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Mexico For those in Mexico, or may have an interest in riding to Mexico and could use some tips from the locals

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  #1  
Old 11-13-2012, 12:47 PM
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Default Avenida Sullivan

I've searched and searched and can't find for whom the Avenida Sullivan and Plaza Sullivan in Mexico City are named. Perhaps someone here can either clue me in or point me to somewhere that I can search some more.
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:12 AM
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There was a Lt. Sullivan of the Saint Patrick's Battalion (San Patricios) who became a colonel in the Mexican army
during the Mexican American war 1846.

"To Mexicans, the San Patricios were great heroes who defected because they could not stand to see the Americans
bullying a smaller, weaker Catholic nation. They fought not out of fear but out of a sense of righteousness and justice.
Every year, St. Patrick's Day is celebrated in Mexico, particularly in the places where the soldiers were hanged. They
have received many honors from the Mexican government, including streets named after them, plaques, postage
stamps issued in their honor, etc."
The Saint Patrick’s Battalion – los San Patricios
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:25 AM
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Interesting. I had researched the Patricios but couldn't find any of them named Sullivan. Where did you come across his name and his involvement in the Mexican war?
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Old 11-15-2012, 02:20 AM
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My bad, got it wrong!

First, I saw this list of San Patricios with a ranker named Michael O'Sullivan:
St. Patrick's Battalion :: Batalln de San Patricio: the Irish Heroes of Mexico

Then I found an .edu web page, which I haven't been able to re-google, listing staff reports from the Mexican Army
during Santa Ana's time. One of the reports listed with an info title something like "Lt. Michael Sullivan commisioned
as Colonel". Jumped to a conclusion.

The real story is here:
Colonia San Rafael, un barrio de antaño (Distrito Federal) | México Desconocido
Rough translation:
"Calle de Sullivan is known as one of the traditional places in Mexico City for meetings with prostitutes. What would
James Sullivan think to know that his name would be famous among chilangos, not the work of his life, but for the
girls who chose 'life gallant' on a street named after him in order to operate?

"By the way ... Who was James Sullivan? A member of the San Patricio Battalion, a hero of the war of 1847?

"No. James Sullivan was an American businessman who received the concession to build the railway Mexico -
Nuevo Laredo during the government of Manuel González (1880-1884). The railway Mexico - Nuevo Laredo was
finally inaugurated in 1887.

"James Sullivan, as every foreign contractor in Mexico, lined their pockets with money while the Mexican railroad
system connected with the United States. Even today the railroad he built is backbone of the Mexican rail network."

My brother-in-law, "The Gorman", and his son and daughter are Chicago Police (he's retired, like me) with Mexican
street gang experience. Going to send this along to remind them of traditional Mexican-Irish connections.
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Old 11-17-2012, 05:51 AM
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Many thanks for providing this information. I had explored this topic off and on for years but never came this close. However I don't see the source of the quotes about James Sullivan within the Colonia San Rafael link. Is there another page?

Last edited by keetmanaa; 11-17-2012 at 07:47 AM.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:53 AM
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I didn't realize the site I named was so complex.

I used Google translation on the page but don't remember the exact search terms. It must be a quote from
academia, commonly used. I found similar here:

Google Translate
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:03 PM
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Thanks for following up. That translated page answers my questions about Sullivan street.
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Old 05-26-2014, 02:20 PM
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Hi, I have some information re: Avenida Sullivan and the origins of its name. Both Avenida Sullivan and Sullivan Park in Mexico City are named after my great great grandfather, James W. Sullivan. Born around 1870, he was a soap manufacturer who, like many of us raised in south Texas, was a part of both the American and Mexican communities. He lived in San Antonio, Texas, and manufactured and sold soap/detergent products in south Texas and Mexico. He was very respected and well-liked by many in Mexico City and was viewed as ahead of his time in bridging the gap between the two cultures.
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