim purchased it for later. He strapped it on his bike and we are on the road again. Just before we reached the US border the sun returned with a vengeance. It was very hot as we waited our turn at Customs. We paddled our bikes up a few feet at a time. We took the down time to clean all the dead bugs off our visors and windshields.

We cleared Customs and drove into Bonner's Ferry to get home baked cinnamon buns, cherry fried pies and coffee at a local bakery run by Mennonites. We bought a loaf of garlic cheese bread for later. We road on through beautiful scenery of farms and wheat fields from Bonner's Ferry to Moscow, Idaho. The wheat color was sometimes dark green or a shade of blue. There were fields of cattle and horses too.



We stopped in Moscow for an evening Mexican meal at La Casa de Lopez for average Mexican food. We spoke to some San Diegans while we enjoyed an Alaska Amber beer on the outside patio. The ride from Moscow to Lewiston, Idaho was very nice. There were lots of hills, sweepers and scenery to take in. The road took us to a plateau overlooking Lewiston. What a view! The ride off the plateau was a very fast 8% downhill with runaway truck ramps every quarter mile or so.

Lewiston was a large city that we rode through to get over the Snake River and picked up highway 129. The ride back out of the river valley was superb. When we reached the top of the plateau there were small rustic farms everywhere. There were more wheat fields and enormous silos everywhere.

The ride off this plateau into Oregon was absolutely the finest stretch of twisties we found on the entire trtip. We went over the Ronde River and then back up the opposite side into more twisties. Awesome! The sides of the road dropped off very steeply. A mistake here would be very painful. You could see areas on the hills where the soil and plants slid away during rainstorms. There was a sharp right hander with a rock cliff straight ahead. I glanced about 30 feet up the cliff as I approached the turn and saw a small white cross planted. I figure someone had missed the turn and slammed into the wall. Did they hit 30 feet up?



WE reached Enterprise and bought gas and stuff for breakfast. We were looking for free camping in the national forests. We traveled toward Joseph, a type of trendy town with fancy restaurants and antique shops and way too much wrought iron that I like to avoid. Caldera’s restaurant web site lists itself as “casually decadent dining”. No thanks. I like casual dining by my bike on a deserted dirt path in a national forest.

As the sun was setting we turned south on highway 39 to the Wallowa Mountain Loop road to find the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. After driving 5 miles into the forest I saw a likely dirt road shooting off to the left that looked inviting. There was a road sign stating, “Rough road. Not recommended for passenger cars”. Perfect! We would not get much traffic up there. We rode on for over 4 miles. The road offered no areas to pull over for camping as the sides dropped off steeply. Then it leveled off in a forested area that was just right. It looked west over the valley from where we had just ascended and was covered in soft grass. We set up camp and had our evening wine before turning in.




2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
docsabre is offline  
post #43 of 73 Old 04-10-2010, 02:07 PM
Stromthusiast!
Junior Trooper
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hillsboro, Texas
Posts: 6
Excellent report, really like your style of writing it, and your comments about Captain Kill Switch are so funny. Looking forward to the rest.

Former rides: Dirt-Kawasaki KD125, Zuk RM 250, Yam YZ400. Street-'79 Kawasaki KZ750 Twin, '00 Kawi Concours, '01 ST1100.
JohnC is offline  
 
post #44 of 73 Old 04-10-2010, 05:57 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
Twistn'roads's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Cambridge, Ont., Canada
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by docsabre View Post
Thank you very much. I hope you were not offended by my comments about getting through Canadian customs.

No worries Doc ,

Border crossings and customs, both ways, can be an adventure at times eh.......

Good show!

~TR~
Twistn'roads is offline  
post #45 of 73 Old 04-10-2010, 08:31 PM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
July 25, 2009
Miles 9559-9973



We slept in. The sun was baking me alive in my tent. I had to pack up in my shorts due to the early morning heat. We ate nut bars and drank Frapuccinos for breakfast. We ride the dirt road back down to Forest Road 39 and head south for 58 freaking twisty miles of motorcycle bliss. We stop on the road where there is a bridge over a stream so we can rinse out our dirty socks and shorts. We have brought the quick dry man made fiber shirts that dry in minutes. The socks and shorts we stuff in a mesh bag and hang off the bike. They will dry in a very short while while riding. We make it to Halfway, Oregon and stop for a muffin and some more coffee at a local general store. I arrange my damp clothes over the handle bars and seat to get dry while we write more post cards.

Highway 86 from Halfway to Baker, Oregon was very sweet. It was all curves with an equal mix of sweepers and twisties. The road out of Baker was also fine. Highway 7 is a well maintained road passing through some nice mountain scenery. The thermometer was touching 95 degrees. We reach John Day in time for lunch and a cold beer at the local saloon. Inside were 5 couples all on Harley’s. Their bikes were parked outside the saloon. It was amazing to note that each one of the ten riders were wearing some iteration of a Harley tee shirt. I have discovered that to be a true Harley rider you are required to wear minimal protective gear and always wear a Harley tee shirt. The shirt usually has the name of a Harley dealer located in some far away state to prove that you are one of the faithful who made a pilgrimage to one of the holy sites. If the state you are traveling in has no helmet law, you are required to ditch your lid. If the state has a helmet law you are required to wear a lid that makes your head look as small as possible, making people think you either have no helmet on or you have a freakish pin-head. It truly is a universal phenomenon.

The ride from Mitchell to the ultra-trendy and Birkenstock wearing, leftist town of Bend is hot and boring. Towns like Bend and Sisters, Oregon or Mendocino, California or Taos, New Mexico make my skin crawl for some reason. Any time I see a town that is full of candle shops, yoga instructors, new age book stores, organic coffee shops, antique stores, and over-priced restaurants I want to get out of there as fast as I can, usually after I take a big dump.

We head for Elk Lake Lodge on Highway 46 in the Williamette National Forest. We eat and listen to a local singer. We have a few beers and toward dark we try to find a place to camp for free. All the likely spots are in sandy soil with hordes of large ants all over the place. We are going way too fast on the dirt roads looking for spots when a large buck runs across my path. Too close. Slow down.

We find Craine Prairie Resevoir and camp for the night.

2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
docsabre is offline  
post #46 of 73 Old 04-11-2010, 03:06 AM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
July 26, 2009
Miles 9973-10,500



We wake at 6AM and leave in a hurry. We stop for a decent all American breakfast in La Pine on highway 97 north of the turn off for Crater Lake. We blast into Crater Lake area and see all we want to see in about an hour. I have traveled around Crater Lake 2 or 3 times and have no desire to take the long way around. We go to the south end of the lake to the gift shop area and snap some photos. We note a BMW rider from Virginia and talk to him. He had been on a ride from Virginia to Washington and now is visiting Crater Lake. I have a mental picture of the map of the US and think, “wow, this guy has traveled some miles!” Then I remember that it is only about 2500-3000 miles from here to Virginia. I then put it all in perspective with our 10,000 mile trip.



We raced out highway 62 to Medford. The tall pines along this road always amaze me. It is becoming hot again. I lose Jim in Medford when we gas up. I ride to highway 96 in California, the Bigfoot Highway. It is one of my favorite rides in California but the heat today is taking its toll. I think that Jim is behind me so I stop for snacks and a snooze along the road. After an hour Jim does not ride past so I figure he is probably ahead of me. I ride on in misery in 100 degree heat. The twisties are no fun in this heat. The tar snakes are out to bite my Vstrom. I have to stop for fluids many times along the way.



I finally make it to Willow Creek for dinner. I eat at the Cinnabar Café. It had decent burgers, fries and beer. The impressive artistic work in Willow Creek that you must see is the 100 yard long mural on the local Ace Hardware store wall depicting the history of Bigfoot in California. Apparently there is much history that school kids do not get about the roll that Bigfoot (Sasquatch) played in the settling of California. I took photos to document this interpretation. In the photos you will see Sasquatch showing the local Indians how to plant and harvest crops, showing the miners how to find gold, and other amazing feats. I am sure he is still at work in California showing the legislature how to balance the budget. He has also been very helpful with Arnold in helping him craft his gubernatorial policies. Amazing.







I get a cell call from Jim. He is 120 miles south of me near Leggett, California. He had problems with a bolt on his shifter peg. We agreed to meet at the campground outside of Leggett. I raced towards Eureka as the temperature dropped from 100 degrees to 55 degrees with fog the closer to the coast I got. It was fully dark when I reached the campground and set up my tent.

I took a hot shower and while writing in my journal, laughed at the puny size of the mosquitoes in California compared to Alaska. They were at least 1/3 the size of Alaska mosquitoes.

2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
docsabre is offline  
post #47 of 73 Old 04-12-2010, 04:12 AM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
July 27, 2009
Miles 10,500-10,696



We wake early and leave the camp ground to go across the highway to eat a breakfast burrito at Rip’s Café. It is a combination of café, souvenir shop, head shop and small venue for live music on weekends. We talk to some local boys who have a brindle colored lab/pit bull mix with an overactive bladder. The yellow and black stripes on his fur is the reason they call him Tiger. We ask about someone in the area to change Jim’s rear tire. They recommend a dude named J.P. at a custom bike shop in Fort Bragg on the coast.

We head out of the parking lot just as a tour bus stops at Rip’s for souvenirs and food. Some of the tourists admire our bikes and ask about all the Alaska and Canadian stickers. We proudly tell them we had just returned from a ride to Prudhoe Bay and places north.

The ride on Highway 1 from Leggett to Fort Bragg is without a doubt the best combination of winding motorcycle roads and scenery to be found anywhere in America. There may be better twisties (doubtful) or possibly more beautiful scenic rides, but not the combination. The road is over 45 miles of linked chicanes, hairpin turns, and undulating hills that go through the coastal redwoods and end on the Pacific Coast in wide sweepers with wide expansive views of the ocean and cliffs abutting the beaches. Hawks, buzzards and ravens soar overhead as you ride through patches of fog rolling in off the cold ocean water. The road in the redwoods blocks out the sunlight with a canopy so heavy you think you are riding in a tunnel that can sometimes stretch over 200-300 yards long. I have ridden all over mountain roads in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Tennessee, Georgia and North Carolina. Yes, I have even ridden the Dragon in western North Carolina. This part of Highway 1 beats them all for tight turns and beauty, plus you do not have the crowds of riders found on the Dragon- all the knuckle-head motorcycle racer wannabees who clog up the road with their poor skills. The only obstruction you will find here is the occasional logging truck chugging up the mountain. They are easily passed on a motorcycle.










We arrive in Fort Bragg but J.P.’s bike shop was closed. We found an independent motorcycle shop specializing in dirt bikes and ATVs. We asked Jason, the owner of Street, Track and Trail if he could change Jim’s tire. He worked like a dog using tire irons, not a pneumatic tire changing machine, trying to make a recalcitrant tire go on his rim. Finally he got it fitted. He also checked the bolts holding our shifter pegs on so we would not have it fall apart like Jim’s had the evening before. We had to force hi mto take money to change the tire! We told him to take his wife out to dinner tonight for his troubles. What a guy.

We gassed up in Fort Bragg as we knew the fuel would be about a dollar per gallon cheaper here than 10 miles down the road at the über-trendy coastal town of Mendocino. I always like to stop at Mendocino to see what all the hippies are doing who escaped from the sixties. It is a fun place to take in the zoo and poke fun at people who take themselves way too seriously.

We stop at Moody’s Organic Coffee Bar. It sells fair trade, organically grown coffee that is certified to be bird friendly, and grown only in third world countries full of peasants who hate Americans. I grab a blueberry muffin and head outside to watch the show.

There are two young people on the side walk who are playing music for the tourists while they enjoy their beverages and muffins. I sit on my bike and write in my journal while Jim wanders around town. The two young people appear to be either two girls or a girl and an effeminate young man who are playing a guitar and violin. The violin case is open for “donations”. They are on their bicycles and are traveling up from the Bay area. The kindhearted tourists leave a modest amount of bills in the violin case. When they are finished playing and scooping up the cash, I casually remind the musicians to be sure to report their tips for “tax purposes” because it was the “American thing to do”. The violinist with ambiguous sexual features said, “yeah, so I can finally get my health care.”

A flood of smart ass comments came to mind but I just grinned like the Cheshire cat with that all knowing look. Actually some of my thoughts were quite good but I did not feel like body slamming the poor thing. Perhaps he/she really did have medical problems or perhaps his/her sex change had to be postponed due to lack of money and these street concerts were the only way he/she could raise money until actual tax payers would be forced to pay for his/her operation. At any rate, I imagined he/she had been raised in a millionaire family’s home in Marin County while daddy paid for him/her to take private violin lessons and go to immensely expensive private schools after which he/she would eventually leave home in search of meaning in his/her life while living the brutal existence of a poor artist who left daddy’s millions behind to pursue his/her dream.
I am glad I live in a country where hard working people will pay for this person's health care and other social services so he/she can continue to live the carefree life of a hippie at their expense.

The endless parade of tourists and freaks begins to tire me and we must put miles on the bikes. We leave Mendocino behind in the sixties and travel back to the present. After 120 more miles of tight coastal turns and curves south of Mendocino, I am ready to call it a day. We are trying to make the US Coast Guard Training Facility near Petaluma in time for evening chow. The facility trains several enlisted ratings in the USCG, but most importantly they train messmen and women (cooks). They have a first class dinning facility on base. I stop there every time I roll though the area and have always got a fine meal for less than $4. I am able to get on military bases since I am a Navy reservist and have a base decal on my bike. Every time Jim comes this way with me he fails to get on base for some reason. Once, the guard would not let him in because he did not have a motorcycle endorsement on his driver’s license. If he had been stopped by CHP he would have had his bike towed and impounded. This time he did not have his proof of insurance. I left him at the front gate to get dinner as they would stop serving in a few minutes. He found a current copy of his insurance and joined me 15 minutes later.


After dinner we decided to camp at the campground on base. It is a wide open field on the end of the base. We were there with only a few other campers. We struck up a conversation with a mom who was pulling a large travel trailer from Georgia to California with her 4 boys. Her husband was a Navy reservist and she would pull the trailer with the boys to California to escape the summer heat and humidity of Georgia. They would camp at military bases up and down the California coast. It turned out that her brother was a friend of mind who was in my reserve unit in San Diego. Again, what a small world. We enjoyed talking to her and her boys before turning in for the night.




July 28, 2009
Miles 10696-11,121



Our friend in the travel trailer made breakfast for Jim and me before we pulled up stakes. We had decided to drive east to Interstate 5 and blast south to get home as soon as possible. It was a long, boring, very hot drive south. We stopped at every rest stop to soak our tee shirts to try to stay cool. I lost track of Jim at one of the many stops. I had told Jim I was going to stop at my daughter’s apartment in Los Angeles to spend the night with her. She is a senior at USC and will graduate May 14 with a BS degree in dental hygiene. I ride through the LA traffic on the way to her place near Hollywood. I feel really out of place here. I reflect on the change from the wilds of Alaska and Canada to the wilds of Hollywood with all the hustle and bustle and fakery. I wonder what some of these people must think of my dirty, dusty bike loaded down with gear and aluminum side cases decorate with stickers from Prudhoe Bay, Kenai Peninsula, Yukon Territory, Hyder, Alaska and all the other places we went and things we saw. I had only another 100 miles until I would arrive home in San Diego. That night I enjoyed being with my daughter.

After a trip of this magnitude you feel like you have actually accomplished something. You realize it has defined you and become a large part of who you are as a motorcycle tourer. I am planning another month long trip in the summer of 2010 to Yellowstone, Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota. I will probably continue south through Kansas (ugh!) and Missouri to Tennessee to visit family and friends. My dad will be in western North Carolina and I will stop in to say hello and make another appearance at the Dragon (yawn). Fortunately I know better and less popular roads than the Dragon that are near-by.

So what did I learn after this ride? Here are a few disjointed ideas.

1) Plan an epic ride and just do it before you get too old, disabled, or some other issue comes up to give you an excuse for not doing it.
2) Camp to save money and get close to nature. If you complain about not liking to camp, be prepared to spend a lot of money. Perhaps you may already making excuses for why you cannot do a trip like this.
3) Don’t worry about bears. Bring lots of bug spray.
4) Carry an extra rear axle nut.
5) Never leave a tire with good tread behind.
6) Never pass up a free meal, a hot shower or a chance to sleep in a friend’s house.
7) Don’t do a long trip with someone you do not know very well. Even your closest friend can bug you on a long trip, but especially someone you have just met.
Get dirt bike riding experience to feel comfortable on dirt and gravel.
9) Always be on the lookout for the Mandeep. He is your friend.
10) No matter what you do, keep riding until you die.


Docsabre

2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

Last edited by docsabre; 04-13-2010 at 12:31 AM.
docsabre is offline  
post #48 of 73 Old 04-12-2010, 11:35 PM
Stromthusiast!
 
motornutt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Durango, CO
Posts: 46
What an excellent read. Very well written and entertaining. Thank you for sharing.

"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough" [Mario Andretti]

Mr. Motornutt
DL1K4 Silver
PCIII, Staintunes, Givi crash bars, Jesse hard bags, Touratech soft bags, Fenda Extenda, Suzuki Center Stand, Pro Taper SE bars, Symtec grip heaters, Grip Puppies

Mrs. Motornutt
05 Wee Blue
SW-Motech center stand, Suzuki heated grips and hand guards
motornutt is offline  
post #49 of 73 Old 04-13-2010, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
Stromthusiast!
 
docsabre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 409
Thanks. It was almost as much fun to write as it was to ride. Glad you enjoyed it.

2000 Honda Sabre VT1100 (194,000 miles)
2005 Suzuki DL650 (116,000 miles)
1976 BMW R90/6 (33,000 miles)
2009 Vespa GTS250ie (8200 miles)
1993 Honda CB750 (13,000 miles)
2013 BMW R1200GS LC (16,600 miles)
2015 Kawasaki KLR650E (3,200 miles)

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
docsabre is offline  
post #50 of 73 Old 04-13-2010, 10:31 AM
Stromthusiast!
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Silverado, Ca. Orange County
Posts: 27
Enjoyed your write-up very much. Your writing sort of pulled me in. So do you still have the hatchet or did you leave it with the body?
BUTCH is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome