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DL1000 - 2002-2012 For those bikes with two pipes

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  #91  
Old 12-13-2012, 10:18 AM
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Well my Yamahas have had bent shift forks, another had bad 2nd gear dogs, my last started using a qt of oil every 500 miles and ended up a qt every 150 like fill up and add a quart

so

I am pretty immune to these minor Vee burps

I CAN feel the pea under the mattress but its better than the watermelon
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  #92  
Old 12-13-2012, 10:58 AM
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Thumbs up make it better without the expence !

Hi,Don't bother with a power commander,find a nice friendly suzuki dealership that has a yoshi box ask them to plug it in and set it up for the vstrom ...had mine done last year ....the motor is a changed animal now..throttle response is crisper and acceleration is equal to a sv 1000 now.... as for fuel consumption going up,if it has its not even noticeable !
Ive had my vstrom 8 years now and its never missed a beat,most of the clutch problems are'nt clutch problems at all its the way the motor is set up... get it wrong and you'll get chudder.
Always set the TPS before syncing the throttle bodies and you'll have a happy motor
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  #93  
Old 12-15-2012, 08:11 PM
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Guys, c'mon. A little reality check, please.

All the stuff in this thread is anecdotal. (Yes, including mine, below. But that doesn't invalidate my point.) That's fine, but no one should be passing their individual experience off to someone interested in a DL1000 as if it is universal. To wit:

Quote:
...most of the clutch problems are'nt clutch problems at all its the way the motor is set up... get it wrong and you'll get chudder.
Pardon me, but if "setting up the motor" corrects the chudder problem...you didn't have the chudder problem; you just incorrectly thought you did. A post like this implies to a V-Strom newcomer that the clutch chudder problem is not legitimate. If that were true, then it would not have been cured for so many owners (as it was in my case) by doing nothing other than installing a Hinkle Werks basket.

Quote:
..."stressful" is a category that is pretty much unique to the DL1000.
I, on the other hand, am on my second V-Strom 1000 and have never found either one to be "stressful." I've never had any odd behavior starting from stops or almost-stops. Nor have I ever had any surging, or any of the other engine performance issues mentioned here. Both of my DL1000s ran/run as flawlessly as any road bike I've ever owned. (I'm 59, been riding bikes more than cars since I was 15, and have had something approaching 50 motorcycles.)

"Unique to the DL1000"? I'm sorry, but that's just nonsense. You essentially just said that there's never been a bad running bike, except for DL1000s. Any bad-running bike is, of course, stressful, and I dare say the percentage of bad running DLs is probably no greater than that of any other make/model. The fact that, for example, a throttle body sync improves engine behavior does not mean that there is something inherently wrong with the model. Doing a throttle body sync on my DL1000 didn't "fix" anything that I thought was "wrong"; it just made what I consider a great running engine run a little better. But then, I can't remember ever owning a motorcycle that wasn't improved by a little occasional tune up procedure, either.

Quote:
I guess I must be lucky, my Vee has been so trouble free its a definite keeper.
[I know you're being facitous here, so forgive my borrowing this quote as if you were serious.] Or maybe you are more typical of DL1000 owners than you think, and you've just been led to believe that you are "lucky" because, well, people generally don't complain in an online forum about problems they don't have. I'm not, of course, dismissing the stories of those who have had problems. I'm just saying that an informal online forum is no real measure of actual likelihood. If problems were actually the rule, rather than the exception, well, the V-Strom probably wouldn't have the dedicated following it enjoys.

Quote:
If you want refined, go with the Wee. The Wee is a better all around bike. If you want to tinker and ride something with brutal torque, go with the Vee.
Sorry, I'm not buying that the DL650 is a "better all around bike." I could just as easily say that the DL650--a lower displacement engine dropped into essentially the same chassis--is a grossly overbuilt and under-engined bike. The only "tinkering" I've had to do on a DL1000 is the clutch basket replacement on the 2003. (My 2007 had not had the problem before I got it; nor did it acquire the problem before I replaced the basket. Already being in posession of a Hinkle Werks basket from my wrecked 2003, I installed it anyway, because of my confidence in it. Over 10,000 miles later, I still don't have a recurrance of the problem.)

And about that: Lest you think I'm a Suzuki appologist, I also am among those riders who simply would not tolerate a bad case of clutch chudder. Therefore, I would have rid myself of my 2003 had I not found the Hinkle Werks fix, and I certainly would not have bought my second DL1000 had I not been confident that the problem is no longer an issue to me, should it occur. But by the same token I also would not tolerate (for just the first historic example that pops into mind) the ridiculously raucous starter of the old Yamaha Virago. (Remember that?) Neither condition will leave you stranded, but I still wouldn't tolerate either of them. I also didn't know about the KLR doohickey problem until after I bought my first one. But it, too, became a non-issue upon discovery of the widespread availability of an easy aftermarket fix. (I had two KLRs, too. The 2013 in mustard yellow looks mighty good to me, and if I hadn't further "purified" my idea of what a 650 dualsport ought to be, the doohickey issue wouldn't make me hesitate to buy another, 'cause I know what to do about it.)

But moreover, if I wanted a 650 so-called "adventure bike," it would definitely not be a DL650. Frankly, I don't want a 650 V-twin anything, least of all one for making off-road pretensions. Too small for the long-haul; too cumbersome for the trail. There are plenty of far more trail-worthy street-legal 650s out there. But I've not noticed a similar proliferation of lightweight 1000cc single-cylinder dualsports, have you? I bought the first DL1000 specifically because I wanted something larger than a 650 for the road. I'm just not interested in riding a 650--no matter how many cylinders it has--on a long trip. Again, that's "just me"...but no doubt alot of other DL1000 owners, too. I have no qualms about your preference being different. But it's silly to proclaim that the DL650 is an overall "better" bike when their engineering and design is so very similar; and it's not even close if your criteria rule out a 650 to begin with.

Truth is, I've become convinced anew that there is no one do-it-all dualsport that really satisfies me for both off-road enjoyment and long distance riding involving a considerable amount of highway. I don't care how "exotic European" they get, A 500-plus pound bike is a ridiculous thing for someone like me (and I dare say the vast majority of us) to really enjoy riding even mildly off-road. I'm not saying you can't do it; you can beat to death a Harley or a Honda CB750 four off-road if you insist; it's just not my idea of fun. That's why, after two KLRs and two DL1000s, I have found that the answer for me is a DL1000 and a DR650. Your desires and contentment and motorcycling philosophy, of course, may vary. As I said, it's all anecdotal.

Quote:
So after reading all of this stuff...I wonder if the OP is running away from OR towards the the big V ?
Man, me too! Moreover, I wonder how many potential DL1000 owners have been disuaded by this kind of runaway broad-brush generalization based on nothing but individual anecdotal testimonies.

So here's mine. Take it for what it's worth:

My local dealer (whom, by the way, I consider to be among the best--the "all dealers are dirtbags" myth being yet another inappropriate blanket generalization based on nothing but anecdotal horror stories) offered to me a ride on a bike I'd been admiring for years: the KTM 990 Adventure. I really like that bike. I'd love to have one. I was tempted (again) to buy one.

But my 20 mile ride, wonderful as it was, was enough to delight me in some ways, but surprise me in three others.

First, I found out the stock fuel capacity of that--don't get me wrong; utterly marvelous bike--is a half gallon less than that of the DL1000. You wanna talk about deal breakers, that's one of mine. Yeah, you can address it with the aftermarket for...egads!...$1600!

So yeah, go on about things that ought to be addressed by the manufacturer from the get-go and I'll join right in with you, even in the context of clutch chudder and noisy starters. But especially in the context of another 1000cc so-called "adventure bike" with anemic fuel capacity, yet which--adding injury to insult--costs HALF AGAIN what a DL1000 costs new.

Second, while I would never betray my dealer's generosity by abusing the bike (trust and decent behavior is a two-way street), I did have opportunity to see how its engine responded and performed. I noted two big differences: It reved quicker. Lots quicker. But in seeming contradiction to that, it had a distinctly flat lull when rolling the throttle on from 50-60 mph--a place where I've grown accustomed to my DL's satin smooth, strong pull. Is this customary of KTM 990s? I would certainly not presume to make such a generalization based on my one purely anecdotal experience. But it does prove one thing, doesn't it?: DL1000s are not the only bikes that sometimes may not be running 100% when purchased new.

Third, despite finding the Katoom's comparitively serious-business suspension and almost twitchy throttle response exhilarating, it was also definitely more "stressful" (and tiring) to ride 20 miles than is my DL1000 is for 50. That's something else to consider on any trip long enough to call an "adventure."

Bottom line is, I now find myself daydreaming about a different next-perfect-for-me-bike: The 2014 DL1000. Unless, of course, they stupidly reduce the fuel capacity. Again, for me that would be a deal breaker. Unless, of course, the aftermarket responded with a reasonably-priced instant fix--like a properly-fitting 8 gallon plastic tank for no more than about $300. So even if I had to do that, I'd be planning on another DL1000 because--until something really comparable comes along--I'm convinced its the best value out there in the category. I can't remember any other street/road bike that was on my wish-list three times in a row.

James

Last edited by JET_V-Strom; 12-15-2012 at 09:27 PM.
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  #94  
Old 12-15-2012, 08:51 PM
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Talked to a high up Suzuki "Factory guy " at the show yesterday about my 82 GS850 and when I told him that I was thinking about dumping my Vee and getting a Honda CB500X he looked me right in the eye and said " I don't blame you " !!!. Not what I expected him to say..


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  #95  
Old 12-16-2012, 02:15 AM
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It's list time...
1.) JET, good to see you post! That was a good read.
2.) At some point in time it is possible that I will own a bike with more quirks than my k6 Vee. Someday. Maybe.
3.) Just cause "my" Vee has had it's issues doesn't mean they are all bad. Agreed.
Actually, in temps below about 65F she runs like a fine watch.
4.) I'd buy another Suzuki in a minute! Just not a Vee.
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  #96  
Old 12-16-2012, 07:54 AM
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I compliment them about
"i don't blame you " being a wonderful way to avoid a prolonged annoying conversation.

You left off the KTM's Plank of a seat.

I have always sympathized with owners of anything that has an endemic problem which a manufacturer could fix for $5 that drags on indefinitely. Supporting the spring basket concentrically and beefing up the plate so its a little stronger would have been almost a cheap fix.

Maybe I don't understand but if you "FIX" something without go changing a model are you then libel to fix all previous ones? If you call it a new model do you have to go through all the EPA BS once again ? Modern life is never simple
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  #97  
Old 12-16-2012, 08:16 AM
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Well...after a short ride on the Vstrom today,and just under 5K miles in a few months, I think it could very well be my last bike. I am going to retire the end of February I think.

It fits all of my want's...good wind protection, great ergo's (best of any bike so far), good handling/power, fairly light weight, good storage, decent 2up when needed. I bought it for sport touring type use. I had a FJR and never liked it, the Vstrom is much better IMO.

I have added a fork brace, lowered it, added a auxiliary fuse block, heated grips, moved the top box back, changed the gearing, added a speedo corrector...

The main issue I have had with it is the lack of low end power, the gear change has fixed that, totally different bike since. Any other bike would be just "because" not for any other practical reason

I think most of the "problems" that people have with the Vee is partially due to the high gearing from the factory. I dropped 1 tooth from the front, and added 2 to the rear and now it's a totally different bike...

My buddy had a SV650, and I always thought it had "anemic" power, but I was riding a Gen1 FZ1 at that time..
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  #98  
Old 12-16-2012, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JET_V-Strom View Post
Guys, c'mon. A little reality check, please.

All the stuff in this thread is anecdotal. (Yes, including mine, below. But that doesn't invalidate my point.) That's fine, but no one should be passing their individual experience off to someone interested in a DL1000 as if it is universal.

If problems were actually the rule, rather than the exception, well, the V-Strom probably wouldn't have the dedicated following it enjoys.

I'm convinced its the best value out there in the category. I can't remember any other street/road bike that was on my wish-list three times in a row.

James
Thanks. A good read and three points worth remembering.

To get this clutch chudder in perspective. Personally had well over 200 VStrom clutch baskets open to re-engineer the chudder out of them. A load of SV1000 baskets too. That over a four year period with them coming in from all countries for the last three. Know exactly what the trigger is that starts them off. Can be annoying the owner enough anywhere from 5,000 to 50,000 miles so they decided to do something about it. Diagnosis is key. A handful of these sent had been wrongly diagnosed or the owner just wanted rid of the risk because the trigger clearly had not let go.

Anecdotal – We can’t be certain how prevalent it is. Looking at the way they are made they all have the potential to chudder. I estimate it never becomes an issue for at least 50% of owners.

Don’t let it put you off purchase. Remember diagnosis is key and fortunately that’s very reliable.

Last edited by svman; 12-16-2012 at 08:52 AM.
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  #99  
Old 12-16-2012, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richw View Post
You left off the KTM's Plank of a seat.
But I actually liked the seat. It seems that the biggest change on the 2013 is a lower overall seat height. That's what I was so excited about when I first sat on it in the showroom. Its proportions now fit me fine. I'm only a smidgen over 5'7". (My neck mechanic assures me that the high performance parts he installed in February not only yield smoother turns and stronger spark, but gained me a centimeter overall, to boot. But that doesn't do anything for my 30" inseam.)

If the KTM's seat seems harsh, there's an easy procedure for fixing that:
  1. Verify the presence of $1.25 in your right front pocket.
  2. Walk straight to the drink vending machine. (It's immediately adjacent to the Service Department counter.)
  3. Insert the buck-twenty-five (US) and key item number 14.
  4. Remove the resulting 16 oz Diet Mountain Dew.
  5. Walk across the showroom and sit on a DR650.
  6. Now, as they say, do the Dew.
  7. When done, dismount.
  8. Proceed immediately back to the KTM, being careful to not be disracted by the vintage Bultaco Pursang on display.

The KTM 990's seat will have been magically transformed into a Easy Boy recliner.

Since the aftermarket neck upgrade, I also managed to trim away a full 50 lbs of...um...excess gusset material. Now at a stable 150 lbs with soft luggage removed and half a tank of fuel, my overall handling is predictably much improved. But an unanticipated caveat is that the modification seems to have left me with little more than about 1.0625 mm material thickness between a particular subframe appendage (the actual designed purpose of which I'm still trying to discern) and the outside world. This has effectively modified the oak-like resiliency of the DR's seat into something approaching that of diamond.

However...KTM was evidently drinking something other than Diet Mountain Dew when they conceived that suede seat cover. Whaa...? On a motorcycle? On a so-called "enduro touring" motorcycle? How stupid is that?!

Egads, I'd rather ride on the DR's anvil than squish around on a soaked rag every time there's a Georgia afternoon popcorn shower. Wet blue jeans tend to chafe, not to mention attract strange glances from coworkers.

James

Last edited by JET_V-Strom; 12-16-2012 at 11:41 AM.
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  #100  
Old 12-16-2012, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JET_V-Strom View Post
Egads, I'd rather ride on the DR's anvil than squish around on a soaked rag every time there's a Georgia afternoon popcorn shower.
Wet blue jeans tend to chafe, not to mention attract strange glances from coworkers.
Nice to see "other" bikes getting battered for a change.
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