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Other Motorcycles Forum for you to discuss anything about any other motorcycles. Good place for former (and soon to be) V-Strom owners to keep on the site even though they are without a strom.

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  #41  
Old 11-16-2012, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by V-Tom View Post
I find that pretty interesting.. in the automobile world chassis rigidity (this is different from suspension rigidity) is the basis for good handling. With a rigid chassis the suspension can be engeneered to do the neccesary compliance and keep the tires on the ground without un-needed harshness of the ride. You would think the same would be true of bikes. I wonder why that is different?

..Tom
the big difference is that on a motorcycle you have suspension forces acting both vertically and horizontally in a corner. In a car suspension forces are primarily vertical. Because the suspension on the bike is only designed to absorb the vertical travel the chassis needs to flex to absorb the horizonal component. Kinda crazy stuff
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  #42  
Old 11-16-2012, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by soderholmd View Post
the big difference is that on a motorcycle you have suspension forces acting both vertically and horizontally in a corner. In a car suspension forces are primarily vertical. Because the suspension on the bike is only designed to absorb the vertical travel the chassis needs to flex to absorb the horizonal component. Kinda crazy stuff
I'm thinking out loud here as I love understanding stuff:


I think a car has much more side forces than a bike although I can see that a bike's supension isn'rt set up to deal with them. (If a rider never leaned out and if bike tires were perfectly rounded then there wouldn't be any side forces; but of course nothing is ever perfect.)

Porsche patented a concept of Passive Rear wheel steering on cars to deal with the side forces by allowing a bit of sideways deflection under side loads. This let the rear wheels track a bit in such a way to improve handling (effectively reducign slip angle of the tires under load.) I wonder if something similar is going on here?

..Tom
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  #43  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:07 PM
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On a car, the suspension only needs to deflect vertically (although there is usually some 'swing', as the parts are on pivots. The sideways force is not (unless you are hitting curbs) something that the suspension needs to move in response to, in order to keep the tires in contact with the paving (the point of suspension, after all). However, when a bike is leaned over, irregularities in the pavement generate forces in directions the suspension is not designed to move. So a certain amount of chassis compliance (torsional non-rigidity) is usually desirable on bikes to keep the tires on the pavement. The 'rear-steer' on some auto rear-suspensions is usually to enhance 'turn-in' on corner entry, rather than to allow for better pavement contact.
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  #44  
Old 11-17-2012, 03:04 PM
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A better description would be Goldwing Street Glide.
HD's Street Glide gets a lot of attention from posers who don't really want the full blown Electra Glide. Looks as if Honda wants some of that kind of attention too.
As for me, it would be considered heavily if I were in the market. I've heard so many times from friends that the GW was too much bike for them at this point in their life. Always looking for something without the "kitchen sink".
I think this is Honda's way of meeting them half way.


Not a 'chopper" and certainly not a "Street Glide" knock off.
Closer to (but not close enough) to the original F6, the Valkyrie.
Time on one (original) will re-define your perception of "cruiser". But, many of the Valkyrie owners aren't warming to the F6B.
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Old 11-18-2012, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by nbsdave View Post
Not a 'chopper" and certainly not a "Street Glide" knock off.
Closer to (but not close enough) to the original F6, the Valkyrie.
Time on one (original) will re-define your perception of "cruiser". But, many of the Valkyrie owners aren't warming to the F6B.
I owned a Valkyrie for several years.
Definately not a Street Glide regarding the motor but I don't think anyone can deny that the looks are not.
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